Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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Is “the instant you left” correct?

Given this sentence: Frankly, I was deeply offended the instant you left me. This web page covers the sentence the instant I heard it which is grammatically similar to the above sentence, ...
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“Twice in” ? can preposition be used after twice?

Which is the correct sentence: He goes to museum twice a week He goes to museum twice in a week
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Out or out of which is it? [duplicate]

Which is correct 1 Get out the house. Or 2 Get out of the house? I've heard that the American English standard is the first one and the British English standard is the second one. Is that true? The ...
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29 views

Unable to solve this exercise regarding prepositions

I have some questions regarding prepositions which I am unable to solve, any help is appreciated. I am not sure if this is the correct place to ask. In the following passage, fill in each numbered ...
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English and correct grammar usage [closed]

Bridge over the river or bridge on the river which is correct grammar usage
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Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
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111 views

offer for vs. offer to

Which of the two sentences is correct? He refused the organization's offer for help. He refused the organization's offer to help. Did a few searches online, and I found that both are widely used. ...
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Does a verb need to be preceded by “to”?

A (very) common verb is "to be", another is "to have". But you can also say that "have" is a common verb. The question is, when does a verb (on its own) have to be preceded by the preposition "to"? ...
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91 views

Is it “I'm new to NYC” or “I'm new in NYC”?

As the title suggests, can we say both are correct or if one of them is wrong? Which phrase is "wrong" and why? I'm new to NYC I'm new in NYC I'm not a native speaker but I tended to ...
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549 views

“in ink”or “with ink”

Which sentence is right : Write in ink. Write with ink. I studied that with a tool you use 'with' like: "cut with knife" etc. so should it be sentence no. 2 . But when I goggled 'in ink', I got ...
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Because as a preposition

Recently, I have seen discussions that state that "because" is always a preposition. Can someone shed light on this idea? Thank you. UPDATE: The question that prompted me to post this question: Is ...
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592 views

Why is “I go to work by my bicycle” wrong? [closed]

Why must I say I go to work every day with my red bicycle and not … by my red bicycle"? Shouldn't I use by in front of a means of transport? For example, the following sentence ...
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Is “which” a preposition? Because because

Backstory: Back in 2013 the American Dialect Society appointed because Word of the Year. People had begun using a new syntax: noun-phrases and adjectives could now follow because. In response Geoffrey ...
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263 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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Preposition: evaluated on/at/as the borderline between?

The sentence goes: This resulted in my project being evaluated merely as "Sufficient", instead of (on/at/as) the borderline between "Great" and "Superb". So let's say that 80-90% would be "Great" and ...
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335 views

A word for knowing the truth but not wanting to believe it

What is the word for someone who knows someone else is lying but accepts it
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“The grades I have earned in/on/during my exchange semester”?

I guess the title explains my dilemma fully :) (perhaps it's important to note I'm writing an US English text). Thanks a lot!
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“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this "...
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67 views

“Wait for until” or “Wait until” [closed]

I encountered a gap-filling sentence like this: I'll wait __________ until you are ready. The answer in the book is "for". Does such a phrase exist? If it does, what is the difference between "...
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201 views

Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present? [closed]

I have read the following: we use over when something last up to the present /or future/ and we use during for a definite period of time. So is this wrong? I worked in the company IBM over the ...
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106 views

Expressions to use in English about “for” and “to”

This question is about “for” and “to” in terms of destination or direction. Which is right? Are they both right? Could you give me more examples and information about the usage of for and to? a. Is ...
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37 views

“array with objects” or “array of objects”

I’m confused regarding the use of “with” and “of”. Should I use “array with objects” or “array of objects”? Why?
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132 views

Is a server “in the Internet” or “on the Internet”

When talking about a server on/in the internet, which preposition would you use? In the question "In the Internet" vs. "on the Internet", it is recommended to [...] use "on". ...
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71 views

Can common prepositions following a verb be dropped freely?

Specifically, within the sentence "to sing along to/with", can to/with be dropped freely? While searching for information I found out this seems to be an idiom, so possibly my question should be ...
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in vs at + gerund

Consider the following examples : Would You be interested in buying a ticket Jerry is very good at playing drum The first sentence uses 'in' before the gerund while the second one uses 'at'. Why ...
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How would one specify that Noun 2 in “[Prepositional phrase] [Noun 1] and [Noun 2]” is not an object of the prepositional phrase?

I will give an example of this problem. In fact, this example is the reason why I am asking! I am blending a quote taken from a book into an assignment on which I am currently working. (Don't worry, I ...
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130 views

Proper preposition in 'Are you busy coming week?'

