Questions about the present-participle form of verbs.

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5answers
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“Wanting” or “want”?

Lately I have noticed that a lot of people use "wanting" in sentences, or in books, but I don't get it because my English teachers have always said to me that with verbs like "love", "like", "want" ...
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0answers
35 views

Use of Present Participle

I am trying to understand how to interpret the meaning of the following sentence, John arrived late to the airport, causing him to miss his flight I know that the present participle modifies the ...
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1answer
38 views

In + pres. participle constructions (“In performing,” “in using”)

I'm working on preparing some text for translation into Spanish and have come across this construction, which sounds perfectly fine to me, but I've been unable to find any definition or description ...
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1answer
53 views

Participle phrases

When I was studying participle phrases, I came across a sentence on a grammar teaching website, which I find trustful.The sentence is : Opening the envelope, I found two concert tickets. And ...
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1answer
97 views

Participles in sentences [duplicate]

I have a question. With regard to present participles such as sleeping, singing or fishing. When used in the following sentences are they functioning as nouns or verbs. I am swimming In my mind, ...
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1answer
31k views

'Seen as' or 'seeing as'

Look at these examples: You should clean the milk seen as you spilt it. You should clean the milk seeing as you spilt it. Which one is correct, and how is it grammatically defined/termed?
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1answer
42 views

“Represent” or “Representing” [closed]

Mr. X approaches each case with a commitment to effectively represent your interests. OR Mr. X approaches each case with a commitment to effectively representing your interests.
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1answer
52 views

Subject of gerund phrase [duplicate]

Me getting a hangover is nothing like her getting a hangover. - I'd rather contemplate you singing than him singing. Is this grammatically correct?
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3answers
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Comma before “including”?

Does this sentence require a comma before including? He has written on a range of moral issues including poverty, globalization, and euthanasia.
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1answer
68 views

He spent $300 Ving

I made up the following sentence: He spent $300 talking to a counsellor. But a native speaker said "One doesn't spend $300 in talking to a counsellor. The fees for the session(s) may be $300, ...
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2answers
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Present Participle or Past Continuous?

A decade ago, nearly a million and a half elephants were living in Africa. Does the word'living' act as a present participle or verb of past continous Please explain it to me.
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2answers
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Is there any rhyme or reason to when one should double the last consonant when adding -ed or -ing? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: focussed or focused? The double consonant Sometimes, final consonants are doubled when adding -ed or -ing to the end of a verb whose penultimate letter is a vowel. ...
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3answers
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When is it acceptable to start a sentence with an “-ing” word?

Here's my example. It is a sentence that begins in the middle of a paragraph and I'm using it as a transition. "Living in Costa Rica also gave me the opportunity to interact with the local ...
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1answer
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Origin of “-ing”

What is the origin of the suffix -ing used to form gerunds and present participles? Why is the suffix the same in both cases?
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2answers
65 views

“The use of” vs. “using”

I am unsure if I can use this two forms interchangeably (simplified sentences): We did that, hence using the object is the only way. We did that, hence the use of the object is the only way. ...
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1answer
51 views

Can I say “Hiking the Lighthouse/Mountain/Jones Path”?

If there is a path called the Lighthouse Path (somewhere at the coast) or Mountain Path or Jones Path (named after somebody who identified it) and I want to hike it, is it correct to say "Hiking the ...
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2answers
122 views

Compelled and compeled - American English

As for the British English it's always taught - compel, compelled, compelling Some of the books/dictionaries say that in American English you say compel, compeled, compeling instead, you simply don't ...
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2answers
82 views

“This video shows a heart transplant take place” or “taking place”?

Which is the correct version of this sentence: This video shows a heart transplant take place. This video shows a heart transplant taking place. I have a hunch that both are correct, ...
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0answers
67 views

Is it correct to say “X is a Y, doing Z”?

Not sure how to best put this in words, but I'll give an example below. This is from a boilerplate text of a company: ABC is a manufacturing company, partnering with DEF to... I would be ...
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1answer
308 views

Present Participle(adjective) vs Progressive tense

Mangoes are refreshing. An adjective form is needed here. But "auxiliary verb" + " verb-ing" act as progressive tense. It may imply that mangoes are refreshing(something, if transitive OR even if ...
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1answer
71 views

where is the verb? [closed]

Where is the verb in this sentence "We are going out to play". Is it "are"? If so what part of speech is "going"? Thanks Michelle
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6answers
930 views

Why are present participle and infinitive equally acceptable for some verbs, but not others

This question about "started teaching/to teach" made me realise that even though the present participle and infinitive are both acceptable after "started", that's not the case with other superficially ...
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3answers
16k views

The adjective “dashing”: can it be used to describe a woman?

Can you say of a woman that she is "dashing", meaning that she looks stupendous, graceful etc.?
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1answer
57 views

A question regarding a parallel

I came across a very neat parallel, but I wonder if I can use the structure today without setting off alarm in an editor's head. A stretch of a series is any piece taken out of it, and not having ...
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1answer
3k views

Gut-wrenching or -retching?

It was the most gut-retching thing I have ever heard. Wrenching sounds like it would make sense, but so does retching.
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4answers
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“-ing” or “which” for description?

