Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

-2
votes
1answer
85 views

In both years |OR| From both years? [closed]

Years: 2003 and 2033 (In both years/From both years) North and South America had the highest number of people living in urban areas. /// Please provide an explanation of your answer.
0
votes
2answers
473 views

‘Went for a run’ vs. ‘went on a run’

I would like to know what's the difference between: I went for a run today I went on a run today. And when it's correct to apply each of those. Thanks a ton. Pablo.
2
votes
2answers
51 views

Unto: an unusual usage

In the King James version, Luke 23:15 says No, nor yet Herod: for I sent you to him; and, lo, nothing worthy of death is done unto him. It is clear from the context that Pilate is here telling ...
0
votes
2answers
196 views

Can I use the same preposition twice after the verb?

Can I use the same preposition twice after the verb? For instance: the expectations provided for for the grade
2
votes
2answers
156 views

preposition confusion in or on [duplicate]

I heard a person say " there is no room on the bus ". It for some reason sounded incorrect. However the most basic argument that we hear is that if it is a public transport, we use "on" but buses also ...
-2
votes
1answer
4k views

Usage of “reply”: Please reply to me or reply me (used in formal tone) [closed]

Which usage is correct? Please reply to me as soon as possible. Please reply me as soon as possible. In my understanding, people say, "Please reply my mail..." What about the ones I wrote above? I ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

“He weeps at school.” and “He weeps in school.” are both alright and the same meaning? [closed]

I wonder whether both sentence A and sentence B are correct and the same thing or not. Sentence A => "He weeps at school." Sentence B => "He weeps in school." Thanks.
0
votes
1answer
788 views

“In accordance to the rule” and “in accordance with the rule”

Is it correct to use preposition "to" in "in accordance to the rules" or it has to be "with" as in "in accordance with the rule"? I have found usage of "with" more frequent but have seen few instances ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Should I write “encode X into format Y” or “encode X in format Y”?

In technical writing involving such things as file formats, should one write "encode such-and-such into format Y" or write "encode such-and-such in format Y"? In other words, which preposition (into ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

in a system vs. on a system

If I want to describe something within the realm/environment/domain of something), do I say in or on? Example: Free software is common in GNU/Linux. Comment: I would like to express that free ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

standardized in vs. standardized by

When do you say something was standardized by and when do you say something was standardized in? It is my understanding that in is used to refer to a document describing the standard, while by is ...
-1
votes
4answers
163 views

What preposition do you use with 'dilemma'?

I want to say that at some point in my life, I had to choose between two majors for undergraduate studies. Is this sentence grammatically correct? I was in the dilemma of choosing between y ...
0
votes
3answers
352 views

Can I use “because” and “if” consecutively in a sentence?

This is the sentence in question: I would like to be able to make an unlimited number of wishes because if I wish for money, life, and love, I don't have to work and I don't have to be afraid of ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

Deterioration in vs deterioration of

Is it better to say, 'the injury caused a deterioration in his physical function', or 'the injury caused a deterioration of his physical functioning'?
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

“go at it with everything you've got” vs “go for it with everything you've got”

From the dictionary, I understand that go at means “undertake” and “tackle”, while go for means “go after with maximum efforts”. I feel that the latter above is redundant, because go for already ...
-1
votes
1answer
57 views

take a picture of sb. vs take a picture for sb [closed]

take a picture of sb. vs take a picture for sb. I feel "of" means that sb. is the subject of the picture you're taking. while "for" means something else could be the subject of the picture. Am I ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

“with” in Is that alright with everybody?

Is that alright with everybody? What does the word "with" mean here? Can I use "for" or "to" here? Thanks.
3
votes
2answers
420 views

Can 'once' be a preposition?

I'm motivated to ask this question because of this other question on ELL SE. It seems to me that that's a prepositional phrase, but I don't see 'once' in any lists of prepositions, and the only ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What is the right use for each expression? [closed]

You can call me at my cell phone. You can call me on my cell phone. You can call me from my cell phone. You can call me via my cell phone. What are the differences among them?
8
votes
3answers
1k views

When should I use “to do” and “to doing”

folks Here are two sentences that I find difficult to understand the grammar during my reading. Last year, two of her ministers suggested that convicted tycoons be pardoned if they could contribute ...
3
votes
3answers
145 views

Is it “Get notified on” or “Get notified of”

I am putting together a banner for a trade show to showcase our mobile app, and one of the bullets is: "Get notified on wishlist matches", but I'm not sure if the correct preposition should be on, of, ...
1
vote
1answer
132 views

What preposition should come after the word “embarrassment”?

In this line: Being too intimate in public places, ignoring social morality and causing embarrassment of others. Should the preposition after "embarrassment" be "of" or "to"?
0
votes
3answers
83 views

Single Preposition/descriptor for Multiple Subjects versus Multiple Ones

Could anybody please tell which one is correct? The President is going to give speeches in Belgium, in the Netherlands, in Luxembourg and in France versus The President is going to give ...
0
votes
1answer
393 views

Which preposition should follow “facilitated” (by or with)?

