Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

2
votes
2answers
283 views

Form of verb after a preposition

I've heard a grammar rule which is, if there is any verb followed by a preposition except the 'to' preposition, the verb must have a 'ing'. As example, I've this sentence: I am going for playing. ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

What is the difference between the two sentences?

Students in Korea start dating around their 14th birthday. Students in Korea start dating at around their 14th birthday. What is the difference between the two sentences? Is there any problem in ...
5
votes
1answer
92 views

Teach in / teach on; class in / class on

Is there any difference between the usage of "in" or "on" in terms of class? I'm teaching a class in/on math(s). My father teaches a class in/on marine biology. I have a class in French to go to ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Prune from” or “prune of”?

I need to say (in passive voice) that a certain set of objects was cleaned from (pruned of/pruned from?) certain subsets of undesirable objects. I know that prune away [undesired objects] is one of ...
3
votes
5answers
161 views

“a question by you” or “a question of you”

Is it grammatically correct to say, "What a silly question of you..." My friend is trying to convince me that "What a silly question by you..." is the only correct way.
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Confused whether to use “in” or “of”

Which do I use in this phrase? ...and support the fact that the setting of the story is indeed in India. ...and support the fact that the setting in the story is indeed in India.
1
vote
1answer
73 views

Optionality of the preposition “at”

I see/hear many instances where the preposition "at" is omitted when a question starts with "What time ... ?" For example, I hear people say "What time are you guys meeting?" as opposed to "What time ...
7
votes
1answer
201 views

Why does Pinker classify these words as prepositions in *The Sense of Style*?

In his recent book, The Sense of Style, Steven Pinker explains permissible uses of commas and writes this sentence And when the writer pinpoints the coherence relation he has in mind with an ...
0
votes
1answer
284 views

Is “from … over … to …” correct?

I came across a title with a "from A over B to C" structure, namely "Facts and events from the USA over the UK to Australia" Now, I personally think this is incorrect (potentially a carbon copy ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Does code run in or on a thread?

Any programmers around? Which of the following is correct, or more common: The code runs in a background thread. The code runs on a background thread. That's it. Just a simple word different. As ...
0
votes
1answer
105 views

Can verb 'grant' be used with preposition 'with?'

Could someone explain to me if the word 'grant' can be used with 'with' and what it means? (I checked with many dictionaries, but couldn't find an example used in that way.) example sentence in an ...
0
votes
3answers
100 views

‘On’ vs. ‘at’ with immutable date-time string [duplicate]

I understand that on is used for dates and at for times, as in On vs At with date and time. But what can I use when I have a string consists of both a date and a time? The issue is that I can’t change ...
0
votes
3answers
107 views

Can we use the preposition “for” with the verb “scoot”?

I checked the dictionary and found that I can use 'scoot' with 'off' or 'over' but can I use it with 'for'? Example: Kalya got out of bed and scooted for the toilet
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Is it correct to say someone is in a certain role? [closed]

For example, "Is Connie in the role of administrator?"
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“predicted at” vs “predicted for”

If you are trying to say that a bus will arrive some time in the future do you use "predicted at 2pm" or "predicted for 2pm"?
2
votes
2answers
403 views

what's the difference between “important to” and “important for”?

When do we use important for and important to? What's the rule? For example: It's important to me. Or It's important for me. What's the difference between the two sentences?
0
votes
0answers
80 views

Countries “of the world” or “in the world”

How should I say: There are many threats faced by almost all countries IN the world or There are many threats faced by almost all countries OF the world I used to say "IN the world". ...
0
votes
2answers
86 views

“to” Preposition usage

Could you please let know why "to" Preposition is not used in first sentence, however in second one it is used. 1) I welcome John. 2) We welcome to “Veeru" junior. I request you to please let ...
0
votes
0answers
77 views

The meaning of “going over” something

I'm fond of old especially folk songs, but as a foreigner I often have troubles interpreting some phrases. Here is one from Wayfaring stranger: I'm going there to see my father I'm going there no ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Weird “genitive of relative pronoun” construction

In this youtube-video a non native speaker of English said the following sentence ... another verb, of which I've already talked about the present tense At first, I thought it was simply a ...
0
votes
1answer
61 views

Shall. I use a preposition here? [closed]

which one is correct? We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and friends were invited. Or We had a very small marriage ceremony where only close relatives and ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

“My father's hands” vs. “the hands of my father”

My father's hands → modified by a possessive noun The hands of my father → modified by a preposition When is "my father's hands" preferable over "the hands of my father", and vice versa?
0
votes
1answer
82 views

(allegedly) ungrammatical preposition stranding [duplicate]

Certain types of preposition-stranding are considered by some linguists to be "ungrammatical" in English, even though they do not seem remotely strange to me (an English speaker). I'm not talking ...
0
votes
1answer
140 views

'no matter in which way' or 'no matter which way?

Is in necessary in the phrase: It is the same, no matter in which way it is done. That is, is it acceptable to write: It is the same, no matter which way it is done.
-1
votes
2answers
124 views

What is the right preposition after “provide”? [closed]

Could you tell me which is the right preposition after "provide"? to provide.... activities and situations"
2
votes
3answers
120 views

What's the correct usage of “agree some days” vs. “agree on some days”?

