Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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“…the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK” [duplicate]

After the second world war, the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK. Options by with between among My Approach: I am not able to solve this ...
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4answers
96 views

The use of preposition in this case

Do I always need a preposition when I say.. "I traveled (in) NY?" Can I simply say, "I traveled NY"?
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2answers
63 views

Which is correct, in each number, or on each number or for each number?

Which is correct, in each number, or on each number or for each number? I need to ask questions mentioning that each number has a different instruction. Any help that includes sentence examples will ...
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1answer
275 views

Preposition: Within vs In

Is there a distinction between "within" and "in" as in, "upon finding a violation within the preceding four years" versus "upon finding a violation in the preceding four years"?
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0answers
50 views

Can I treat “after” in this sentence as a conjunction instead of a preposition?

I met up a choice question recently: The boy dived into the water and after ___ seemed to be a long time, he came up again. A.what B.that C.it D.which The answer says A is correct. According ...
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1answer
50 views

“definition” or “defining” (of the)? [closed]

Which one is best: Defining of the settings is enabled when... Defining settings is enabled when... Definition of the settings is enabled when... (some other form) ?
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1answer
92 views

Correct preposition for 'workplace'

Should I say Eating is not allowed in the workplace or Eating is not allowed at the workplace when eating is, in fact, not allowed anywhere near the PC in an office?
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2answers
91 views

the use of “by” and “to” [closed]

I can't distinguish between the use of by and to when putting them in such sentence: House prices had risen by/to 0.3 % in July". Especially the meaning of by.
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106 views

Which is best, “to access” or “of access”?

When describing someone who is reclusive is it better to say: He was difficult to access. or He was difficult of access.
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1answer
69 views

Between 'decide' and 'an object', are prepositions like 'on, upon, about' extraneous?

Caution: This question concerns the verb 'direct' followed immediately afterwards by an object. To ameliorate readability, I eschew the use of blockquotes below, where I quoted the OED. [Source:] ...
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0answers
567 views

“Enquire from someone” vs “enquire with someone”

Which is the correct sentence from these two? Can you enquire from her? Can you enquire with her? I tried to search the internet but most results talk about the difference between ...
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1answer
123 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
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3answers
706 views

Preposition in vs. of

Which is correct; "in" poverty or "of" poverty? The children have survived 10 years of poverty. or The children have survived 10 years in poverty. Thank you!
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1answer
50 views

Use of “and” in “This line connects point A to Point B”

Dictionaries say when two things are connected or linked, the prepositions to use are “to” and “with” (e.g. “This line connects point A to Point B” and “The train links Paris with London”). Would you ...
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2answers
5k views

'With' vs 'by' - where to use these two preposition in an English sentence?

I am confused with use of word with or by in a sentence. For example, if I say: The letter was written with ball pen. this is correct. And if in another sentence I say: The letter ...
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2answers
64 views

About the word 'aurora': which time preposition to use?

Aurora, in poetic language, means dawn, according to some dictionaries. How commonly is it used to indicate time? I've mostly encountered by dawn and in the morning and was wondering if that's the ...
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1answer
58 views

Why is the preposition apparently optional in this sentence?

I encountered the following sentence: "...contains the majority of information required to build a project in just the way you want." It occurred to me that the sentence sounds completely ...
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2answers
92 views

Can I use “of” to mean “caused by”?

For instance, can I say: I'm not sure if it was a deception of the moon, but the field looked brown. In this case, "deception of the moon" means "illusion caused by the moon". Is it common to ...
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2answers
105 views

Why do they use “in” like random in the sentences?

How can I understand the usage of in which comes after have in the sentence below? From Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes in A Study in Scarlett, Chapter 3: There still remained some ...
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0answers
51 views

Usage of “from” in the given sentence

I was reading about the Los Caprichos collection by Goya and specifically one sentence drew my attention: "the innumerable foibles and follies to be found in any civilized society, and from the ...
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1answer
62 views

Is “Deals you'll want to tell everyone” correct?

We have a VW billboard in here Melbourne advertising Deals you'll want to tell everyone It's a fairly big-budget campaign so I assume the grammar has been thought out, but it just sounds off to ...
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1answer
119 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
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1answer
300 views

How to use “in respective of” and how does it compare to “in terms of”? [closed]

How to use the expression "in respective of" and how does it compare to "in terms of"? What is their appropriate usage?
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2answers
4k views

At, by, in the end of this week

I have the following three sentences: I am reading it by the end of this week. I am reading it at the end of this week. I am reading it in the end of this week. Which one is more grammatically ...
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0answers
78 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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1answer
204 views

Prepositions usage: 'in' vs 'for' a flexible beam

There is a topic for a scientific paper in which I think the usage of the preposition "in" is incorrect. The topic is titled as follows: Admissible Observation Operators in a Flexible Beam ...
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3answers
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to have fun “on a journey” vs “in a journey”

