Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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When do you leave out the preposition in a relative clause?

A non-fiction titled "Do the Right Thing" published in 1998 has this sentence: (1) Am I treating this stranger with the same consideration that I would a friend? Another book (fiction) titled ...
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Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
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Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
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Preposition and tense-Homework

In today's exam, I had few grammar questions. I am doubtful in two questions. Please check my answers and correct the mistakes, if any. 1.Fill with suitable prepositions. There lived _ _ _ _ _ a ...
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'of' or 'by' or 'from'

I have a sentence that contains the phrase We support products of different manufacturers [...] Is the use of 'of' correct there? A coworker said I should use 'by' and I also can think of 'from' as ...
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50 views

The use of “for” with the verb “to crave”

My gut feeling tells me one says "I crave chocolate" and not "I crave for chocolate". This was confirmed for example at this forum discussion. However, google also showed me the sentence "I crave for ...
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51 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
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1answer
77 views

Why “on the books”, not “in the books”

On the books means "part of the law". These changes would add little to the civil rights laws now on the books. I know the meaning of this idiom, and idioms are used as they are, but idioms ...
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Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
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Greeting on a website: Welcome to Index Page of … or Welcome on Index Page [on hold]

What preposition should I use when saying hello to the user on the main page? Should I write: Welcome to Index Page of... or Welcome on Index Page of...?
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1answer
46 views

When you have a sentence containing a list separated by commas, do you need to repeat the verb before a preposition?

I.E. Which of these is correct? A. You are cool, funny, and among the most popular of students at this school. B. You are cool, funny, and are among the most popular of students at this school. ...
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In June–July 1967? Between June–July 1967?

Which is correct and which is not? In June--July 1967, there were... Between June--July 1967, there were... Between June and July 1967, there were... If I want to use "June--July 1967", how can I ...
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4answers
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“My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow” (grammar of 'to dinner')

My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow. The meaning is clear. However, if you think about it, what this seems to literally say is that the aunt is going directly to some dinner (and not even an ...
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1answer
9k views

“No point in” vs. “no point of” vs. “no point to”

Point in, point of, point to. (Point in the sense of "purpose".) What are the differences among these — in meaning? in usage (each is used in certain constructions or with certain ...
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2answers
54 views

What does this usage of “with” mean? [on hold]

I'm sorry for asking what will be such a simple question but I'm not sure exactly how With is used in sentences where that's the first word. Is that what it took to fall in love with someone? ...
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What preposition should one use with “redundant”?

I realize it's usually better to just say "A and B are redundant". But, I've also seen A is redundant with B ... to B ... of B all with basically the same intended meaning. Are any of these more ...
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232 views

“over the period of” or “over the period”?

Which one is correct? I visited four countries over the period of 2010 to 2014. or I visited four countries over the period 2010 to 2014.
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Issue brought up in the meeting or at the meeting? [closed]

Which preposition is correct? In the meeting or at the meeting when I am trying to say Issues brought up in the meeting will be discussed within 5 working days. should I say at the meeting ...
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1answer
55 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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2answers
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“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
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2answers
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Can the word “proxy” be used as a preposition?

At the end of a sentence, I want to insert the following (parentheses included): (proxy my parents, of course). E.g., I sent my brother to his room (proxy my parents, of course). But this ...
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39 views

“Habitat selection in/of birds”, “concept in/of statistics”, “theme in/of evolution”

It seems to me that in and of work equally well in sentences such as these: Habitat selection in birds is frequently studied. Habitat selection of birds is frequently studied. ...
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4answers
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“In” vs. “of” after the superlative form of adjectives

Hanna's the youngest member of the team. Why isn't it "in the team"? The rule that we covered in out textbook New Total English pre-intermediate says that we use in with groups of people and ...
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“Permanent resident in/of America” [closed]

When conveying this on foreign soil, which of these is correct usage: Permanent Resident of America Permanent Resident in America
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“Made of” vs “made from”

An English book tells me that the following sentence is correct: This publication is made from paper from sustainable forests. Shouldn't it be of paper instead?
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Prepositions: “The confusing widgets of language”

The title is adapted from an article in THE WEEK, written by James Harbeck. Well worth reading if you ask me. I don't particularly like prepositions. They are small, seemingly insignificant things ...
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86 views

What does “straight out of [person]” mean?