"However, workers and employers can agree longer holidays". I have searched online. I also referred to two reference books : the blue book of grammar and grammar rules. I don't see a usage as of ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

which is correct “at the following” or “on the following”

i use it when i send link (URL for file or something) for some one, so what is the correct to say Please find file on the following link OR Please find file at the following link
1
vote
1answer
57 views

“usages” of except “for” and “times”

When I emailed somebody my weekly schedule, I wrote: I'm free except for the following times: MWF 4-5pm; TR 8-9am; F 10-12am. I'm not sure about the usage (or usages?) of the above bold words: ...
1
vote
2answers
486 views

Usage of 'out of' at the beginning of a sentence

Is it possible to use 'out of' in the sense of 'from among' at the beginning of a sentence? Would the examples below sound grammatical and natural with use of 'out of'in this sense? This story ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

going home and going to work [duplicate]

The other day I've learned that you cannot use "to" in the sentence "I am going (to) home". At the same time, you should use "to" with other place names. For example, I am going to work. Could ...
-1
votes
2answers
190 views

… to feel sick Tuesday afternoon / on Tuesday afternoon / from Tuesday afternoon. Which one is correct?

Are these all correct? He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling good on Monday, but he started to feel sick on Tuesday afternoon. He was feeling ...
1
vote
1answer
442 views

which is the best preposition to follow “proprietary”?

Is intellectual property "proprietary to" or "proprietary of" the company to whom it belongs?
0
votes
1answer
73 views

you’re more than due a vacation - due without for?

I do not understand how this sentence makes sense: you’re more than due a vacation Should it not be "due for"? If not, why? What dictionary entry (e.g. Oxford) would that be?
5
votes
2answers
649 views

“Please be considerate of…” vs. “please be considerate to…”

We have a sign on a door at work which slams when people aren't careful. It originally read: Please be considerate of those here and close this door quietly. Someone crossed out the of and ...
5
votes
2answers
498 views

If and Whether - or not? Interrogative and Conditional words

It's clear to me that in some situations, "if" works but "whether" does not: 1a) If it rains, I shall take my umbrella. 1b) Call me if rain is predicted. Also some where only "whether or not" will ...
2
votes
1answer
151 views

Which preposition to use with diagnosis?

The sentence is: "It has been 2 years since my diagnosis of/with cancer". Which is correct, "diagnosis of" or "diagnosis with" cancer? The meaning i want is: "It has been 2 years since I was ...
3
votes
1answer
301 views

“choose from” vs “choose out of” vs “choose among”

I tried to form a sentence like this: X chooses Y from three Zs. X chooses Y out of three Zs. I couldn't choose which one is better, and after googling found question on en.se and thread ...
3
votes
4answers
713 views

Difference between 'to the left' and 'on the left'

I have encountered these expressions today, when I was describing a photo. People are lining up in the picture. I wanted to explain someone who is standing next to the person on the far left. And I ...
1
vote
2answers
221 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
0
votes
2answers
31 views

“as if to” and “as if it were to”

Seen many sentences that had "as if to" and they had a comma before "as if to", which makes me think that "as if to" does not work as a preposition but as a clause. Is "as if to" the reduce form of ...
3
votes
3answers
485 views

“Attendant with” vs. “attendant to” vs. “attendant of”

Can the adjective attendant be used with the prepositions with, to, or of, and, if so, which is preferable? For example, I could say, "This manual describes the operation of the product and its ...
2
votes
3answers
709 views

What’s the difference between “for” and “to” in “for/to many people”?

Given these two versions of a sentence: For many people, dogs are the best friends. To many people, dogs are the best friends. I have following questions: What is the difference between ...
4
votes
3answers
498 views

“In here”, “from here”, and “at here”

I just read the discussed topic "look here vs. look at here": Which one is correct? "Look here" or "Look at here"? It's got me wondering. What is the reason for not using the ...
2
votes
0answers
52 views

Is it grammatically acceptable to write, “by March of 2015”? [duplicate]

The entire sentence would be something like: The Center will be established by March of 2015. I feel confident writing "in March of 2015", but this sentence must convey the fact that at any time ...
1
vote
1answer
88 views

Phrase type help needed

In the following sentence: I thank you for arranging the wedding. What type of phrase is for arranging the wedding? For is a preposition, but the fact there is not only a noun following it but ...
7
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “despite” outdated?

A friend of mine, a respected linguist, mentioned recently that "despite" (prep) is outdated. Whilst it is true that I hardly ever hear someone using the word in ordinary conversation, I still hear ...
0
votes
0answers
79 views

Is there a comprehensive look at articles of dress and their prepositions

As mentioned in the title, I'm looking for a comprehensive answer to the question of which prepositions go with different articles of clothing: e.g., in/with a tie; in/with a hat; in/with gloves, ...
0
votes
1answer
88 views

What preposition: “on the mobile” or “in the mobile”?

I read this: The battery's flat on the mobile. I think we should say in the mobile not on the mobile.
-4
votes
1answer
58 views

1 to 5 / by 1 to 5 / from 1 to 5 / 1 untill 5…?

What prepositions should I use when I want to say about a range of numbers? Example of use in a scene where each garden or car was numbered: There are beautiful flowers in the garden #3 to the ...
-2
votes
2answers
75 views

preposition problem! [closed]

i) Everyday drivers die ___ road accidents. ii) The majority of road accidents are caused ___ human error. iii) There occurs a lot of road accidents ___ Indian roads. Please help me out by ...