Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
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Stranding of preposition in questions

I know that in sentences such as the following one, "from" is to be put at the end of the question: Where are you from? Does this rule apply also to the next one: Which movie is this scene ...
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239 views

“To live in” vs. “To live”

It is a question that follows up on the one posted today: "My hometown is a good place to live in." "My hometown is a good place to live." "Live" is usually used as an intransitive verb ...
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105 views

Should I use “awe of” or “awe at”?

The full sentence is: I express unqualified awe at Nathaniel.
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138 views

Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
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283 views

Preposition after conclude

If the police conclude that the person died by accident, should I say 'The police concluded in an accident' ? To me, this sounds like they finish the story by having an accident.
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Do I lose the subject of the sentence by adding a preposition?

The following second sentence, continues the first, but I wonder whether using the word in causes the second sentence to no longer have a subject, or does it remain from the prior sentence by way of ...
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247 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
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50 views

Is the preposition “of” ever OK after numbers and units of measurement? [closed]

Would it be correct to say "5 billion cubic meters OF natural gas". Is the preposition "of" ever OK after numbers and units of measurement?
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53 views

What is the difference between “in this year” and “this year”?

Travis , Tammy, and Shane, from Composition 115, spring semester, were sitting together on a leather bench in the sleekly lit lobby of my apartment building. The three of them had attended the same ...
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37 views

What are the differences between “come on down” and “come down”?

"I answered the phone in my apartment and heard the sloping drawl of one of my students , Travis." Miss Diana, " he said, "Could you come on down the stairs a minute?" It was early May on the ...
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56 views

Connecting “with” or “to”

I read the answers to similar questions, but I need to be sure. I chose the sentence: "Connecting solutions with people" on my business card and want to be sure it's not suppose to be "Connecting ...
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78 views

“Being used in a disease” vs “being used on a disease”

The treatment didn’t work, because it was being used in/on a disease that wasn’t a disease. A native English speaker told me on was the correct choice. But Google Books returns 0 results for ...
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“Of” used to used for saying which specific thing belonging to a more general type you are referring to

"Of" can be used to describe the relationship between two close things, one thing being kind of an explanatory element. And gerund is frequently used. For example: The idea of getting into the ...
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62 views

Is saying “He was well thought of” ending a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

If not, is there any other way to say this? (I'm looking for synonyms, not rewordings such as "Others thought well of him.")
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45 views

Being cheap with/ about?

I don't want to spend too much money on phones. May I say I am cheap with phones or I am cheap about phones I have come across a sentence that says I am cheap for certain things ...
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36 views

Proper use of a comma before a preposition

Experts, after some research, I am still unable to determine if the following is proper: I wanted to see if you could, as they say in the industry, give me a "sanity check" on what I have done. ...
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68 views

what is the preposition equivalent to “divided by” [duplicate]

"times" is the preposition equivalent to "multiplied by". what is the preposition equivalent to "divided by"?
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74 views

Gerund with and without “of” preposition

Could you please explain the difference between using of a gerund with and without "of" preposition? For example what is the difference between following sentences: I've worked on improving of ...
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225 views

“look forward to” vs. “do not look forward to”

Why the sentences "We look forward to < noun> ..." and "We do not look forward to < verb>..." are both correct ? A < noun> has to be used in the first and a < verb> has to be used in the ...
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112 views

Is it possible to use “demotivate” with something not related to studying or job?

The question is in the title. Actually, I need something of a synonym to "disencourage" and "demotivate" was the first word that came to my mind. Also, if it's possible to use "demotivate" with ...
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183 views

Grammatical usage of prepositions: before or after “not only …but also…”

Which one is more universal, before or after "not only...but also..."? I saw a sentence in an article: ...masters were responsible not only for teaching their apprentices a trade but also ...
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1answer
32 views

Dealing with “dealing with”. [closed]

I am writing an academic paper, and I don't know which of the two forms are more suitable and/or correct. "The question should be dealt with using different tools and methods." or "The question ...
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2answers
344 views

Opened many doors - “for me” or “to me”? [closed]

I'm trying to say that some event in my life has made many achievements in the future possible for me. Do I say it has opened many doors for me or it has opened many doors to me ? Thanks ...
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“mail we have sent you” or “mail we have sent to you”- which one is correct? [duplicate]

"the code that you sent us" or "the code that you sent to us": which one is correct? "mail we have sent you" or "mail we have sent to you"- which one is correct?
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56 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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is stranding prepositions incorrect? [duplicate]

I recently came across this issue. I searched online and found that a stranded preposition might be no longer treated as incorrect, but it's just a guess. Are you still taught not to end a sentence ...
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41 views

capacities to do or capacities in doing?

