Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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How should I fill these blanks on an agreement?

How should I fill these blanks on an agreement? The agreement starts like this; __ legally represented by _, residing at __ on __ hereinafter referred as "Contractor"... 1)Name 2)as the person not ...
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3answers
467 views

“Responsible for” vs. “responsible in”

Which sentence is incorrect and which one is correct? Why? She is responsible for answering the phone. She is responsible in answering the phone.
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1answer
327 views

Sentence patterns: There are 16 ways to “leave” your book

Playing around in my head the different positions that a subject; verb; direct object; and indirect object can be positioned in one sentence, I ended up with 16 sentences using only the simple past ...
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4answers
538 views

Using “apologize” without “for”

Is it grammatically correct to use "apologize" as a verb without the preposition "for"? apologize: to make a formal defense in speech or writing. "I apologize the event." Wouldn't this ...
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1answer
305 views

oriented on (a subject)

Can someone be oriented 'on' something? For instance, oriented on content instead of process or oriented on the long term instead of short term Or should it always be used with 'towards' ...
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45 views

Usage of 'for' and 'have'

Here is the situation. My birthday is coming. I feel fairly happy. I am going to have a party for my birthday. Does 'for' here mean 'because of' ? I am going to have a party for my friends. Does ...
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65 views

What is correct: “we prove statement X by / by using / with / through / …”

First, I'm sorry for any duplicates (although I could not find a similar question). My question is: how do I correctly fill in the ??? in the following sentence? We prove Statement X ??? the ...
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1answer
200 views

What is the appropriate verb and preposition to say “play the lottery”?

Do we play the lottery? Do we play in/on the lottery? Do we bet the lottery? What is the appropriate verb for the sentence and is it necessary to use a preposition?
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1answer
404 views

good AT vs. good IN [duplicate]

Can I say "I am good AT math" or "I am good IN math".Are there rules for these or I can use eithe. And do they differ in meaning if I use AT or IN?
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183 views

the function of the preposition “of” in a phrase “, those of the dynamic nature of,”

I'd very appreciate if somebody can help me understand the exact function of the preposition in the phrase between the two commas! Everywhere we find the same leading motifs; the concepts of ...
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1answer
397 views

Use of preposition after 'Follow-up' [closed]

Could someone suggest what preposition to use after 'Follow-up'? Is it 'on' or 'of' or 'to'?
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2answers
4k views

“Because of” vs. “due to” — best choice to explain a reason? [duplicate]

Given the sentence, This exception was thrown __ invalid input. Which preposition should I use to fill in the blank — because of or due to? Is either generally preferable for specifying cause ...
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4answers
305 views

Using the prepositions “on”/“off” as transitive verbs

Is it correct to say 'on it' or 'off it', where 'it' may refer to something like a light switch?
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4answers
97 views

Let Ω be a domain in/of Rⁿ

What is the correct preposition in the sentence: Let Ω be a domain in/of Rⁿ. Is there a different meaning for "in" and "of"? Both seem to be commonly used, Google gives about 200.000 hits for both, ...
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2answers
147 views

“occur to” vs. “happen to” what is the difference [closed]

What would be the right choice in this context? Until it occurred to me or happened to me?
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1answer
98 views

“Come of a royal family” vs. “comes from a royal family”

Is it correct to say "She comes of a royal family"? Or should it be "She comes from a royal family"? Both sound correct to me. Could someone explain?
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1answer
322 views

“Distribute to” vs. “distribute among” [closed]

Sumit distributed the sweets __ his friends. In the above sentence, I couldn't tell whether to use to or among. The answer given is among. Why not to?
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2answers
51 views

The counterpart of “inside”

If X is inside something, what is that something's relationship to X? The dog is inside the house. → The house is _ _ _ _ the dog. I was thinking of around, but it really sounds ugly, and it ...
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1answer
85 views

'Per' vs 'by' - as in 'interactions by/per post'

I'm attempting to get a title for a list of interactions made on posts by users. "Interactions by/per post". Are by and per interchangeable? Is one more formal than the other? I feel that by might ...
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1answer
101 views

A correct preposition - account closed due/by/at 12th of May

I asked my bank to close my account on 12th of May. Also I expect the account to be closed [?] 12th of May . What preposition should be there? I think about by or due. Also if I want to ask ...
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3answers
100 views

“The song is on Reservoir Dogs” vs. “is off Reservoir Dogs” vs. “features within Reservoir Dogs”

During a discussion today, the song Stuck in the Middle came on. One of the members of my team asked, "is this on Reservoir Dogs?" Another said, "this is off Reservoir Dogs". To which the team manager ...
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1answer
51 views

Usage of 'to' with ' All that '

Which one of the following statements is grammatically correct? All that act would do is speed up the process of bringing justice to the victims All that act would do is to speed up the process of ...
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1answer
280 views

What is the right preposition after “report”?

"He will report into Charles." or "He will report to Charles." ? "He will report into the Collectorate." or "He will report to the Collectorate." ?
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“Die from cancer” vs “Die of cancer”

Is there a difference between those expressions: "Die from cancer" or "Die of cancer"? Are they both correct?
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74 views

“Tune to <something>” - does it make sense?

