Questions about the present-participle form of verbs.

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39
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1answer
3k views

Origin of “-ing”

What is the origin of the suffix -ing used to form gerunds and present participles? Why is the suffix the same in both cases?
8
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4answers
814 views

In “Lucifer Rising” - grammatical explanation for use of -ing form instead of “Rises”?

How does that work grammatically? I guess it's primarily used for titles (movies, songs etc.) but why?
8
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4answers
815 views

progressive forms: participle or gerund?

Progressive forms of verbs consist of the form to be + participle. At least that is what most English grammars say or they are imprecise and speak of the -ing form. My question is what follows after ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Why do non-native English speakers get the present participle wrong?

I see people saying things like this: With a new infusion of cash it allows to make the film. ...instead of... With a new infusion of cash it allows making the film. I can't find a ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Help identifying an error type “tried to help me learning”

I have a friend from Russia who is trying to learn English and recently used the sentence "He tried to help me learning..." (implied: the English language) It is obviously wrong and I corrected it ...
7
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5answers
3k views

“I am thinking to invest” or “I am thinking investing”?

Which of the following sentences is correct? I am thinking to invest in stocks. I am thinking investing into stocks.
7
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3answers
100k views

Comma before “including”?

Does this sentence require a comma before including? He has written on a range of moral issues including poverty, globalization, and euthanasia.
6
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1answer
2k views

Appositive phrase, participle phrase, gerund phrase and noun phrase. English is confusing

"Every English-speaking country is extremely sheepish towards mega-corporations and their puppet-governments. In continental Europe, France being an example, people stand up for their rights ...
6
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6answers
1k views

Why are present participle and infinitive equally acceptable for some verbs, but not others?

This question about "started teaching/to teach" made me realise that even though the present participle and infinitive are both acceptable after "started", that's not the case with other superficially ...
6
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2answers
6k views

Participle of “center/centre” in UK English — “centring”? Seriously? [closed]

As an American, I was never shocked to see the word "center" spelled as "centre." It didn't bother me at all. Honestly. But then I saw the participle of it spelled as "centring" as opposed to ...
6
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2answers
571 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
6
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3answers
954 views

Why is it “rough-looking” instead of “roughly looking”?

I’ve noticed recently that certain constructions with present active participles (meaning, -ing forms acting adjectivally) prefer to be modified by adjectives rather than by adverbs. For example, ...
5
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3answers
302 views

'Should've seen it glow' or 'should've seen it glowing'?

Which one of the following is the correct one? I should have seen it glow. I should have seen it glowing. Or are both correct? Would you parse them please?
5
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2answers
1k views

Is there any rhyme or reason to when one should double the last consonant when adding -ed or -ing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: focussed or focused? The double consonant Sometimes, final consonants are doubled when adding -ed or -ing to the end of a verb whose penultimate letter is a vowel. ...
5
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3answers
700 views

Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...
4
votes
3answers
686 views

Can the word “deceiving” stand for “positive”?

I was puzzled with the line “(President Lyndon Johnson’s) appearances can be deceiving,” in the Washington Post’s (April 2) article titled “President Lyndon Johnson did indeed attend an Easter Egg ...
4
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3answers
709 views

Is this use of present participle grammatically correct?

We are a Zhongguancun-based English training school looking for native English speakers from the US and Canada. If you are interested in this position. Please send your CV and photo to [email ...
4
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6answers
325 views

Why can't “being” come after the verb “feel”?

The question is completely edited. *I felt being dragged by a beast. The word being cannot be used here, and that's for sure. It sounds wrong. What I am trying to find here is why it is wrong. ...
4
votes
1answer
537 views

What is the present participle of “stop, drop, and roll”?

In a verb phrase, such as stop, drop, and roll, how do I conjugate this in the present participle? Stopping, dropping, and rolling? Stop, drop, and rolling?
4
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2answers
20k views

The adjective “dashing”: can it be used to describe a woman?

Can you say of a woman that she is "dashing", meaning that she looks stupendous, graceful etc.?
4
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2answers
64 views

Joy(as noun) followed by verb+ing

Did you have any joy ​finding that ​book you ​wanted? We ​tried ​asking ​local ​libraries for ​information, but got no joy from any of them. I noticed that the dictionary says that the word in ...
3
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4answers
708 views

Analysing clause elements and their function

I have a problem analysing this sentence from the point of finite/nonfinite clauses, clause elements and their functions: He does not want to destroy his parents' dream of him achieving a ...
3
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1answer
4k views

Gut-wrenching or -retching?

It was the most gut-retching thing I have ever heard. Wrenching sounds like it would make sense, but so does retching.
3
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1answer
1k views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
3
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3answers
999 views

Administrating vs Admining

I get the sense that the word "Admining", like the word "Admin" from which it derives, is used to refer to computer administration, while "Administrating", like "Administrator", is used more when it ...
3
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3answers
5k views

Is 'quiescing' a valid word? What does it mean?

