Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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What are the proper location prepositions when writing out a wedding invitation in longhand?

I am trying to write my wedding invitation out in long hand, "The honour of your presence is requested at the marriage of Miss First Middle Last to Doctor First Middle Last on Saturday the ...
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4answers
27 views

Can I substitute 'to' for 'for' here in order to not repeat 'for' twice

I'm trying to rewrite this sentence, can someone suggest a grammatically correct (and better) sentence: I was not prepared for his calm enthusiasm for my question. I'm thinking something like: ...
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1answer
63 views

“On” and “Off” for Lights, Electrical Switches, etc

Simple question: Why were the prepositions "on" and "off" used for things like "The lights are on" and "The computer is off", and when did these words gain their new usage? I'm guessing back in the ...
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2answers
58 views

accused of a sin for a behaviour

The appropriate preposition for the verb 'accuse' is 'of'. However, sometimes the verb accuse has three objects: when we accuse a person of a crime/sin/inappropriate behavior because something he has ...
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1answer
129 views

Grammatical usage of prepositions: before or after “not only …but also…”

Which one is more universal, before or after "not only...but also..."? I saw a sentence in an article: ...masters were responsible not only for teaching their apprentices a trade but also ...
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2answers
19 views

In / From correct usage

I have a doubt. According to English Language what is the correct form of the following ? Thanks in advance. Look that from your own eyes ? OR Look that in your own eyes ?
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34 views

Responsible of/for? [migrated]

I know that "responsible for" is common but I wonder what happens if I say, "Hitler is responsible of the massacre of Jews"? I think that when one blames someone for something, using "of" makes ...
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5answers
23k views

“Excel at something” vs. “excel in something”

I've come across a question while writing an exam Roger really excelled ___ sports A) at B) on C) in D) for My first thought was 'in', later I remembered using 'at' also. I've ...
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2answers
48 views

Using “across” after preposition “to”?

English is not my first language, and I often lose my confidence when I use across in my sentence. Could you please give me an advice on the sentence that I have written below? Health education ...
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3answers
17k views

“For how long have you been…” vs. “how long have you been…”

Ante-scriptum: The question should be quite a frequently arising one, so this might be a duplicate. If it is, I haven't found it previously asked here I don't know if the title is meaningful, but ...
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1answer
45 views

How common is the use of 'although' as a preposition rather than a conjunction?

Conceding a point can be expressed by means of – an adverb (however, nevertheless, etc); – a preposition + the point in noun form (despite this, in spite of this, despite the fact that, etc); ...
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1answer
150 views

“Classify data in A/B/C by value x by using the function x”

This is about data classification done by computer. Data is classified into the A, B, or C rank and then the judgement result will be displayed on the screen. All the transaction is done by using ...
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6answers
19k views

Difference between “underneath” and “under” when we describe an action

I ask for the difference in a sense of active quality rather than a stative quality of the verbs. E.g. in "the toy is sitting underneath/under table", the verb is stative. So we are dealing with ...
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4answers
361 views

ending a sentence with a preposition 'of'

I know many questions have been asked for ending a sentence with a preposition in this community. However none of that seems to be providing the answer which I am looking for in this scenario. Please ...
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1answer
5k views

“Reaction to” or “reaction at”?

Here's the context: So has gone the reaction of many to the news that Facebook is buying the mobile photo-sharing service Instagram[.] Could "at" be used as well? I was taught that, when it ...
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0answers
20 views

guideline of or guideline with x [on hold]

How it is correct? "I wrote a guideline of 5 questions" or "I wrote a guideline with 5 questions" or something else? Thanks in advance!
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22 views
3
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1answer
43 views

'In' and 'among' of the title of a manuscript, which is appropriate?

I'm writing a manuscript for a medical journal, but I have trouble giving a title of it. The article looks into the effect (severe perineal injury) of episiotomy (a procedure done when delivering a ...
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2answers
97 views

“In” or “For” — or Both Acceptable?

I'm currently editing my résumé's cover letter and, while shortening a sentence, noticed a particular use of in which seemed incorrect. It never stood out to me as wrong until I started to condense ...
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1answer
30 views

Use of Confident at? [on hold]

Is it okay to use "Confident at"? For example, I have written in my CV under Skills & Abilities section: Confident at delivering presentations
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6answers
4k views

Is there such thing as an online preposition dictionary?

Is there such a thing as an online preposition dictionary? For example, I want to use the word "interpretation" but I am not sure of its preposition. I don't know if the correct preposition should ...
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5answers
10k views

Usage of 'at' and 'in' for cities

As per my understanding, 'at' can be used for streets and specific address etc. and 'in' has to be used for cities. For eg. at Suite 101, Johnshon Avenue in London. But I see in a prominent ...
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2answers
35 views

“the proposal for” or “the proposal of” [on hold]

I need to prepare the title of a document. I am not sure whether it should sound like this: "The proposal for implementation of a new architecture" or "The proposal of implementation of a new ...
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4answers
24k views

Is it “despite” or “despite of”?

