The present tense is a grammatical tense that locates a situation or event in present time.

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Why don't you double the 'l' in the ing-form of ' to feel'?

One of the rules for forming the -ing form of verbs is that when the verb ends with an -l, you have to double the 'l'. But why don't you double the 'l' in 'feeling' then?
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4answers
206 views

Do we use the present or the past after “when” in a conditional sentence?

He said we would get married when we get older. or He said we would get married when we got older. Which tense of the verb get should be used?
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100 views

Adjectives with “-ing” and “-ed” and Present Simple [closed]

I'm wondering if it's correct to use Adjectives ending with "ing" or "ed" in Present Simple. For example: She is stunning. He is boring. The Earth is amazing. I am always depressed. Is it Present ...
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2answers
110 views

In the present tense, can I use “ought to have” where “have” means “to possess”?

I'm not a native English speaker. All the examples of "ought to have" in my grammar book are in the past tense. But can I use it in the present tense to say that someone probably has something? ...
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1answer
36 views

Using 'Present Perfect' with 'in the past'

This came across when I was browsing an Australia gaming website, this is the whole sentence: "In the past, Hideo Kojima has been a regular at the PlayStation Awards when his games have won." ...
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1answer
59 views

「get+verb(passive)」 vs 「verb」

I can't tell what the difference is between the following two sentences: I need to get that figured out. I need to figure that out. I heard the first sentence from my friend and he is a native ...
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2answers
75 views

present or subjunctive

In the sentence "the tradition wants that it be always the same person who handles the teapot" (where "be" is a subjunctive), I was wondering if "handles" should not be replaced by the subjunctive "...
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46 views

If you have a sentence that implies that something happened in the past, do you talk about it in past tense if it is an event in a book?

I don't know whether the title is clear or not, so I'll try to give an adequate example: From these brief references in the Lord of the Rings, you can picture what Middle-earth is like before he ...
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2answers
72 views

A strange use instance of Present Simple in a sentence

I'm reading an article in the NYT. And it has the next paragraph: I watched Abraham interview half a dozen deportees. What he said was true: They were like him. To a middle-­aged farmer who had ...
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1answer
31 views

Why is it “says” not “said”?

The job of a student leader is onerous, he says, and you can become overwhelmed by the responsibilities and workload. “So you must set up an action framework, and follow it through,” he advises. ...
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66 views

“Whenever I discuss X, people don't know what I'm talking about” — why the progressive tense?

Consider the two sentences: Whenever I discuss X, people don't know what I'm talking about. Whenever I discuss X, people don't know what I talk about. I think the first one should be ...
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2answers
122 views

Simple present, or present continuous?

Which one is correct: Today, she talks to me by phone from the middle of Italy. What is she doing there? She is working on her novel. In the first sentence, is the tense correct, with the ...
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2answers
108 views

Should I describe a book I've read in the past or present tense?

For example, should I say, "Recently, I finished a novel that was called The Pyrates. The plot of it was that a hero called Avery was sent by the King of England blah, blah, blah." OR "Recently I ...
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1answer
74 views

Should you use past or present tense in a sentence if it ends in something like in olden and modern times?

Large amounts of gold weren’t worth much and merely had to be gotten ridden of in olden times like in modern times.' OR Large amounts of gold aren't worth much and merely have to be gotten rid of ...
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4answers
257 views

Simple Present. They build a house next to mine. Why is it wrong?

Why is it wrong to say they build a house next to mine? The explanation i got was nobody is building a house every year or every month next to yours. The correct answer was they are building a house ...
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1answer
81 views

“I'm always (being) asked silly questions!” Doesn't the continuous verb form sound a bit awkward compared to the simple one?

In order to emphasise the annoying aspect of a habit – be it someone else's or one's own – a continuous tense instead of a simple one is used: People are always asking me silly questions! ...
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0answers
78 views

Unclear use of present tense in specific sentence

As a non-native speaker I'm having a hard time understanding why the author uses the present tense of 'begin' in the following sentence: Sess was thinking about that as the rain started in and the ...
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2answers
1k views

Is it wrong to use “Did you ever” in a sentence?

My German friend thinks that it is wrong to use "Did you ever" in the sentence "Did you ever fly a kite"? She is telling me it is wrong because you must use "Have" with "Ever", which would make the ...
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1answer
130 views

Present Simple vs Present Continuous

I was doing some exercises and I stumbled upon something that isn't very clear to me. I have to fill in the gaps and explain why I use Simple Present or Present Continuous. I (to be) furious with ...
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3answers
36 views

Does using 2 Present Simple verbs create ambiguity in their ordering?

One of the Facebook configuration features has the following label: "If you don't want a Facebook account after you pass away, you can request to have your account permanently deleted." My friend ...
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1answer
41 views

Where is the difference in meaning here? [closed]

Difference in meaning between: I haven’t eaten anything all day. I have not been eating all day. thank you very much :)
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1answer
45 views

In present-tense narrative, does “I spend the NEXT few hours…” make sense?

I'm writing a novel in present-tense. If all the actions are in the present-tense, e.g. as the character is experiencing them, does the phrase, "I spend the next few hours pondering about it" make ...
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2answers
214 views

“Why don't they help him?” Why do we use simple present here?