When I make a sentence: Are you busy coming week? which preposition should I put between busy and coming week?
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Repeating (or not) “to” after certain verbs

I googled it but I couldn't find the answer... maybe I didn't seek it in the proper way. My question is if "to" must be repeated in sentences such as the following ones: In the past, women ...
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“Human feelings are quite complex than of animals” - What should I put after “than”?

I want to write something meaning "humans have more complicated feelings than animals have." I wrote the following but I am not sure if "of" is the correct choice or not. Nevertheless, human ...
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63 views

Which preposition to use with “unbecoming”?

It is easy when you say something becomes or unbecomes someone. In this case, no preposition is needed. It is another story when the verb turns into the adjective “(un)becoming”. I would like to ...
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What is the word that functions as an object in a string of prepositions?

I noticed someone asking about using three prepositions in a row. I have a question related to this, but I can't post it as a comment to the same post (not enough reputations :-(). In examples like: "...
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63 views

Using 'at' with 'where'

A recent question asked about the impropriety of "Where's it at?" The question started me thinking about when at is allowed with where. My first thought was that ne'er the two should meet: at is ...
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Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence?

Does a contraction allow for the use of a preposition at the end of a sentence? Take the following sentence, for example: Where is it at (not correct grammar) and Where's it at? (unknown) You ...
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“Recommend me” vs. “Recommend to me” [duplicate]

In conversation, I hear people say: "Please recommend me a book." Or: "Recommend me a book, please." They omit "to," as in: "Please recommend to me a book." Or variations thereof, ...
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173 views

“On a (…) scale” or “at a (…) scale”?

First of all, a core sample is a small piece of rock obtained from the subsurface. The reservoir in this question refers to an oil reservoir. So here's the question. Is the following statement ...
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60 views

Is “At which he was really shocked” grammatical?

Last month Qziz was told that he had been laid off. At which he was really shocked Is the second sentence grammatical? Is the preposition at used appropriately here, or should I use a different one? ...
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Relaxed approach in/at/towards solving

What is the difference between the following and are they correct? He took a relaxed approach in solving the problem. He took a relaxed approach at solving the problem. He took a relaxed approach ...
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“I read the news on twitter that you asked me to” or “I read the news that you asked me to on twitter”

Is this sentence of mine grammatically correct? I read the news on twitter that you asked me to. or is it supposed to be: I read the news that you asked me to on twitter. I believe both ...
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“At the low level” vs “On the low level”

I wanted to say that a particular essay written by a student has a poor structure. So, I wrote "On the low level, your structure can be improved." But my PhD supervisor told me it should be "At the ...
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57 views

“But from” or “But rather from”?

Which one is more grammatically correct? But from or But rather from? I don't quite understand which one should be used. And I seriously doubt that the second one can be used at all. It didn't ...
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Is the “of” in “a lot of” a preposition?

Is "of" in "a lot of time" a preposition? I am working on a task about the identification of prepositions and their objects. I am not sure about "a lot of", and for some reason it seems unbreakable.
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In/at/about your company I like

I'd like to apply for a job at a company I haven't worked yet. Which is the correct preposition? At your company ____ I appreciate(/like) your high standard of quality, your effort to provide ...
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Which is right: “on Manhattan” or “in Manhattan”? [duplicate]

I want to meet some persons in Manhattan but I'm not sure how to message them about it. I'll meet you on Manhattan. (OR) I'll meet you in Manhattan.
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Prepositions and linking

I have stumbled upon a sentence while reading a book. While these self-defeating, stress producing patterns take their toll on your health and on your closest relationships, they maintain a firm grip ...
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710 views

Difference between “in” and “of” when used with the complement 'the department'

I used the following two expressions: in: students in the department of: students of the department What is the difference, if any, between them?
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Stranding of preposition in questions

I know that in sentences such as the following one, "from" is to be put at the end of the question: Where are you from? Does this rule apply also to the next one: Which movie is this scene ...
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“To live in” vs. “To live”

It is a question that follows up on the one posted today: "My hometown is a good place to live in." "My hometown is a good place to live." "Live" is usually used as an intransitive verb ...
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Should I use “awe of” or “awe at”?

The full sentence is: I express unqualified awe at Nathaniel.
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Explaining “despite” as a preposition

My question is provoked by a desire to better explain to my students grammatical conventions regarding "despite." I am finding that my own explanatory resources come up short in this regard. ...
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Preposition after conclude

If the police conclude that the person died by accident, should I say 'The police concluded in an accident' ? To me, this sounds like they finish the story by having an accident.