Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
0answers
37 views

“Act in a certain way” or “act a certain way”

When I should put "in" after the verb "act"? I occasionally see some don't put "in" between "act" and "a certain way". Example: "But you must act in a certain way, so that you can appropriate what ...
2
votes
0answers
105 views

Is there a solid reference/rule on when not to put article after 'of'

I have not found any articles or documentation on this, the only thing close to it is this Zero article after "of" in "a change of place" thread which only has a single answer ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Does this adverb prepositional phrase modify the adverb, or vice versa?

The McGraw Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage (pg. 42) gives "We got there late in the evening" as an example of an adverb prepositional phrase ('in the evening') modifying an adverb ('late'). ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

What is the appropriate preposition of “Radio programme”?

So, in this sentence I listened to this conversation (On - In) a radio programme. What is the appropriate preposition to use?
1
vote
0answers
20 views

On or upon execution?

To be specific, I want to write something like: "Afterwards, on execution of the script, the solver is compiled and new dependency list files are generated." or "Afterwards, upon execution ...
1
vote
0answers
35 views

Usage of “of” prepositions sequence

Today, I have encountered the following sentence in a documentation: Department of development and support of information systems of ABC JSC I have argued about the correctness of using this "...
1
vote
0answers
38 views

Arrive “by” or “on” a specific train?

I happened to read a "programme of visit" of a foreign delegation which stated that the delegation would arrive in [name of city] by train H702. Obviously, H702 is the designation of a specific train. ...
1
vote
0answers
65 views

University AT city name

I was wondering if anyone would care to explain why some universities use AT in their names (University of Illinois AT Chicago/ University AT Buffalo) when the preposition used with cities is usually ...
1
vote
0answers
41 views

“The grades I have earned in/on/during my exchange semester”?

I guess the title explains my dilemma fully :) (perhaps it's important to note I'm writing an US English text). Thanks a lot!
1
vote
0answers
187 views

Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
1
vote
0answers
86 views

Usage of from, in and at with reference to place of learning

I am slightly confused about the usage of "from" "at" and "in". He was born in England He studied at XXX School, Delhi He did his schooling from XXX School, Delhi All of these seem to be ...
1
vote
0answers
88 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
1
vote
0answers
63 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Confused about the use of “to” in a quote

The former Manchester United star has now hit a record 25 La Liga hat-tricks and has 45 goals this term to lead Lionel Messi by three in the race for the Pichichi. I am confused as to the ...
1
vote
0answers
110 views

Is it recommended to include a preposition when listing several components of a sentence in parallel?

Consider the sample sentence below (quoted from a manual Here): When you evaluate a list, the Lisp interpreter looks at the first symbol in the list and then at the function definition bound to ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Go to page OR Go at page

I have an easy question! In British English you open a book AT page 15, whereas in AE you open a book TO page 15. Another very similar expression we can use is:" open your book and go TO/AT page 15",...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

“Match with” or “Match”

I read some threads about using match but I could not reach a conclusion on whether I have to use match or "match with," or "match to" in my context: The experiment showed that the results ...
0
votes
0answers
54 views

Prepositions before participle clauses

I am currently studying participle clauses that have adverbial meaning, and was faced with something that I'm having a hard time understanding. In "Advanced Grammar In Use," the book I'm studying ...
0
votes
0answers
15 views

“at” or “with”--which is correct?

Which is correct---or are they both correct? I am angry at the boss. I am angry with the boss. I am upset at the boss. I am upset with the boss.
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Does “the wind pushed it on with the others” mean?

does "the tiny seed is flying very low, but the wind pushed it on with the others" mean 1) "the tiny seed is flying very low and the others is flying high and the wind pushed the only tiny seed on." ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Difference in meaning between “taking it out on you” and “taking it out you”?

What is the difference in meaning between "taking it out on you" and "taking it out you" in the sentence "You’re stuffing the wrong things into your stomach, and your stomach is taking it out on you" ?...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

What is the correct preposition: on or in?

Is it “on WhatsApp” or “in WhatsApp”? Like, “text on WhatsApp” or “text in WhatsApp”? Please, can anyone clear up this doubt of mine. P.S I know it's on in case of Facebook but is it on for ...
0
votes
0answers
48 views

manufacturing process vs process for manufacturing

Question: Is it idiomatic to say "a manufacturing process of/for a high-precision lens" in place of "a process for manufacturing a high-precision lens"? In connection with this question, I've ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Which sentence is more appropriate grammatically?