I think this sentence is standard English: 1A. John swung his arm wildly, hitting Jane in the head. And it approximately means: 1B John swung his arm wildly and he hit Jane in the head. ...
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3answers
117 views

“It takes” + infinitive vs. present participle

Is it grammatically correct to say "It took me five hours travelling to the US"? Most people would say "It took me five hours to travel to the US." I wonder if the infinitive is always the only ...
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2answers
407 views

Can we use to-infinitive after 'have trouble'?

Given the example: I have trouble speaking English. Can we use both present participle (speaking) and to-infinitive (to speak) after have trouble? If both are allowed, do the two have the same ...
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1answer
913 views

“Heard me [infinitive]” vs. “heard me [present participle]”

"Heard me [infinitive]" vs. "heard me [present participle]" At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talk about it. At that time, you wouldn't have heard me talking about it. At ...
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1answer
120 views

Is a participial phrase at the end of a sentence a dangling modifier?

In this sentence: John walked outside, carrying a jug of water. Is "carrying a jug of water" dangling? If it isn't, what about the sentence: John walked to the car, carrying a jug of water. ...
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1answer
3k views

“Waiting list” vs. “wait list”, “visiting card” vs. “visit card”

Should one say "I’ll put you on the waiting list" or "on the wait list"? Likewise, is it "I will give you my visiting card" or "my visit card"? I am very confused when to use the -ing form or not. Is ...
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2answers
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“UET is engineering a stronger Pakistan”, is it correct to say so?

For a local festival, my university - UET - has written a sentence on the entering gate, that reads as "UET is engineering a stronger Pakistan" According to my knowledge, engine is a verb, and ...
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3answers
2k views

On the difference between “noun + infinitive” and “noun + present participle”

Infinitive and present participle can be used to modify the noun: Infinitive: I had no time to read those books. Present participle: There should be a law banning abortion. In (1), ...
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3answers
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'Should've seen it glow' or 'should've seen it glowing'?

Which one of the following is the correct one? I should have seen it glow. I should have seen it glowing. Or are both correct? Would you parse them please?
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1answer
122 views

Difference between “is to do” and “is doing” [duplicate]

I saw below sentence: Her job is to clean the hall. So can I also say like: Her job is cleaning the hall. It's present participle or gerund? What's the different meaning between these two ...
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1answer
3k views

Participle of “center/centre” in UK English — “centring”? Seriously?

As an American, I was never shocked to see the word "center" spelled as "centre." It didn't bother me at all. Honestly. But then I saw the participle of it spelled as "centring" as opposed to ...
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2answers
2k views

“Rather than doing” vs. “rather than do”

I can't do anything rather than waiting. I can't do anything rather than wait. Which one is correct and why?
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1answer
4k views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
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1answer
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“Are transmitted” vs. “are being transmitted”

After eight bits are [being] transmitted, D must go high for at least one bit time, which is referred to as stop bit. Is "being" required there? Why or why not?
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2answers
14k views

Verb+ing as a verb beginning a sentence

Is this good English? Falling into the ocean, the drop dies as a drop, but not as water. Or should I say: When it falls into the ocean, the drop dies...
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1answer
894 views

What is the function of “doing” in “when doing something”?

Can anyone please explain if "doing" in "When doing something" is a base+ing verbal, or a present participle used as a verb in an elliptical sentence, or something else entirely. Here's an example of ...
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1answer
75 views

“Winner team” vs. “winning team”

I would like to know which of the following fragments is correct when referring to somebody who is part of the team that won a championship: Member of the winning team of... Member of the ...
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3answers
132 views

-ing phrase tag-line?

I'm currently rebuilding a website for a client. On their website, the tag-line reads "Specializing in Manufactured Housing Communities" Is this grammatically correct? In my opinion, ...
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1answer
169 views

Motivated or Motivating

Which answer is correct? The renovation project has been led by a highly _____ group of designers. A) motivated B) motivating If not B, why not?
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1answer
216 views

Which can be true? The importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun

I am confused about the sentence below. Which structure is used: importance of + Ving or the importance of + ADJ + Noun ? In recently years, there has been growing awareness of the importance of ...
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3answers
4k views

Which is correct, “summiting” or “summitting”?

This form of the word is not very common but does see some use as the present participle/gerund of "to summit" as in "Upon summit(t)ing the mountain we took photos but had to begin our descent ...
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1answer
618 views

Meaning of “intriguing” in the following sentence

Reading comprehension is one of the most important parts of any management entrance examination and a bit intriguing as well. Does it mean: Challenging? Interesting? Provocative? All these ...
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1answer
517 views

“All that is needing” vs. “all that is needed”

I've read the following quote from Game of Thrones: Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. English is not my mother ...
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1answer
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Appositive phrase, participle phrase, gerund phrase and noun phrase. English is confusing

"Every English-speaking country is extremely sheepish towards mega-corporations and their puppet-governments. In continental Europe, France being an example, people stand up for their rights ...
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3answers
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Is using past participle instead of present one more polite?

On christianity.stackexchange.com I asked this question: "Is it true that John Paul the Second restored the practice of selling indulgences in 2000?" and one supporter suggested that I replace ...