Which preposition is correct to use with facilitated? This product is facilitated with three powerful tools to help you in testing tasks. or This product is facilitated by three powerful tools ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

What is correct? 'At d/m/y hh:mm' or 'On d/m/y hh:mm'

What is correct, if I want to be specific? On 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase At 12/7/2015 12:35 I made a purchase
0
votes
1answer
75 views

“in” vs “on” vs “at” with “rarely used code paths”

Which of these alternatives is the best one? Bugs are often found on rarely used code paths Bugs are often found in rarely used code paths Bugs are often found at rarely used code paths I have a ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Difference between prep. at/by [closed]

What's the difference and what's more appropriate in following cases: We had a romantic dinner at the lake yesterday. We had a romantic dinner by the lake yesterday. (On a plane) I'd like ...
2
votes
2answers
79 views

Proper use of “of which”

I'm editing the following sentence: ORIGINAL: "The failure to warn the borrower of an inflated appraisal of which the lender is aware is a violation." Is the use of "of which" correct? It seems ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Usage of “among”

I think the preposition "among" is misused in the following sentence, but I'm not totally certain: "Constant border crossing in both directions has been studied among recent migrants from Mexico, ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

what is the name of this parts of speech adjective + preposition [duplicate]

what is the name of this parts of speech? Adjective + preposition and how can we use "availabvle of"
0
votes
2answers
194 views

Using “of” twice in a sentence [closed]

This is the homepage of XXX department of tamilnadu. I need to know whether I had used "of" correctly in the above sentence.
1
vote
1answer
129 views

comma to set off two verbs/phrases with different prepositions

If I write a sentence that makes use of two verbs each relying on a different preposition, is it advisable to add commas to structure the sentence and to guide the reader, or is it not necessary (or ...
0
votes
1answer
124 views

Which preposition is correct here?

on September 29 2014 in September 29 2014 I know with months, we should use in, and with days, we should use on. However I find the American way in writing the month before the day in dates to be ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Which preposition should I use here?

Consider the following sentence: "I am disappointed that you are leaving". Now I would like to let another person know the fact: "I would like to let you know that Mark is leaving which I am ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

After verbs, how does 'from' compare with 'of'?

(TL;DR) 1. I've been plagued by the postverbal use of the preposition 'of'. After verbs, when describing attributes like origin or source, what are the differences between 'from' and 'of'? The verbs ...
2
votes
1answer
113 views

What's the etymology of 'of' after verbs?

(TL;DR) While reading about preposition of on OED (eg avail of, enquire of), I encountered a possible explanation: quoted below, OED claims that the postverbal of originates from the genitive case, ...
2
votes
0answers
108 views

Differences between “in a list” and “on a list” [closed]

Generally speaking, is there any difference between saying "in a list" vs. "on a list"? There's already a similar question, but that was about one specific example with a specific answer; if ...
2
votes
3answers
818 views

Use of “by” to indicate means

The preposition of “by” is used to indicate how something is done as in: “We are going to travel by car” and “He made history by becoming the first man to sail around the world.” Now, how about ...
2
votes
3answers
169 views

What's the difference between “for a short time” and “in a short time”? [closed]

I submitted the following simple sentence to my tutor, and she told me to replace "for" with "in": I really want to know about his business because he has made so much money for a short time ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

'In the ranks' OR 'With the ranks'

Which of the following two phrases is correct? I'd put him right there in the ranks of the best anthropologists out there. OR I'd put him right there with the ranks of the best ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Over the past/last decade or during the past/last decade

Which is the correct usage: over the past/last decade or during the past/last decade?
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Keep discussing vs Keep discussing it

Is an object (in this case, God's existence) necessary in this sentence? We kept discussing. We kept discussing whether God exists. For example, with writing, it seems that an object ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

“Feed on” or “feed with”?

Is it correct to say, for example: "She fed him on lamb" as well as "She fed him with lamb"? Omitting the preposition and simply leaving the sentence as "She fed him lamb" sounds more acceptable to ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

How did the preposition “by” evolve its sense of “length x [by] width”?

The preposition "by" has a lot of special uses, but its etymology is not so easy as Etymonline wants us to believe. How did "by" develop as a preposition for areas, giving the length and breadth?
0
votes
2answers
97 views

Does one ride “in” a chariot, or “on” a chariot?

Is the proper term for riding a chariot "on" or "in"?
1
vote
2answers
74 views

What rules govern the ordering of phrases in a sentence?

When writing a sentence, I sometimes get stuck with the order of prepositional phrases if there happen to be a couple of them in a series. I cannot seem to place them next to the part they intend to ...
-4
votes
1answer
62 views

It is childish to complain against rules [closed]

It is childish to complain against rules. Correct it where necessary? Find the error.
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Tips for swimming vs Tips on swimming

I'm looking for help understanding the difference between 'tips for swimming' and 'tips on swimming'. Are there certain grammar patterns that follow tips for vs. the ones that follow tips on? Are ...
-1
votes
1answer
75 views

We are discussing useful things. We are discussing on useful things

We are discussing useful things. We are discussing on useful things. Which is the correct answer? Can we use preposition here?
0
votes
1answer
87 views

Is “out of” instead of “from” colloquial, always okay or simply wrong?

Here an example sentence written by a pupil of mine: Through the British Empire, which resulted out of Britain's urge to build up its economy, Britain was connected to a lot of different countries ...