The progressive aspect expresses the dynamic quality of actions that are in progress.

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2
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3answers
5k views

“will you be going home” vs. “will you go home”

What's the difference between saying; Will you be going home this summer? Will you go home this summer? Are there any differences between these in written or spoken English?
2
votes
4answers
10k views

“By clicking submit you agree…” or “By clicking submit you are agreeing…”

By clicking submit you agree to the Terms and Conditions. By clicking submit you are agreeing to the Terms and Conditions. Which is correct? Why?
1
vote
2answers
82 views

They are going to be letting me out next week

I am reading a book "Second hand" by Michael Zadoorian in which a boy visits his ex girlfriend in the hospital as she attempted suicide. There is a sentence which creates some difficulty to me: "They ...
92
votes
6answers
18k views

How do the tenses and aspects in English correspond temporally to one another?

Non-native speakers often get confused about what the various tenses and aspects mean in English. With input from some of the folk here I've put together a diagram that I hope will provide some ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

Describing completed action [closed]

So, I was having a fight with an English grammar expert with my little knowledge on the following sentence : Products are already being checked. My opponent was telling me that my sentence was ...
-1
votes
1answer
30 views

Can you please explain differences in following phrases: [duplicate]

Can you please explain differences in following phrases: I am thinking I thinking I think I have been thinking
1
vote
2answers
550 views

”We're looking forward to helping you find X” vs “We look forward to help you find X” etc

I’m trying to link the following items into a single sentence: we look forward to help you find X So for example, here are some ways I was thinking of doing that: We look forward to help you ...
7
votes
4answers
433 views

What's with the passive present perfect progressive? [duplicate]

I was taught that we made passive voice using be + the participle of the main verb, without changing the verb tense. E.g., I send letters. (present simple) Letters are sent. (present simple ...
9
votes
4answers
22k views

“Will be doing” vs. “will do”

What's the difference between: I will be eating cakes tomorrow. I will eat cakes tomorrow. And, when should I use the first form?
1
vote
2answers
7k views

Grammaticality of “I am worrying” and how it compares to “I am worried” and “I worry”

This question is about worried about vs. worrying about. I think "being worried about someone/something" is more usual than "worry about", isn't it? Can I use the progressive aspect for ongoing ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“I'll keep you company while you wait” or “I'll keep you company while you're waiting”

I know that while, like after, before, when, as soon as introduce time clauses, which require the present simple: I'll keep you company while you wait. But so many of the students have used the ...
7
votes
9answers
47k views

“have been working” vs. “have worked”

What is the difference between the following two sentences? I have been working here for 20 years. I have worked here for 20 years. The present perfect tense is used for repetitive or ...
0
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the historic present tense?

I learned that the historical present may be used to create an effect of immediacy in narratives. I have a question about the historic present tense. Why don't we use the progressive tense instead of ...
15
votes
8answers
6k views

“I'm lovin' it”

How normal-sounding is the slogan "I'm lovin' it" to native ears? I know it sounded quite odd to me when I first heard it — and it still sometimes does —, but I can't even tell why. Sure, love is ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Is “considering taking” grammatically correct?

I've seen the following sentence in a newspaper. Is it grammatical? He's considering taking early retirement. Taking = present progressive was used near another present progressive?
2
votes
1answer
832 views

Passive auxiliary verb or progressive one?

Uncle Vernon made another funny noise, like a mouse being trodden on.                —Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone Is ‘being’ a passive auxiliary verb or a progressive one?
0
votes
2answers
753 views

Correct usage of “of course you (do/are)”

In this exchange: A: I'm having trouble finding my car. B: Of course you are. I think this sentence could also be used, keeping the same meaning: Of course you do. I don't see any difference ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

“Supposing Jane ______ with us, what would you do?”

In this sentence: Supposing Jane ______ with us, what would you do? The available options for filling in that blank were: would come came will come has come is coming Could I know which is ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Looking forward

Recently I've seen a sentence with "looking forward". Could you explain why it contains a progressive aspect. Doesn't this phrase mean a thought process which cannot be seen and thus must be regarded ...
9
votes
3answers
6k views

Is it really wrong to say “I'm hearing”?

Many grammar books claim that ‘see’, ‘hear’, ‘taste’, ‘smell’, ‘feel’ are verbs that aren’t used in continuous forms, and yet, we do hear and see it quite often used by native speakers. For instance, ...
0
votes
1answer
430 views

Is this sentence in the Future Continuous?

Would be obliged if someone could clarify whether the following is in the Future Continuous tense. The Earth will be three degrees hotter by the year 2050. It seems so but I need to be ...
2
votes
3answers
17k views

“How long have you [had/been having] this?” - Cont. or Simple?

I'm studying Present Perfect tenses at the moment and have been wondering what tense should I use in this example: How long have you [had/been having] this thing? So I know that in some cases ...
0
votes
2answers
687 views

“Matt was phoning while we were having dinner”

I'm self-studying now and I've found an exercise. Matt ... while we were having dinner. The correct answer is phoned. But I couldn't figure out why was phoning is not a right choice. There is ...
5
votes
2answers
534 views

“I went to the hotel you were staying at” vs. “you stayed at”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two sentences? I went to the hotel you were staying at when you were in New York. I went to the hotel you stayed  at when you were in New York. ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Use of past and progressive tense

Can someone tell me which, if any, of the following sentences are correct: When she walked in, he was laying on the bed. When she walked in, he was laid on the bed. When she walked in, he ...
1
vote
1answer
343 views

“The key doesn't work” vs. “The key is not working” [closed]

Here's a situation. You go to your hotel room and the key that you have is not working. When you go back to the reception, should you say: The key is not working, can you fix it. Or The key ...
0
votes
3answers
7k views

“I am trying to learn” vs “I try to learn”

What is the difference between present simple and present progressive when it comes to actions like the following? At school, I am trying to learn a wide array of subjects. At school, I try ...
2
votes
2answers
226 views

Present Progressive or Simple Present for things that could be considered as a repeated action or as an action happening right now?

