Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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The grammatical parts of speech in 'As ____ as when ___'

What parts of speech are the each of the individual words in as penniless as when. For example when used in the following sentence: They were as penniless as when the little man found them.
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“separated by”, “separated with”, or does it not matter?

I'm describing how you write something down (specifically, an array initializer in JavaScript, but that's not important), and find myself intrigued by the choice of using "separated by" vs. "separated ...
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2answers
109 views

Can a person be “responsible” to another person?

I came across this statement in a policy/guideline text: "He/she is responsible to the MD for maintaining the accuracy of this Guidelines. The Guidelines shall be adopted annually by the MD even if no ...
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2answers
679 views

What is a Prepositional complement?

Could someone tell me what Prepositional complement is? The text that brought this issue up says: ... a possessive is used as Prepositional complement. They give an example: what business is ...
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1k views

Valid from and valid to or until?

Would valid to make sense when refering to an expiration date? I've got this text right now: Valid from: 01/10/2014 Valid to: 10/10/2014 It doesn't sound correct. Should it be until? In which ...
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17 views

Is “happened Tuesday” (without “on”) a valid pattern? [duplicate]

The album was released Tuesday and has been well-received by […] Shouldn't it be "released on Tuesday"? Where did the "on" go? I think dropping the preposition is confusing, but I see it ...
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307 views

Using the word 'come' to mean 'when it comes'

I am currently playing the game Max Payne 3 and I came across an interesting formulation: I hope Fabiana will not be served to the fishes come feeding time. Is this normal in American English?
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72 views

Are prepositions 'on' or 'to' in the description of relative position necessary?

I'd like to find the shortest way to describe relative position of object A that is on the left of object B. Are prepositions like 'on' or 'to' necessary? Is it correct to say I found two chairs ...
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64 views

“To How” or “In How”?

I have the sentence: "Since that experience, I have made changes to how I address all of my courses." Should I use "to how" or "in how" for any grammatical reason(s), or is it simply a matter of ...
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90 views

“Indispensible for” vs, “indispensible to”

What is the difference between "indispensible to" and "indispensible for"? Likewise, between "it is important to me" and "it is important for me", which one is correct?
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97 views

“Two parts to it” versus “two parts of it”

What's the difference between “there are two parts of it” and “there are two parts to it”? My student asked me this question and I'm not quite sure what the correct answer is. Any advice would be ...
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“Outside of X” vs “outside X” [duplicate]

I've noticed more and more that when referring to a country or place the use of 'of' is increasing. For example: Outside of France, it's unusual to meet a Johnny Halliday fan. Why use of here? ...
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How the verb becomes a gerund after “to”, e.g. “committed to helping you” [duplicate]

When we say I am looking forward to seeing you. instead of I am looking forward to see you. is the word "to" a preposition, attached to the verb as one word?
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225 views

ON or AT the surface of the shell? [closed]

On the wall, at the table but how to say ON or AT the surface of the shell?
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106 views

“Tax on” vs. “tax over”

Does one pay tax on income or pay tax over income? I come across both regularly. On seems to be preferred usage, but I'd like to know which is most correct or formal and why.
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83 views

Can a kangaroo jump higher than/above the building?

A building cannot jump. We generally use "higher" to campare with something that can jump. But, can we use "higher" in this context? It comes from the following joke - Q. Can a kangaroo jump higher ...
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7k views

“Knowledgeable about” vs. “knowledgeable on” vs. “knowledgeable in”

When should I use each of the collocations "knowledgeable about", "knowledgeable on", and "knowledgeable in"?
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190 views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
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140 views

Preposition and tense-Homework

In today's exam, I had few grammar questions. I am doubtful in two questions. Please check my answers and correct the mistakes, if any. 1.Fill with suitable prepositions. There lived _ _ _ _ _ a ...
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571 views

'of' or 'by' or 'from'

I have a sentence that contains the phrase We support products of different manufacturers [...] Is the use of 'of' correct there? A coworker said I should use 'by' and I also can think of 'from' as ...
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2k views

The use of “for” with the verb “to crave”

My gut feeling tells me one says "I crave chocolate" and not "I crave for chocolate". This was confirmed for example at this forum discussion. However, google also showed me the sentence "I crave for ...
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150 views

Why “on the books”, not “in the books”

On the books means "part of the law". These changes would add little to the civil rights laws now on the books. I know the meaning of this idiom, and idioms are used as they are, but idioms ...
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When you have a sentence containing a list separated by commas, do you need to repeat the verb before a preposition?

I.E. Which of these is correct? A. You are cool, funny, and among the most popular of students at this school. B. You are cool, funny, and are among the most popular of students at this school. ...
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In June–July 1967? Between June–July 1967?

Which is correct and which is not? In June--July 1967, there were... Between June--July 1967, there were... Between June and July 1967, there were... If I want to use "June--July 1967", how can I ...
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4answers
540 views

“My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow” (grammar of 'to dinner')

My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow. The meaning is clear. However, if you think about it, what this seems to literally say is that the aunt is going directly to some dinner (and not even an ...
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What does this usage of “with” mean? [closed]

I'm sorry for asking what will be such a simple question but I'm not sure exactly how With is used in sentences where that's the first word. Is that what it took to fall in love with someone? ...
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495 views

When do you leave out the preposition in a relative clause?