Richard Branson in an interview with Motivated magazine was quoted as saying: To have fun in [my] journey through life and learn from [my] mistakes. Source: PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENTS OF 5 ...
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1answer
185 views

Why at the school not at school

In the following sentence why is it at the school not at school? They don't have to do their homework today because it's a holiday at the school.
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1answer
116 views

Preposition for “same” [closed]

I've seen some sentences online that use the expression, "the same of" in place of "the same as". Do these two expressions mean the same as each other? If not, can someone please explain how to use ...
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7answers
893 views

“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...
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2answers
329 views

Preposition for “Encounter”

The usual preposition after the word, "Encounter" is "with". Such as, "My encounter with an old friend". But I saw "of" being used as a preposition in an example sentence in the Merriam-Webster ...
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2answers
265 views

What are the title capitalization rules for rarely used prepositions like “down”, “up”, “off”, etc.?

In capitalizing English titles, my understanding is that all prepositions of four or fewer letters should be written lowercase, unless part of a phrasal verb. (I realize that AP style and the Chicago ...
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1answer
137 views

In both years |OR| From both years? [closed]

Years: 2003 and 2033 (In both years/From both years) North and South America had the highest number of people living in urban areas. /// Please provide an explanation of your answer.
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2answers
896 views

‘Went for a run’ vs. ‘went on a run’

I would like to know what's the difference between: I went for a run today I went on a run today. And when it's correct to apply each of those. Thanks a ton. Pablo.
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2answers
51 views

Unto: an unusual usage

In the King James version, Luke 23:15 says No, nor yet Herod: for I sent you to him; and, lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him. It is clear from the context that Pilate is here telling ...
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2answers
260 views

Can I use the same preposition twice after the verb?

Can I use the same preposition twice after the verb? For instance: the expectations provided for for the grade
2
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2answers
204 views

preposition confusion in or on [duplicate]

I heard a person say " there is no room on the bus ". It for some reason sounded incorrect. However the most basic argument that we hear is that if it is a public transport, we use "on" but buses also ...
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1answer
6k views

Usage of “reply”: Please reply to me or reply me (used in formal tone) [closed]

Which usage is correct? Please reply to me as soon as possible. Please reply me as soon as possible. In my understanding, people say, "Please reply my mail..." What about the ones I wrote above? I ...
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1answer
38 views

“He weeps at school.” and “He weeps in school.” are both alright and the same meaning? [closed]

I wonder whether both sentence A and sentence B are correct and the same thing or not. Sentence A => "He weeps at school." Sentence B => "He weeps in school." Thanks.
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1answer
1k views

“In accordance to the rule” and “in accordance with the rule”

Is it correct to use preposition "to" in "in accordance to the rules" or it has to be "with" as in "in accordance with the rule"? I have found usage of "with" more frequent but have seen few instances ...
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1answer
45 views

Should I write “encode X into format Y” or “encode X in format Y”?

In technical writing involving such things as file formats, should one write "encode such-and-such into format Y" or write "encode such-and-such in format Y"? In other words, which preposition (into ...
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2answers
97 views

in a system vs. on a system

If I want to describe something within the realm/environment/domain of something), do I say in or on? Example: Free software is common in GNU/Linux. Comment: I would like to express that free ...
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1answer
35 views

standardized in vs. standardized by

When do you say something was standardized by and when do you say something was standardized in? It is my understanding that in is used to refer to a document describing the standard, while by is ...
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4answers
196 views

What preposition do you use with 'dilemma'?

I want to say that at some point in my life, I had to choose between two majors for undergraduate studies. Is this sentence grammatically correct? I was in the dilemma of choosing between y ...
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3answers
632 views

Can I use “because” and “if” consecutively in a sentence?

This is the sentence in question: I would like to be able to make an unlimited number of wishes because if I wish for money, life, and love, I don't have to work and I don't have to be afraid of ...
2
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1answer
56 views

Deterioration in vs deterioration of

Is it better to say, 'the injury caused a deterioration in his physical function', or 'the injury caused a deterioration of his physical functioning'?
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1answer
44 views

“go at it with everything you've got” vs “go for it with everything you've got”

From the dictionary, I understand that go at means “undertake” and “tackle”, while go for means “go after with maximum efforts”. I feel that the latter above is redundant, because go for already ...
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1answer
64 views

take a picture of sb. vs take a picture for sb [closed]

take a picture of sb. vs take a picture for sb. I feel "of" means that sb. is the subject of the picture you're taking. while "for" means something else could be the subject of the picture. Am I ...
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1answer
82 views

“with” in Is that alright with everybody?

Is that alright with everybody? What does the word "with" mean here? Can I use "for" or "to" here? Thanks.
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2answers
628 views

Can 'once' be a preposition?

I'm motivated to ask this question because of this other question on ELL SE. It seems to me that that's a prepositional phrase, but I don't see 'once' in any lists of prepositions, and the only ...