0
votes
2answers
480 views

“Rather than doing” vs. “rather than do”

I can't do anything rather than waiting. I can't do anything rather than wait. Which one is correct and why?
0
votes
1answer
357 views

“Is missing” vs. “is missed” [closed]

I was wondering why we say "something is missing" instead of "something is missed"? If missed is an adjective then why we use it that way? E.g.: "The sword is missing".
0
votes
1answer
172 views

“Are transmitted” vs. “are being transmitted”

After eight bits are [being] transmitted, D must go high for at least one bit time, which is referred to as stop bit. Is "being" required there? Why or why not?
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“Winner team” vs. “winning team”

I would like to know which of the following fragments is correct when referring to somebody who is part of the team that won a championship: Member of the winning team of... Member of the ...
0
votes
1answer
148 views

“All that is needing” vs. “all that is needed”

I've read the following quote from Game of Thrones: Opening your eyes is all that is needing. The heart lies and the head plays tricks with us, but the eyes see true. English is not my mother ...
-1
votes
1answer
56 views

What is the difference between “Distribution Worker” and “Distributing Worker”?

I cannot differentiate when I should use a noun like "distribution" as an adjective to another noun, or when should I use an "-ing" participle as an adjective. Could you please clarify the differences ...
0
votes
1answer
220 views

Is this past participle to be changed to present participle?

In this sentence, is the past participle of ‘clasped’ in ‘with his hands clasped over his fat bottom’ to be changed to ‘clasping’? He brought the umbrella swishing down through the air to point at ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

“Appealing for” or “appealing to”?

Are there guidelines for when to use to or for with appealing? I was writing this sentence: '... choose a time that is appealing to you', and then thought it was likely for, but either seems to make ...
6
votes
2answers
372 views

“It is fun to write letters” vs. “It is fun writing letters”

Grammatically, "It is fun to write English letters." is correct. But is the following also grammatically correct? It is fun writing English letters.
5
votes
3answers
260 views

'Should've seen it glow' or 'should've seen it glowing'?

Which one of the following is the correct one? I should have seen it glow. I should have seen it glowing. Or are both correct? Would you parse them please?
0
votes
3answers
1k views

Why use 'being' in this sentence?

I came across this sentence in my programming book: There are a number of differences that need to be explained though, the most important one being that read or write accesses to the file ...
2
votes
5answers
2k views

What is the grammatical difference behind “is interesting” and “is interested”?

I am a native English speaker, yet I cannot explain to a non-native speaker why I say: I am interested in history. as well as History is interesting to me. Why is it "is interesting" when ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

Gut-wrenching or -retching?

It was the most gut-retching thing I have ever heard. Wrenching sounds like it would make sense, but so does retching.