Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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62 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
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2answers
161 views

“My interest in becoming” vs. “my interest to become”

I was writing a letter of application for a university. I wanted to start my letter by writing: I am writing this letter to express my interest in becoming part... and then I got confused. I am ...
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2answers
71 views

“For/during/on/in the first two nights”

He slept very well for the first two nights, but on the third night, he did not. Can I say “in the first two nights”, “during the first two nights” or “on the first two nights” instead of “for ...
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1answer
103 views

What’s difference between “in” + VERBing compared with just plain VERBing alone?

In the following example from page 145 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer, what would differ if the sentence were to start with Being instead of In being? In being an empirical ...
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1answer
98 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
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1answer
28 views

Does one include a comma after the last proposition in a list of multiple preposition-verb pairs

Should I do this: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about, UX. Or should I remove the last comma: The developers are less experienced in, or passionate about UX. This ...
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1answer
100 views

I grew up IN the east coast vs ON the east coast

I cannot understand why there is "in" in the sentence "I grew up in the east coast..." - why it is not "on"? Google search provides results for both with quite high number of hits.
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1answer
49 views

“over the period of” or “over the period”?

Which one is correct? I visited four countries over the period of 2010 to 2014. or I visited four countries over the period 2010 to 2014.
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1answer
62 views

Necessity of “in” and “the”?

Please let me know which sentence is correct. I have faced the first and third one in the Longman dictionary, but dictionaries are prone to typos and errors. So I couldn't be sure which one is correct ...
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1answer
104 views

Is the “by” correct in “makes no claims by writing them”?

Is it correct to use the preposition "by" in such a context: If within this period Mr X makes no claims on the work quality by writing them in the certificate, then ... I meant that Mr X can ...
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1answer
41 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
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1answer
32 views

Using conjunction “while” as an archaic prepositonal form for “until”

In my Penguin English Dictionary, I've encountered the word while marked as an archaic form for the preposition until. Furthermore, according to my online research, Oxford Dictionary states that it is ...
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1answer
59 views

sentence formation and use of preposition

how would we say "to transfer something in somebody's name" for e.g. in sentence i would "transfer the property paper in/to/on your name" Is there a better way. Thanks in anticipation
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1answer
70 views

A synonym for “over” in “over a distance”

Could you give me the best synonym for over in this situation? Aqueduct: artificial channel for conducting water over a distance. I know it is the best preposition for this context. But I wonder ...
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1answer
85 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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1answer
700 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
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1answer
295 views

Parallel structures problem with their prepositions and helping verbs

This might clear it up. It is not about reducing the consumption of sugars or carbohydrates but about moderating the consumption of them. Does this work correctly? Another example: Any ...
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1answer
134 views

Which is the preposition to go with “best”? Is it “best at”?

Is it right to say: We take pride in doing what we are best at, delivering unsurpassed levels of service, so our customers can do what they are best at.
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1answer
207 views

Omission of the word “to”

Following is an excerpt from Michelle Dean's post in The Newyorker (my emphasis): “One of the reasons Hank and I have always resisted being on television is that we don’t really want nerdfighters ...
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1answer
275 views

Using the FANBOYS “for” in a series

I have a sentence that is constructed the same as this one: She bought food for a black cat, a white horse, a red dog, and a green frog. However, I feel the comma does not give enough pause for ...
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1answer
281 views

'Of ' in the line 'I really felt quite distressed of not receiving an invitation.'

This is a line I encountered in Sleeping Beauty, cried by the malevolent fairy when she found out she was not invited to the celebration of the new-born princess. Question: What kind of grammatical ...
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0answers
35 views

Question about prepositions/conjunctions (from, to…)

Can you please tell which (if any) of the following is correct? Where are you coming from?/From where are you coming? Who will you give it to?/To whom will you give it? What for?/For ...
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0answers
121 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
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26 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
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28 views

“for + noun phrase” vs “of + noun phrase”

presumptive (adj) 1.1 Law Giving grounds for the inference of a fact or of the appropriate interpretation of the law. Would someone please explain why of precedes the second noun phrase (the ...