I am wondering if saying "tune to this music" would make sense? Guitars can be tuned to particular note, can people tune to song, or music, or idea? Google doesn't return many results for "tune to" ...
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1answer
99 views

Does one hold a M.A. 'in' something or 'of' something? [duplicate]

In reading a curriculum vitae, I noticed an author used both 2013 M.A. of Information Science and 2008 M.A. in Philosophy. Is there any logic to this? Which one should be preferred for ...
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4answers
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Usage of 'at' and 'in' for cities

As per my understanding, 'at' can be used for streets and specific address etc. and 'in' has to be used for cities. For eg. at Suite 101, Johnshon Avenue in London. But I see in a prominent ...
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2answers
433 views

Is it “moved into” or “moved in to”?

I suppose I am confused in general about the use of "into" versus "in to." For this case, though, consider the sentence, "I moved into my apartment today" as opposed to "I moved in to my apartment ...
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501 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
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2answers
397 views

Which preposition to use with “diagnose” [closed]

I had an English exam today. One of the questions was fill in the gaps. It was like: Doctors diagnosed him with/ for hyperactivity. So should the gap be with or for? I checked Google and there ...
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1answer
609 views

“At” vs. “in” followed by a city name

Is it correct to use "at" followed by a place name (city, town, village, etc.)? I've been seeing phrases like "a hotel at Las Vegas" or "she was living at London" quite a lot recently. Is this a ...
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3answers
2k views

Preposition after “Good luck”.

I have seen different preposition after "Good luck". Example: Good luck on/with/for your new job Could you explain the possible differences of usage or meaning. Thank you.
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143 views

“With what […]?” or “What […] with?”

Making a comparison with Who/Whom I now have a doubt about the use of what with prepositions in questions. I'll explain by example: These two sentences are correct, one is more formal than the other: ...
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1answer
5k views

Difference between conjunctions and prepositions

Conjunctions are usually defined as words that join words, clauses or sentences together. Prepositions are defined as expressing relations between parts of a sentence. However, by expressing ...
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1answer
481 views

I have a problem in “Look + preposition” Rule [closed]

I have a problem in deciding preposition Sentence A : She's looking at me, I want to change "me" with "here" , the sentence became : "She's looking at here" Please correct the sentence ...
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1answer
2k views

“Through the course” vs. “over the course”

I have heard the following used often Over the course of the semester, ... but a friend recently told me Through the course of the semester, ... Are both of these usages of the idiom ...
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153 views

“Scheduled to September” vs. “scheduled in September”

She is qualified to attend the test being scheduled [to/in] September. Which is right?
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“Absorbed in” vs. “absorbed with”

That young man was absorbed in his big camera. He was shooting a short movie of people and passers by who were singing and reading the poems under the trees. If I use with instead of in, does it ...
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1answer
77 views

What would you call this kind of prepositional phrase?

What would you call a sentence that goes something like The foreman sent a worker to find me with a hammer. The sentence is ambiguous, and could mean either: The foreman sent a worker to find ...
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196 views

“I grip the steering wheel like I grasp TO my memory of that day.” Is that “to” wrong? Omit, or change to “at”?

In the sentence above, is "grasp to my memory of..." wrong? It feels wrong, but I can't articulate why. I might say "grasp at my memory of" or perhaps omit the preposition all together. I fear ...
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292 views

Preposition placement mid-sentence

I was recently reviewing a piece of writing for a friend of mine who wrote Though such a theory does not describe the world we live in, it will undoubtedly shed light on... I told him to ...
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Can I use “among” instead of “in” in this sentence?

Can I use "among" instead of "in" in this sentence? Test results showed that it could slow memory loss by as much as 17% in patients if taken regularly and in combination with other prescribed ...
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0answers
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“I found the cause [of/for] the misbehaviour” [duplicate]

I struggle to prefer one over the other. I first wrote: OK, I found the cause of the misbehaviour. But while rereading I thought to myself that I would actually say, OK, I found the cause ...
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2answers
98 views

After this “as”, are there any words omitted?

“He is still out there somewhere, perhaps looking for another body to share… not being truly alive, he cannot be killed. He left Quirrell to die; he shows just as little mercy to his followers ...
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64 views

“At Amararaja Batteries Limited” vs. “in Amararaja Batteries Limited” [duplicate]

I have done my internship at Amararaja Batteries Limited. I have done my internship in Amararaja Batteries Limited. Which of the above sentences is correct? I want to know when to use at ...
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1answer
77 views

“Developed by” vs “Developed at”

Normally I see things written this way : Developed by Joe Doe But I have also seen instances where it says: Developed by Company Inc. Now, I know it doesn't make sense to say: ...
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1answer
585 views

Use of verb to give is used alone or with preposition “to”? [duplicate]

Why is it that when I say "I will give this book to my daughter", I am using the verb "give" and the preposition "to", but "to" is not used in the following: "What kind of names do people in your ...
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1answer
251 views

How to use “to offer” with two objects?

I am new in this web site! I would like to know if the following sentence is correct : Operating systems offer processes running in user mode a set of interfaces that can be used to make ...
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new features in vs. new features of

Which of the following sentences is correct? The new features of the software are given below: OR The new features in the software are given below:
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51 views

'The leader of' vs 'the leader in' [closed]

"Red Kennels, The Leader of Dog Training Kennels" "Red Kennels, The Leader in Dog Training Kennels". Which preposition should I use—of or in?