I was typing an e-mail. The confusion is between preposition "enroll in" and "enroll at". In which sentence has this preposition "enroll" been used correctly? I have enrolled in a university. I ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

pay attention at + gerund

Is this sentence correct, in regards to the use of pay attention "at" instead of pay attention "to"? They should pay more attention at identifying and rewarding skilled resources and talent, by ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Preposition at the end of a question

Are the prepositions at the end of these sentences necessary? And why/why not? Where are you at? Where did it originate from? Where did you come from?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Preposition choice adjectives

What's the right sentence ? People were embarrassed OF the result of their team who played badly or People were embarrassed BY the result of their team who played badly ? Thank you so much
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Usage of the word “as”

Is it okay to use a single "as" in a sentence? "Before, the government would always intervene. Now, it isn't as involved." Or should I say: "In the past, the government would always intervene. Now, ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

In and Out : Differently uses prepositions

Why does "out" take a preposition while "in" doesn't? Like in: I'm out of this game and I'm in this game
0
votes
0answers
17 views

By option? Per option?

When we try to decide which item to buy, we measure each potential selection against the criteria most important to us (quality, cost, etc), and choose the option that most accurately meets our needs. ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

May “in with” be used to mean “among?”

I was thinking about how little I use the word among and how I would phrase the dictionary's example sentences for it. Most of it involved substitution with the word with. Then I noticed something. ...
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Ellipsis (Gapping) and Prepositions

A simple example of ellipsis is: Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary oranges. (Peter likes to eat apples, and Mary [likes to eat] oranges.) Recently, I've been engaged in a debate about a ...
0
votes
0answers
63 views

different from vs. different to vs. different than

I learned from a British person that "different from" is an American English, and "different than" is the most commonly used in Britain. Moreover I found "different to". What are differences of the ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Can all dynamic (action) verbs be paired up with all existing prepositions to form compound verbs?, ie. “Throw- out,off,in, up, etc.”

I know that not all verbs can be compounded with all prepositions such as, "Believe-out, of, from, up, down." being a stative verb; and that action verbs can be paired up with lamost all prepositions. ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Can “for” and “by” be used interchangeably with a gerund?

Is it correct to say "You can earn rewards for participating in the company's wellness program?" I'm inclined to change it to "You can earn rewards by participating in the company's wellness program....
0
votes
0answers
68 views

at / on/ in (the) (Math) exam

I think it is common to say I did well on the exam in AmE. I did well in the exam in BrE. Which prepositions are suitable for the following situations in which if we mention the exam we ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Is there any difference between 'to affiliate with' and 'to affiliate to'?

When I was looking up the word 'affiliate', the dictionary offered the example sentences which I've been really confused from. The actual meaning of the word 'affiliate' is to cause a group to ...
0
votes
0answers
106 views

Which are the correct prepositions before the word “year” in the following phrase?

In the phrase, "on Saturday the twenty-third day of April in the year two thousand and sixteen" Is it more correct to say "in the year two thousand and sixteen" or "in the year of two thousand ...
0
votes
0answers
95 views

An exercise of in, on and at (time), Oxford Practice Grammar 2nd unit 120

The exercise is as follows. We're leaving ___ half past, and you haven't even changed. My answer is in. However, the reference answer is at. The sentence seems that we are about to leave in 30 ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Use of preposition 'for'

Is the usage of the word 'for' correct in the following sentence: I am on preplanned leave for tomorrow.
0
votes
0answers
38 views

Which preposition is best: Efficacy of a model in predicting or efficacy of a model for predicting?

I'd like to use this phrase in a sentence, but I'm not sure whether 'in' or 'for' is more appropriate: Efficacy of a model in predicting Efficacy of a model for predicting Example: what is the ...
0
votes
0answers
38 views

“OF” between the subject and the verb “seem”?

When reading "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," I came across the sentences as following: "'They of seem so helpless and frail. But there are none in the forest so bright as these.'" What is this "of" ...
0
votes
0answers
65 views

preposition with.. 'care' for/about

Which one should I use? I care for/about you. He does not care for/about his health. And what exactly is the difference between the two while using them?
0
votes
0answers
48 views

Cracking your head to find OR Cracking your head over?

Which is the right way to say it? Got caught in a disagreement over this blog title. Example usage: Cracking your head to find the perfect Christmas gifts? Vs Cracking your head over the ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

How would one specify that Noun 2 in “[Prepositional phrase] [Noun 1] and [Noun 2]” is not an object of the prepositional phrase?

I will give an example of this problem. In fact, this example is the reason why I am asking! I am blending a quote taken from a book into an assignment on which I am currently working. (Don't worry, I ...
0
votes
0answers
129 views

Proper preposition in 'Are you busy coming week?'

When I make a sentence: Are you busy coming week? which preposition should I put between busy and coming week?
0
votes
0answers
286 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
0
votes
0answers
37 views

What are the differences between “come on down” and “come down”?

"I answered the phone in my apartment and heard the sloping drawl of one of my students , Travis." Miss Diana, " he said, "Could you come on down the stairs a minute?" It was early May on the ...