THE SETTING You are walking in the street and you see an old man on the other side stumble and fall to the ground. He tries to get up but he can’t. Nobody is helping him. You say, to no-one in ...
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40 views

Simple Present, Simple Past or Past perfect progressive? [duplicate]

Suppose if there's a web site which was out of service yesterday. And it's still down today. Which sentence below should I tell the web master? The web site is down/(out of service) since yesterday. ...
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1answer
75 views

Present continuous vs Present perfect continuous [closed]

I am waiting for you for almost an hour I have been waiting for you for almost an hour What's the difference? Are both OK?
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1answer
61 views

Past or present tense when talking about firsts that happened in the past?

When talking about firsts that happened in the past, is it okay to use the present tense? For instance, if we want to talk about George Washington being the first president of the United States, ...
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59 views

Is this question asked in the right manner?

"Do you think the children enjoyed their meal?" As you can see, this question started with the "Present Tense's auxiliary verb" which was "Do". Why can we still use Past Tense's verb (enjoyed) then? ...
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4answers
1k views

She's always knowing something she's not supposed to

She's always knowing something she's not supposed to. Is this sentence correct? Why? Why not? Are we dealing with a so called "present progressive"?
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1answer
76 views

Use of the present continuous to refer to timetabled events

One of the things that is constantly confusing for English language learners, but comes with ease to native speakers, is when to use present continuous and when to use present simple. Because of this,...
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1answer
35 views

Which one is correct? (Present Perfect Continuous vs Present Perfect)

My sister and her boyfriend have not been going out together for a long time. Or My sister and her boyfriend have not gone out together for a long time.
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1answer
119 views

Present Continuous or Present Simple?

Could you tell me if the sentence below is grammatically correct? We usually grow vegetables in our garden, but this year we are not growing any. I'm not completely sure that in the second part of ...
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0answers
600 views

I work on Friday vs I work on Fridays

I found a grammar book that states the following: (Grammar In Use Intermediate by Cambridge unit 18 pg.36 Present Tenses ) Which means that it is OK to use the simple present form to describe the ...
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70 views

Big Jet Plane. “She drive me crazy”

I'm only learning English, so I'm sorry for my mistakes. Here's words from song Angus and Julia Stone - Big Jet Plane. She drive me crazy. I thought, here should be "she drives me crazy". Pls, ...
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6answers
169 views

Disagreement between “He's making…” and “He makes…” [closed]

The sentence is: He {the verb to make} rude comments about my clothes every time I see him! I filled in: He makes rude comments about my clothes every time I see him! My teacher said it ...
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2answers
156 views

Is it acceptable to use both 'written' and 'wrote' in the same surprising sentence? [closed]

In that project I wrote the most complex code I had ever written in my life. Is this grammatically correct?
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1answer
51 views

What's the tense for remarking a thing happened in the past? [closed]

Shall I change That Bilbo said he was a legendary burglar is really funny. to That Bilbo said he was a legendary burglar was really funny. ?
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2answers
1k views

Did you still want vs Do you still want

Is it grammatically correct to ask: "Did you still want to go to the park today?" Or should it be: "Do you still want to go to the park today?"
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Present Perfect Progressive in scientific writing?

Scientific writing is generally supposed to be written in present tense (focus on proof of the existence of the result, not how the author arrived at it). However, I have a case where this results in ...
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3answers
381 views

Difference between “What time do you come to class every day?” and “What time do you go to class every day?”

Could someone please explain me the difference between the following? A: What time do you go to class every day? B: At 8:00 A: What time do you come to class every day? B: At 8:00 I ...
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125 views

Why is this sentence infelicitous?

Consider the sentence: I saw her cry. Why is it, then, that we can't say: I saw her be crying. And instead say: I saw her crying. ? Why is the second sentence infelicitous?
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1answer
40 views

Couldn't have put VS couldn't put [duplicate]

Today I came across the following phrase: He couldn't have put it better, when he said: "..." But why does it require perfect tense? Can it be replaced with simple tense instead? He couldn't ...
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2answers
97 views

“She's being obnoxious” - is my intuition correct?

Consider the sentence: She's being obnoxious. I know what the sentence means: she is not usually obnoxious, but she is right now. Now, what I'm interested in is why the verb be here in the ...
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3answers
2k views

To tell the name of a person I met in the past

I have a basic grammar question about the past tense. If I met a guy yesterday, which tense should I use about his name today? For example, "Yesterday I met a guy, his name is/was John."
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1answer
46 views

Are or Were? Which linking verb would satisfy this sentence [closed]

In 2003, around 80% of North America's population (are/were) urban area residents. Is the whole sentence grammatically correct?
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2answers
551 views

What tense is “I see that …” [closed]

For example, in "I see that you have a new car." the "I see" seems to imply something like "I am seeing now" or "I noticed", rather than the usual present simple tense connotation of a habit or ...
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4answers
64 views

Difference between two verb tenses [duplicate]

She is reading a lot these days. She has been reading a lot these days. Which one is correct? Is there any real difference between them?
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0answers
66 views

Use of past or present tense in references?

Helping a friend with a poorly translated English paper and wondered about this: the source has the writer make reference to documents prepared the 1990s (agreements prepared but never signed by ...
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1answer
81 views

What is the best word for this sentence? [closed]

I want to use the following sentence in my paper. However, I'm not sure if the usage is correct or not: The results indicated that the infiltration of xanthan into sandy soils increased ...
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1answer
43 views

Can you please explain differences in following phrases: [duplicate]

Can you please explain differences in following phrases: I am thinking I thinking I think I have been thinking
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721 views

What time suits you?

I am new on this forum, English is my second language so every now and then I come across some very confusing rules. Here is my first question: What time suits you? Why do we use "s" with suit?