What is the best choice that can be used after "capacities": Do people have capacities to do (I think this is right), or capacities in doing (as a good friend of mine insists)? For example, ...
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Which preposition for “Are you new to/at/in school?”

I want to ask this question, but I'm not sure which preposition to use: Are you new to/at/in school? If a student asks this question to a new teacher, which preposition sound better?
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170 views

Is “away” an adverb in “He ran away”. Also, is it an Object?

Is 'away' the object of the verb 'ran' in: I ran away ... or is it an adverb modifying the verb 'ran'? It seems to be obligatory, which may indicate that it's a phrasal verb as ODO has a ...
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84 views

“Walk in” or “Walk into”? How to decide whether to use “in” or “into”? [duplicate]

"You can't just walk in/into the class without permission". What is the word to go by in this statement?
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728 views

“Challenged by” or “Challenged with”? How to decide whether to use “by” or “with”?

Freedom was challenged with/by the clashing wills of powerful states and evil designs of tyrants. Which one to use "by" or "with"?
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81 views

prepositions in or on [duplicate]

I am confused with preposition. I have experiences in the field of children and young people or I have experiences on the field of children and young people? which is correct?
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137 views

I knew him/know him/had know him already

Could anyone clear my doubt. I am very confused when to use KNOW and KNEW. Suppose if there is a conversation between two people. A is introducing his new friend C to B. A: Let me introduce my ...
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150 views

Preposition to use with the phrase “come to an understanding”

So, I'm to translate a sentence to English. It's something like: We've succeeded in coming to an understanding ______ all questions discussed. I suppose that I should use either about or in to ...
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82 views

'Vote their conscience' or 'Vote with their conscience'

Is the preposition required in this sentence? Representatives should vote their conscience on Monday. OR Representatives should vote with their conscience on Monday. Or are both okay? Is one better? ...
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1answer
959 views

'Catalyst for' vs 'catalyst to'

I came across this sentence in an exercise: 'Arkwright is considered the father of the modern industrial factory system and his inventions were a catalyst ___ the Industrial Revolution.' There are 3 ...
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81 views

Using “of” after a coordinating conjuction [duplicate]

How should I say this? The color of the chair and the table ... The color of the chair and of the table ... Why should that option be used (apart from being the correct one)?
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“Member FDIC” instead of “Member of FDIC”?

For several years now (as long as I've paid attention) almost every ad or commercial for a bank or credit union says they are Member FDIC or Member NCUA. Where is the of? Why are these not Member of ...
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65 views

“Within countries”?

In editing an academic text, I came across this sentence: "This implies that within countries, women in stable employment have a higher probability of a second child than women who are not in stable ...
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135 views

Aim for, aim at, aim to

I was asked what the differences are in usage between these three, but I think I probably confused things more than I helped. I guess mostly it's a matter of style? I wondered if anyone had a good ...
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71 views

Globalisation encourage economic cooperation among/between nations?

Globalisation encourage economic cooperation among/between nations. My approach: Before my teacher taught me i saw various rules and also found some questions here related to difference between ...
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207 views

How to indicate the number of persons that will be attending an event

I created a website for users to RSVP to a wedding. One of the questions they have to answer is to indicate how many persons will attend the wedding. What is the correct wording for a question like ...
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152 views

which is the suitable preposition for the end of “ keep/stay in touch”?

Is there any other preposition that we can use after "stay in touch"+with, instead of with? thank you
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88 views

prepositional phrases used as nouns

Looking for examples of prepositional phrases that function as nouns. This example has been given: 'After three o'clock would be more convenient for me.' 'After three o'clock' serves as the subject. ...
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167 views

OUT east vs BACK east [closed]

I have heard various terms to describe one's travels East. Some people say, "I am going out East." Others say, "I'm going back East." Still others say, "I'm going down East." Which is correct?
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80 views

Preposition phrases: “for many days in a cocoon” / “in a cocoon for many days”

Are both sentences correct, or is one of them wrong grammatically ? 1) After eating, they rest for many days in a cocoon. 2) After eating, they rest in a cocoon for many days. I can't figure out ...
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342 views

Obtain a visa “in”, “from” or “at” the embassy? [closed]

What is the correct preposition in this statement? I obtained my visa at/in/from the Embassy of the Republic of ... I have a visa now, I visited an embassy, made all the procedures and ...
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29 views

Say below in case the objects are touching each other

I am implemening an Andoird app where the activity has map view and below it, I have small area to display some information about the markers in the map. The map and this area are touching. ...
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159 views

“Up until 8th” - including 8th or not? [duplicate]

I've got this message from my friend: "I'll be pretty busy basically up until the 8th November." In this case, which is correct, he will be pretty busy including 8th or he will not be pretty busy from ...