A non-fiction titled "Do the Right Thing" published in 1998 has this sentence: (1) Am I treating this stranger with the same consideration that I would a friend? Another book (fiction) titled ...
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429 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Contra”?

According to multiple sources (1 and 2), the word "contra" can be employed as either a preposition or an adverb. From my perspective, however, there is a dearth of clear examples featuring this word ...
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75 views

“Habitat selection in/of birds”, “concept in/of statistics”, “theme in/of evolution”

It seems to me that in and of work equally well in sentences such as these: Habitat selection in birds is frequently studied. Habitat selection of birds is frequently studied. ...
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44 views

Document “from” or “of” year 1988

If I refer to a document that was written in 1988, which is correct? The document of 1988 mentions the birth of a legend. or The document from 1988 mentions the birth of a legend.
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Prepositions: “The confusing widgets of language”

The title is adapted from an article in THE WEEK, written by James Harbeck. Well worth reading if you ask me. I don't particularly like prepositions. They are small, seemingly insignificant things ...
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237 views

Are any of these terms correct? “Known with” or “known by”

Suppose a famous building, i.e. a stadium, a concert hall, etc., known as a landmark in a place, being sponsored by a company, such that people may happen to use the company name instead of the ...
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Is this usage of 'of which' correct?

I'm working on an employee manual and I came across this one: "Our team philosophy is to become the best of which we are capable." Is this a correct sentence? The point it's trying to get across is ...
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Are prepositions a part of grammar or vocabulary?

If I you fill in the blanks with prepositions, is it a grammar exercise or a vocabulary exercise, e.g. He was here ______ the morning.
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891 views

What is the right preposition after “skeptical”?

Which preposition is suitable to follow skeptical?
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What preposition is the proper one to follow the noun “hatred”?

What is the proper preposition to follow the noun hatred? Do we have a hatred for Buddhism? Do we have a hatred of Buddhism? Do we have a hatred against Buddhism? These are all just examples. ...
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115 views

What is the appropriate preposition for “mailing list”?

I am trying to write a motivation letter and in this sentence I am not sure which preposition is appropriate for "mailing list". Would you please help me? To clarify the case, I am subscribed to a ...
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2k views

Can “unto” be used instead of “onto” in American English?

Is there a difference in how the preposition "onto" is used in British and American English? I always understood it to match the following dictionary definition I found online, and was not aware of ...
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96 views

Floating in/on atmosphere?

Which of the following two are correct? Melodies floating in relaxing atmosphere. Melodies floating on relaxing atmosphere. My gut feeling says that it should be 1, but I am just a bit confused. ...
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Meaning of “by” when used with dates - inclusive or exclusive [duplicate]

If, in a contract fr example, the text reads: "X has to finish the work by MM-DD-YYYY", does the "by" include the date or exclude it? In other words, will the work delivered on the specified date ...
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Can the word “proxy” be used as a preposition?

At the end of a sentence, I want to insert the following (parentheses included): (proxy my parents, of course). E.g., I sent my brother to his room (proxy my parents, of course). But this ...
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4k views

“I'm sorry for” vs. “I'm sorry about”

Can I use about and for interchangeably? If not, when should I use either? Which is more common? I'm sorry for/about yesterday. I'm sorry for/about my bad English. I'm sorry for/about that. ...
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68 views

“in” versus “of”

I hope that both forms shown below are correct. What is the difference between them and which one seems more natural? the initial and final element in the expression/clause the initial and ...
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399 views

Should I use 'by' preposition of time in past/future perfect tenses only?

In which tenses can I use 'by' as a preposition of time? My teacher told me you are allowed to use this preposition in past perfect or future perfect tenses only, but I ran into a lot of sentences on ...
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Omission of 'for' with various quantified time intervals: influence of verb

I came across these two examples, given to illustrate 'a case' where the inclusion of the preposition for is considered optional in the paper "Acquisition of Preposition Deletion by Non-native ...
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271 views

“New York is a great place to live.” (no preposition?)

New York is a great place to live. New York is a great place to live in. I've seen the former usage a lot and I've started wondering what the grammar aspects of it are. The main question ...
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What can be “in” a mountain?

I come from a language that heavily uses in as a preposition, so I often overuse it in English. I am trying to differentiate between things that can be in a mountain vs. things that can only be on a ...
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108 views

“In” + gerund: “Pip joins the procession in carrying the casket”

Pip joins the funeral procession, planned out by Mr. Trabb, the tailor, in carrying Mrs. Joe’s casket through town. Is this sentence grammatically correct? One of my teachers proofread my work, ...
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Using “of” twice in a sentence

Is it correct to use of twice in the following sentence? The problem of absence of remote facilities is addressed in the article... What is the best way of writing this sentence?
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Use of 'not' in questions

When is it okay to use 'not' when posing a question? I believe that the person asking would include the 'not 'when he believes the implied to be true. For example: "Are you going to the store? "Are ...