I know the meaning of the straight out. But what does it mean with of? For example: It’s straight out of Alice Miller.
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Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...
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Document “from” or “of” year 1988

If I refer to a document that was written in 1988, which is correct? The document of 1988 mentions the birth of a legend. or The document from 1988 mentions the birth of a legend.
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60 views

Are any of these terms correct? “Known with” or “known by”

Suppose a famous building, i.e. a stadium, a concert hall, etc., known as a landmark in a place, being sponsored by a company, such that people may happen to use the company name instead of the ...
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Are prepositions a part of grammar or vocabulary?

If I you fill in the blanks with prepositions, is it a grammar exercise or a vocabulary exercise, e.g. He was here ______ the morning.
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“via” vs. “through”

Could you please explain what the difference in usage is between through and via, which sounds like a Latinism? Are they completely interchangeable?
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Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
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“They have been replaced by…” or “They have been replaced with…”

We replace something old with something new. The Mayor has replaced all the old school buses with new ones. When the sentence is written in the passive voice, "by" is used. All the ...
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Should we worry about what precedes a preposition?

Should we always worry about what precedes a preposition? Many times we come across people concerned with what preposition comes after a certain word. A preposition's raison d'être is qualifying ...
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What is the right preposition after “skeptical”?

Which preposition is suitable to follow skeptical?
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'Given by' vs 'Given with'

Is this sentence correct? The equation of a line is given with [SOME EQUATION] ... I want to use it instead of: The equation of a line is given by [SOME EQUATION] ... Can I use 'with' ...
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Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”?

My relative is a fairly big academic and works at a university. Is this correct? or should I have used in instead?
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What preposition is the proper one to follow the noun “hatred”?

What is the proper preposition to follow the noun hatred? Do we have a hatred for Buddhism? Do we have a hatred of Buddhism? Do we have a hatred against Buddhism? These are all just examples. ...
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What is the appropriate preposition for “mailing list”?

I am trying to write a motivation letter and in this sentence I am not sure which preposition is appropriate for "mailing list". Would you please help me? To clarify the case, I am subscribed to a ...
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Do you buy “in”, “by”, “at” or “on” a website"? [duplicate]

If test.com is my website name, which one is correct: In test.com you can buy biscuits By test.com you can buy biscuits How can I explain to someone that if you register on my site you can do ...
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47 views

Can “unto” be used instead of “onto” in American English?

Is there a difference in how the preposition "onto" is used in British and American English? I always understood it to match the following dictionary definition I found online, and was not aware of ...
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691 views

Graduate student in or of?

In my cover letter I want to write that I am a graduate student in statistics. But I am not sure about the "in". So what is correct? I am a graduate student in statistics. I am a graduate ...
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The expression 'not that bad of a'

In an essay, a friend used the expression: It wasn't that bad of an idea. I think that it would be preferable to write It wasn't that bad an idea However, I can't explain why.
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“between” vs. “among”

Today I was cut off in the middle of the following sentence: Between Cook, Strauss, and Pietersen— My friend said I was wrong. He said that for more than two entities, among/amongst are used, ...
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Why “live on campus” but not “live in campus”

Why do we say he lives on campus but not he lives in campus? Technically we live in the boundaries of the campus.
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2answers
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Floating in/on atmosphere?

Which of the following two are correct? Melodies floating in relaxing atmosphere. Melodies floating on relaxing atmosphere. My gut feeling says that it should be 1, but I am just a bit confused. ...
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'from' vs. 'by'

Reading a science article on HuffPost, titled 'Dinosaur Farts, Prehistoric Climate Change Linked In New Methane Gas Study', I came across the following sentence: The gassy emissions from these ...
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Which preposition should be used when referring to an exact date?

I read this in a text book: My test is on 22th of June. I saw this in a YouTube tutorial: My test is at 22th of June. Which sentence uses the right preposition?
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What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...