Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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demanded by or demanded for

I doubt about the correct preposition here. Which sentence should I use if it is the engineers themselves who are clamouring for the equipment? This instrument is highly demanded for engineers ...
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680 views

Is “offer something someone” without “to” in between correct?

I interpret the latter part of the following sentence to mean "and are quite unprepared to offer the priority seats to those whom the seats are meant for." If this is correct, "to" seems to be missing ...
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24 views

Deterioration in vs deterioration of

Is it better to say, 'the injury caused a deterioration in his physical function', or 'the injury caused a deterioration of his physical functioning'?
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42 views

What's the etymology of 'of' after verbs?

(TL;DR) While reading about preposition of on OED (eg avail of, enquire of), I encountered a possible explanation: quoted below, OED claims that the postverbal of originates from the genitive case, ...
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1answer
95 views

What preposition to use with file extensions?

Basically, should I mentally decode file extension abbreviations, and thus: Documents in PDF (in format) Photos according to JPEG (... group) Alternatives: Shall I keep it as PDF? Could ...
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1answer
95 views

Prepositional madness! Of, or in?

This has been bothering me for the last day or so. Would you say: "I have a mind to send him a strongly-worded letter, just to see if he can read five words of it." Or: "I have a mind to ...
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76 views

Usage of preposition 'in' - St Petersburg at night

Which is the correct form of the following caption for a photo: Night beauty in St Petersburg St Petersburg night beauty Or does the right sentence have to be "A night beauty in St ...
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144 views

Meaning of “up” and “off” in “I live up north off some_region”

I am only familiar with sentences like I live in New York I live on the north side of New York I guess I live up north off some_region. means the place I live in is a little bit ...
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19 views

Prepositions usage: In vs For

There is a topic for a scientific paper in which I think the usage of the preposition "In" is incorrect; that is: Admissible Observation Operators in a Flexible Beam Technically, we can ...
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24 views

“He weeps at school.” and “He weeps in school.” are both alright and the same meaning?

I wonder whether both sentence A and sentence B are correct and the same thing or not. Sentence A => "He weeps at school." Sentence B => "He weeps in school." Thanks.
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18 views

go at it with everything you've got vs go for it with everything you've got

go at it with everything you've got vs go for it with everything you've got From the dictionary, I understand "go at" means undertake and tackle while "go for" means go after with maximum efforts. I ...
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50 views

“in” vs “on” vs “at” with “rarely used code paths”

Which of these alternatives is the best one? Bugs are often found on rarelly used code paths Bugs are often found in rarelly used code paths Bugs are often found at rarelly used code paths I have ...
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31 views

Keep on discussing vs Keep on discussing it

We kept discussing. We kept discussing whether God exists. Is an object (in this case, God's existence) necessary in this sentence? For example, with writing, it seems that an object ...
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68 views

Is “out of” instead of “from” colloquial, always okay or simply wrong?

Here an example sentence written by a pupil of mine: Through the British Empire, which resulted out of Britain's urge to build up its economy, Britain was connected to a lot of different countries ...
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71 views

“Around” and/or “About”

I know it is right to state: Is the teacher around ? But is it equally right to state: Is the teacher about ? I have heard native English speakers say the latter, but is it correct?
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48 views

Difference among “to hear”, “to hear of” and “to hear about”?

Will anyone kindly explain the difference between the three terms to me? Thanks.
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166 views

“father to” vs. “father of”

Would it be grammatically correct to write Mister X is father to a son and a daughter or should one preferably choose the preposition of? Mister X is father of a son and a daughter. ...
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1answer
45 views

In + pres. participle constructions (“In performing,” “in using”)

I'm working on preparing some text for translation into Spanish and have come across this construction, which sounds perfectly fine to me, but I've been unable to find any definition or description ...
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96 views

“Classify data in A/B/C by value x by using the function x”

This is about data classification done by computer. Data is classified into the A, B, or C rank and then the judgement result will be displayed on the screen. All the transaction is done by using ...
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193 views

sentence formation and use of preposition

how would we say "to transfer something in somebody's name" for e.g. in sentence i would "transfer the property paper in/to/on your name" Is there a better way. Thanks in anticipation
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116 views

A synonym for “over” in “over a distance”

Could you give me the best synonym for over in this situation? Aqueduct: artificial channel for conducting water over a distance. I know it is the best preposition for this context. But I wonder ...
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281 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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1answer
3k views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
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1answer
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Parallel structures problem with their prepositions and helping verbs

This might clear it up. It is not about reducing the consumption of sugars or carbohydrates but about moderating the consumption of them. Does this work correctly? Another example: Any ...
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153 views

Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”?