What does quiescing mean in the following context? Quiescing a Database http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14231/start.htm
3
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2answers
86 views

Nobody was surprised at John being absent (present participle or gerund?)

Some time ago I learned the difference between Present Participle and Gerund and today I decided to pass any online test to make sure I get it. So, I passed it having made the only mistake which is ...
3
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3answers
892 views

Why are the present and the past participles of “submit” spelled with double t?

Why are the present and the past participles of submit spelled with two t's?
3
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2answers
568 views

Is “hanging bats” a participial phrase, gerund phrase, or simple noun phrase?

In the sentence "Hanging bats populate most of the caves in North America," what is the role of "hanging bats"? I believe it is a simple noun phrase containing the participle "hanging" (which ...
3
votes
2answers
85 views

Making something “something else”

Please take a look at this: The sunlight reflected on every wave crest, making the ocean a sea of sparkling stars. I'm trying to understand both of the bold parts, the followings are my ...
2
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5answers
3k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
2
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3answers
2k views

On the difference between “noun + infinitive” and “noun + present participle”

Infinitive and present participle can be used to modify the noun: Infinitive: I had no time to read those books. Present participle: There should be a law banning abortion. In (1), ...
2
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2answers
75 views

Difference between gerund and present participle [duplicate]

What is the difference between a gerund and present participle? When should we use a gerund and when should we use a present participle ?
2
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1answer
40k views

'Seen as' or 'seeing as'

Look at these examples: You should clean the milk seen as you spilt it. You should clean the milk seeing as you spilt it. Which one is correct, and how is it grammatically defined/termed?
2
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6answers
8k views

“Wanting” or “want”?

Lately I have noticed that a lot of people use "wanting" in sentences, or in books, but I don't get it because my English teachers have always said to me that with verbs like "love", "like", "want" ...
2
votes
2answers
289 views

Which tense should I use in this situation? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Using the gerund two times in a row Here is the sentence: Just as on smoking, voices now come from many quarters (insisting or insist) that the science about ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

“This video shows a heart transplant take place” or “taking place”?

Which is the correct version of this sentence: This video shows a heart transplant take place. This video shows a heart transplant taking place. I have a hunch that both are correct, ...
2
votes
2answers
19k views

Verb+ing as a verb beginning a sentence

Is this good English? Falling into the ocean, the drop dies as a drop, but not as water. Or should I say: When it falls into the ocean, the drop dies...
2
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2answers
49 views

Is “People exercising everyday are healthy” wrong?

Can a present participle be used like present progressive adjectives to talk about general nouns? Is this sentence right? People exercising everyday are healthy. or do I need to use ...
2
votes
2answers
148 views

“I saw him playing football”

In this sentence, is "playing football" a participle phrase describing the object "him", or is "him playing football" all a gerund phrase functioning as the object? The problem with English grammar ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
2
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2answers
2k views

I've been seeing good movies or I've been watching good movies? [duplicate]

what would you rather say? Which one is correct? Thanks,Herman.
2
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1answer
2k views

Present participle vs. past participle

How to distinguish the difference between the two of them? For example, in the following sentence: Local times, originating from X and perpetuated by Y, have been abolished. Why can I not use ...
2
votes
3answers
536 views

Can we use to-infinitive after 'have trouble'?

Given the example: I have trouble speaking English. Can we use both present participle (speaking) and to-infinitive (to speak) after have trouble? If both are allowed, do the two have the same ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

“Before/ while/ after ordering a taxi…” are these identical constructions?

"Before ordering a taxi...", and "After ordering a taxi..."; the noun-verb follows a preposition and is a gerund. "Waiting for a taxi, patience is needed." Or "Waiting for a taxi, I dropped my ...
2
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3answers
98 views

Grammatical structure of the given sentence

I was reading Harry Potter I. I stumbled over a sentence, written there, whose overall meaning was clear to me but grammatical structure was not clear at all. Here is the sentence: "Mr. Dursley ...
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3answers
531 views

Is “X supposing to be” proper English?

The whole point that him pretending to be rich is to get a date. The whole point of this supposing to be a big wall is to hold off the barbarians. The first one seems correct, the second ...
1
vote
3answers
7k views

When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
1
vote
1answer
58 views

Not sure if this is correct or not: “the ability to be able to”

The sentence: Problems are an inevitable part of life, and one could argue that happiness is not the absence of problems, but rather the ability to be able to deal with them. Is it to be ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

He spent $300 Ving

I made up the following sentence: He spent $300 talking to a counsellor. But a native speaker said "One doesn't spend $300 in talking to a counsellor. The fees for the session(s) may be $300, ...