There's one thing about Simple Present versus Present Progressive which is still not quite clear to me. The rough overview is1: Use simple present for repeated actions, general things. Use present ...
0
votes
2answers
109 views

“Cannot believe what he saw” versus “cannot believe what he was seeing” [duplicate]

Which of the following sentences is grammatical: The boss could not believe what he saw yesterday morning when he entered the office. The boss could not believe what he was seeing yesterday morning ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

What is the difference between saying “I wasn't knowing” and “I didn't know”? [closed]

I was wondering what is the difference between I wasn't knowing and I didn't know? If I say, I wasn't knowing, I am talking about something unknown in past, the act of not knowing is finished, it ...
1
vote
4answers
2k views

“I'm not being” or “I'm not been”?

I'm not been able to make up my mind or I'm not being able to make up my mind? Which one is the correct sentence? Why is it correct and why is the other one incorrect? Edit 10/09/2012: ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Etymology of progressive forms [duplicate]

In spite of English the German language does not have Present/Past Progressive, although both languages have the same root. When and why did the progressive tenses develop and became part of the ...
0
votes
2answers
300 views

Can Past Progressive Tense be used for habitual past? [duplicate]

I ran across the following sentence in an ESL textbook (by Jack C. Richards): "I was going to auditions" which was used to say what the subject would do for some time after college. However, almost ...
4
votes
3answers
11k views

Would have done

Please read the following passage. I will post my question at the end of it. Here is the passage: At home I locked myself in. Jason, my lawyer and lyn sent texts simultaneously at the point the ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“I teach” vs. “I'm teaching” — which one is proper in this situation?

Following situation occurs/ed. I meet a friend for a coffee. We chat and I ask him what he's doing for work now. His answer: "I'm teaching English." This irks me. Because in that situation he's not ...
-1
votes
0answers
178 views

One of the underlined words is wrong. Choose either A, B, C or D [duplicate]

"What (are:A) you talking (about:B)? (I'm:C) not (understand:D) you." At first, I thought C, so the sentence would be "What are you talking about? I don't understand you." And I chose C because I ...
3
votes
5answers
27k views

“Will graduate” vs. “will be graduated” vs. “is going to graduate”

Which of the following sentences are correct? He will graduate in May. He will be graduated in May. He is going to graduate in May. Issue 1: Is the second one grammatical? Issue 2: ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between “deny doing something” and “deny having done something”

What is the difference between "deny doing something" and "deny having done something"? The context is as follows: While being questioned on the court, the man denied [taking/having taken] the ...
1
vote
1answer
264 views

When to use present perfect and when present perfect continuous?

In my English book it says ''I have done'' is used when an action is ended, but where there are consequences in the future. For example: 'There has been an accident, and as a result the street is ...
0
votes
6answers
9k views

“I don't understand you” vs. “I'm not understanding you” [closed]

Which sentence is correct? What are you talking about? I don't understand you. What are you talking about? I'm not understanding you. That was a question we've had in an exam and it was: ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

I see and I hear

Traditional English prescriptive grammar teaches that these two verbs, to see and to hear, when describing their sensory nature, should never be used in the progressive aspect of tenses. Thus I ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Why “should be doing” and not just “should do” in the following sentences?

What is the difference between "should X" and "should be Xing" in the following contexts? Or are they interchangeable? 10 Things you should do to improve the health of your hair. 10 Things ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

I am going to go?

My English teacher told me that "going to go" doesn't exist in English but I saw it many times. For example "The whole band is going to go to show their support". I'd like to know if it's possible to ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

“I am going to bed” vs. “I will be going to bed”

What is the difference between saying the following? I am going to bed in a few minutes. I will be going to bed in a few minutes. Or I will be getting off here. Or, I guess, I will be ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is this correct: “Water will be being drunk by Michael”?

I started with "Michael is drinking water", which I could convert to "Water is being drunk by Michael", which I could change to the past tense as "Water was being drunk by Michael". That leads me to ...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

What is the difference between “I have worked here” and “I have been working here”? [duplicate]

What is the difference between the following sentences? When can I use either? I have worked here and I have been working here
3
votes
1answer
528 views

Present simple or present continuous?

Here is an exercise from Intermediate Language Practice by Michael Vince: Complete the following sentence with a present simple or present continuous form of the words in bold. Pat has ...
2
votes
3answers
3k views

Is the “is being employed” bit in this sentence grammatical?

Mr. Peter is being employed at our company as "Marketing Supervisor" as of 01.01.2010 till date with a monthly salary of 0000.0000
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Difference between “have had” and “having”

What is the difference between the following two sentences? I have had a headache since this morning. I am having a headache since this morning.
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

Difference between present perfect and perfect continous [closed]

What is the difference between these two sentences:- The traffic police has blocked the road for heavy vehicles since last Friday and It has been raining heavily since morning.