Is it right to say: We take pride in doing what we are best at, delivering unsurpassed levels of service, so our customers can do what they are best at.
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33 views

“Wait one hour for her” versus “wait for one hour for her”

For example, given: I had to wait one hour for room service, I had to wait for one hour for room service. I managed to google “to wait one hour for” and “to wait for one hour for”. Both searches ...
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'Of ' in the line 'I really felt quite distressed of not receiving an invitation.'

This is a line I encountered in Sleeping Beauty, cried by the malevolent fairy when she found out she was not invited to the celebration of the new-born princess. Question: What kind of grammatical ...
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What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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44 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
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Confused about the use of “to” in a quote

The former Manchester United star has now hit a record 25 La Liga hat-tricks and has 45 goals this term to lead Lionel Messi by three in the race for the Pichichi. I am confused as to the ...
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49 views

to switch up, to change Up - why are these now taking the preposition up?

Does anyone know the root of the emergence of usage of the preposition "up" with the verbs "to switch" and "to change"?
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603 views

Determining if “than” is used as conjunction or preposition

"than" can be used as a conjunction and as a preposition. I want to be able to tell for any given sentence containing "than" which grammatical function it has in that sentence. My current ...
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38 views

Burn a hole in the road?

my question is: In Marry The Night's lyrics, Lady Gaga sings "I'm gonna burn a hole in the road". Why is that? I've heard the expression "on the road" but not "in the road". I don't speak English ...
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Usage of prepositions

I've come across this sentence: Its current market value would astound its builders, but then so would much else about its leafy neighborhood. I understand that the builders would be astounded ...
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Choosing a preposition: A train TO/FOR class

What is the correct preposition to use in this case? For example, in the sentence "I usually study in the park before taking the train for class", should we replace the for with to? Or are they both ...
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33 views

Usage of 'on' preposition before words like 'next'/'previous'

As I found out on the internet and this site, usually the preposition on before words like week/month name or just in a phrase such as: [something-something] next week is not used. However, I ...
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71 views

prepositions “in” and “at” with school subjects

I came across a phrase: "My brother is first in Maths" Is it possible to say "he is first at Maths" instead of "he is first in Maths"? I thought that I should say "at" when I speak about somebody's ...
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when “near” could be considered incorrect grammatically or semantically

Let's verify the word "nearby" is part of a constituent NP in the OP's #2 example: OP.2a. I live in a town nearby. <-- OP's #2 example it-clefts: OP.2b. It is [in a town nearby] that I live. ...
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61 views

Should it be on or over?

From Aljazeera News: Saudi Arabia's foreign minister has said the kingdom is ready "to take necessary measures if needed" over Yemen's political crisis, after denouncing Iran's alleged role in the ...
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Function of “about”- practised physiotherapy for about 6 months

I practised physiotherapy for about 6 months. I understand that "about" can take forms such as an adv, adj, preposition. Though I can rephrase the sentence, however, I am curious to find out ...
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51 views

Place of “either” for different propositions

I want to work on either X or Y. I have to change that sentence this way: I want to work either on X or in the realm of Y. Is there any problem with it? I am doubtful about the proper ...
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85 views

Countries “of the world” or “in the world”

How should I say: There are many threats faced by almost all countries IN the world or There are many threats faced by almost all countries OF the world I used to say "IN the world". ...
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The meaning of “going over” something

I'm fond of old especially folk songs, but as a foreigner I often have troubles interpreting some phrases. Here is one from Wayfaring stranger: I'm going there to see my father I'm going there no ...
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85 views

Is there a comprehensive look at articles of dress and their prepositions

As mentioned in the title, I'm looking for a comprehensive answer to the question of which prepositions go with different articles of clothing: e.g., in/with a tie; in/with a hat; in/with gloves, ...
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correct usage and punctuation of a nonrestrictive clause with which?

S1: John was a worker at Bread Store, of which I was the manager, when he lived here. S2: John was a worker at Bread Store, which I was the manager of, when he lived here. What's the correct usage? ...
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570 views

“Provided to us” or “Provided us”?

Both the sentences/fragments below appear to be grammatical. Thanks for the help you have provided to us in the planning Thanks for the help you have provided us in the planning Is there ...
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Recommended sources for understanding the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions

Can anyone recommend to me a good book and any other sources where I can study in detail the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions? Since I am a visual learner, I would love to find ...
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“To How” or “In How”?

I have the sentence: "Since that experience, I have made changes to how I address all of my courses." Should I use "to how" or "in how" for any grammatical reason(s), or is it simply a matter of ...
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Is it recommended to include a preposition when listing several components of a sentence in parallel?

Consider the sample sentence below (quoted from a manual Here): When you evaluate a list, the Lisp interpreter looks at the first symbol in the list and then at the function definition bound to ...
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What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...