Should I always use 'despite' instead of 'despite of'?
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4answers
88 views

“Within the past year” vs. “In the past year”

I'm having an argument with a co-worker about phrasing. We have a document that makes reference to someone having experience working "in the past year", and later it states "must have experience ...
2
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0answers
39 views

What is the difference between “look into” and “look at” when used in figurative meaning? [on hold]

Thank you for sending me the introduction of your company. We will "look into"/"look at" it later. What is the difference between "look into" and "look at" when used with a figurative meaning ...
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3answers
1k views

Is “on” part of a verb phrase in “Put Item on Hold?”

For an interface I'm working on, there's a command available to a user called "Put Item On Hold." Or possibly it should be "Put Item on Hold," since the style guide I'm using says that prepositions ...
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4answers
2k views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
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2answers
2k views

send you or send it to you?

Please, which phrase is correct: I have already finished the new recording; I will send you right now. I will send it to you right now.
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1answer
39 views

Is it okay to say, “I would rather eat it than look at it”?

I know "than" can be both preposition and conjunction and in this case it seems to serve as a conjunction. But the sentence doesn't look right and I think the right sentence would be, I would ...
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2answers
3k views

What is the preposition associated with “admiration”?

Is it "admiration for" or "admiration of"? For instance, does the sentence "He had a great admiration of Washington Irving." make sense?
2
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1answer
47 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
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2answers
235 views

demanded by or demanded for

I doubt about the correct preposition here. Which sentence should I use if it is the engineers themselves who are clamouring for the equipment? This instrument is highly demanded for engineers ...
3
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1answer
39 views

Trouble with prepositions [closed]

I want to write the sentence "start date of the period being aggregated over" However, I know one is not supposed to end a sentence in a preposition. I can't think of a good alternative to this ...
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1answer
38 views

Relaxed approach in/at/towards solving

What is the difference between the following and are they correct? He took a relaxed approach in solving the problem. He took a relaxed approach at solving the problem. He took a relaxed approach ...
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1answer
54 views

“Feel bad about someone” versus “feel bad for someone”

Does the sentence "I feel bad about you" have the same meaning as "I feel bad for you"?
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4answers
217 views

“[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”

Which of the following constructs sound more idiomatic to you? Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? Is there any British/American equivalent for the ...
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1answer
28 views

Question regarding the usage of comma and preposition [on hold]

Please someone help me to check these two sentences: A motivated hydrogeologist and keen on sustaining the environment and water resources, and on assessing the potential impacts of climate change ...
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2answers
63 views

Verb “escape”: with or without preposition? [closed]

I have already seen the verb "escape" with preposition ("from") and without. Is one of the uses the correct?
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2answers
86 views

Is the “of” in “a lot of” a preposition?

Is "of" in "a lot of time" a preposition? I am working on a task about the identification of prepositions and their objects. I am not sure about "a lot of", and for some reason it seems unbreakable.
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2answers
4k views

Determining if “than” is used as conjunction or preposition

"than" can be used as a conjunction and as a preposition. I want to be able to tell for any given sentence containing "than" which grammatical function it has in that sentence. My current ...
2
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2answers
2k views

Is “offer something someone” without “to” in between correct?

I interpret the latter part of the following sentence to mean "and are quite unprepared to offer the priority seats to those whom the seats are meant for." If this is correct, "to" seems to be missing ...
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1answer
36 views

Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs as seen in "come inside" and "run around". My question concerns an ...
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1answer
52 views

I bought these shoes in California vs. I bought these shoes at California

I bought it at California vs. I bought it in California I'm in a car vs. I'm on a car I'm at a store vs. I'm in a store I'm at New York City vs. I'm in New York City It's floating to the sky vs. ...
0
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1answer
50 views

'Go to sleep' vs 'Go and sleep'?

I just had a linguistics test (it's called UKLO) that measures you're ability to problem solve and translate languages you know nothing about. For one of my translation answers I wrote 'Don't go and ...
2
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1answer
113 views

What's the etymology of 'of' after verbs?

(TL;DR) While reading about preposition of on OED (eg avail of, enquire of), I encountered a possible explanation: quoted below, OED claims that the postverbal of originates from the genitive case, ...
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1answer
92 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
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1answer
68 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
2
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1answer
2k views

prepositions - “increase of” vs “increase in”

Which one is correct or if both are correct, is there any difference? The change is a 10 percent increase of tuition The change is a 10 percent increase in tuition
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101 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.