Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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3answers
25 views

“Before” vs. “ahead of” vs. “in front of” vs. “in the front of”

What are the differences between before, ahead of, in front of, and in the front of? In which situations should I use which?
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2answers
54 views

“For/during/on/in the first two nights”

He slept very well for the first two nights, but on the third night, he did not. Can I say “in the first two nights”, “during the first two nights” or “on the first two nights” instead of “for ...
2
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1answer
53 views

Is the “to” required in “the person (to) whom I granted freedom”?

I had this phrase "the person whom I granted freedom" in something I wrote; a friend maintains that it must be "the person to whom I granted freedom."
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1answer
32 views

Do I use commas before the word “to” in the following sentence:

The JP-8 pipelines included 7.4 miles of parallel 10-inch pipelines from the Navy's transfer pump house manifold to the custody transfer to the Anderson Air Force Base.
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1answer
27 views

The difference between 'protect from' and 'protect against'

The Longman dictionary suggests two options regarding the word 'protect': protect somebody/something from something and protect somebody/something against something/ Examples: The cover protects the ...
0
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1answer
65 views

Is it correct to use preposition “by”

Is it correct to use the preposition "by" in such a context: If within this period Mr X makes no claims on the work quality by writing them in the certificate, then ... I meant that Mr X can ...
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1answer
59 views

A synonym for “over” in “over a distance”

Could you give me the best synonym for over in this situation? Aqueduct: artificial channel for conducting water over a distance. I know it is the best preposition for this context. But I wonder ...
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1answer
51 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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1answer
506 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
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1answer
253 views

Parallel structures problem with their prepositions and helping verbs

This might clear it up. It is not about reducing the consumption of sugars or carbohydrates but about moderating the consumption of them. Does this work correctly? Another example: Any ...
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1answer
128 views

Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”?

Is it right to say: We take pride in doing what we are best at, delivering unsurpassed levels of service, so our customers can do what they are best at.
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1answer
182 views

Omission of the word “to”

Following is an excerpt from Michelle Dean's post in The Newyorker (my emphasis): “One of the reasons Hank and I have always resisted being on television is that we don’t really want nerdfighters ...
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1answer
224 views

Using the FANBOYS “for” in a series

I have a sentence that is constructed the same as this one: She bought food for a black cat, a white horse, a red dog, and a green frog. However, I feel the comma does not give enough pause for ...
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1answer
190 views

'Of ' in the line 'I really felt quite distressed of not receiving an invitation.'

This is a line I encountered in Sleeping Beauty, cried by the malevolent fairy when she found out she was not invited to the celebration of the new-born princess. Question: What kind of grammatical ...
0
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0answers
38 views

What preposition does “rate … criteria” take?

I'm writing up specs for a website with learning materials for our alpha testers to comment on. Among others, I'm describing the rating system: the materials can be rated (...) several criteria (such ...
0
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0answers
42 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case?

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
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0answers
28 views

“To predicate” + of or + as or + some other preposition

I'm interested in Definition 1.1 at Oxford Dictionaries which exemplifies "predicated of." Yet, would "predicate as" be equally correct? Google Ngram depicts a difference, but not Google Books ...
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0answers
35 views

correct preposition

I'm preparing a short paragraph for testing my students reading skills. The title is: "Spanish And English United by a Song" or should I choose "Spanish and English United in a Song"? My students are ...