Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
93 views

Difference between “experiment on” and “experiment with"

I have two sentences: We experiment on both cases. We experiment with both cases. The different preposition will change the meaning. But it's difficult to find such nuances in a dictionary. What ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Attend the lectures on some language [closed]

I am writing something and I was curious, because I am not sure about the use of the preposition "on" in the following context. "I attended lectures on the Portuguese language for two semesters at ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

institutionalized + preposition?

I'm writing an essay on Reconstruction for English and stumbled into this problem. "the South had been heavily institutionalized ___ slavery" What would the correct preposition be in the blank? Into ...
0
votes
0answers
44 views

Which preposition is best: Efficacy of a model in predicting or efficacy of a model for predicting?

I'd like to use this phrase in a sentence, but I'm not sure whether 'in' or 'for' is more appropriate: Efficacy of a model in predicting Efficacy of a model for predicting Example: what is the ...
0
votes
3answers
64 views

“10 years in” vs. “In 10 years”

I read a headline: "10 years in, something happens". Is that grammatically correct or incorrect to give that headline? Any difference with "In 10 years, something happens"?
3
votes
1answer
62 views

Set something (a setting, variable, piece of configuration) to/at/for a specific value - programming and IT

During a code review, I noticed a phrasing in an error message that made me scratch my head a little. The message was something akin to: The value is set for {} where {} is a place-holder for a ...
9
votes
4answers
755 views

“[a/the] equivalent of” vs. “[a/the] equivalent for” vs. “[a/the] equivalent to”

Which of the following constructs sound more idiomatic to you? Is there any British/American equivalent to the French phrase "broyer du noir"? Is there any British/American equivalent for the ...
2
votes
1answer
84 views

“It's as same watch as the one I lost.” - What is wrong with the sentence?

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If not, what's wrong with them? It's as same watch as the one I lost. It's the same watch as I lost.
0
votes
0answers
38 views

“OF” between the subject and the verb “seem”?

When reading "The Wonderful Wizard of Oz," I came across the sentences as following: "'They of seem so helpless and frail. But there are none in the forest so bright as these.'" What is this "of" ...
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Why do we sometimes add extra “of” after “outside”? [duplicate]

When Jamie Foxx heard a car crash outside of his house, he rushed to help. Why does the sentence say "outside of his house" instead of "outside his house"? Why does it have this extra of?
4
votes
2answers
104 views

When did “the pub in Bleecker Street” become “the pub on Bleecker Street”?

In the streets is still used universally. As is out in the street. The casual fan of Sir Arthur's writings will recall, of course, that Mr. Holmes and Dr. Watson lived in Baker Street: ...while ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

In or On Microsoft Excel's Table/Cells/Column

I have a rather odd question here. I am delivering a presentation to a wide audience of Excel users. How do you go about using prepositions when it comes down to Microsoft Excel's Worksheet, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

throw into versus throw in to [duplicate]

Which is correct: "I threw every last ounce of my will into the command," or, "I threw every last ounce of my will in to the command"? In this sentence, "will" should be thought of as some psychic ...
0
votes
1answer
123 views

Usage of the preposition 'in' two times in a row?

The sentence: "This means that if you are in any way different, you could possibly find yourself in a column in a newspaper" I am not sure whether it is correct to have 'in' two times in a row, maybe ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Field of study and thesis

Is there any proper way to say what field of study of an engineering thesis is? In Polish I can say: Praca Dyplomowa Inżynierska na kierunku Informatyka. And it's often put on the front page as ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

successfully delivered vs delivered successfully? [duplicate]

I have sent a test email again and the email got successfully delivered. I have sent a test email again and the email got delivered successfully. In the above sentence which one is correct and how?
-2
votes
1answer
37 views

What is the differance? [closed]

I just fell it is hard to know what it should be (From or Since) e.g: I am not suprised that you didnot eat anything (from-since)the morning.
1
vote
4answers
4k views

on your desk or at your desk?

Please clarify the usage of right preposition on or at. For example: That paper is on your desk. or That paper is at your desk.
2
votes
2answers
51 views

“Guide for” or “guide of” [closed]

I am struggling with the correct preposition going after guide. Which sentence is correct? "that dog served as a guide for blind people" or "that dog served as a guide of blind people".
1
vote
2answers
107 views

At/in/within any time range

Which of the following should I say At any time range, report A has a higher total than report B. In any time range, report A has a higher total than report B. Within any time range, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“In the news” or “on the news”

I found this question in a textbook: Q: The company's stock tumbled _____ the news that it would have to recall over 30,000 tires that were produced in 2004. A: in B: for C: on Should ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

“Haven't used a fork in a week” or “haven't used a fork for a week”? [duplicate]

What's the correct/more common version of the two?
2
votes
2answers
95 views

Use of “upon” or “on” in phrase

In a spiritual phrase the segment says ...have mercy on me, a sinner. could you use "upon" rather than "on"? I feel that using "upon" personalizes the phrase better. Or is my grammar failing?
0
votes
3answers
97 views

Does one “wince in pain” or “wince with pain”?

I have seen both in common use and I want to know which is more preferable.
1
vote
4answers
2k views

“Within the past year” vs. “In the past year”

I'm having an argument with a co-worker about phrasing. We have a document that makes reference to someone having experience working "in the past year", and later it states "must have experience ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Is there any scenario where one would use 'in the server' rather than 'on the server'?

My sentence is 'The user should be created on the server.' OR 'The user should be created in the server.' I usually use 'on' in all cases but I am wondering if the act of creation is better described ...
2
votes
2answers
156 views

“A government of the people, by the people, for the people”

From a famous speech: A government of the people, by the people, for the people I believe the last part is clear (for the people). But what is the difference— in meaning— between of the people (...
1
vote
2answers
204 views

Except on vs. Except for (Mondays)

I guess this might have been asked before, but I want to know which is correct in the following context. I'm sorry that my English might not be as good as yours, I'm not a native English speaker and ...
1
vote
2answers
69 views

Should I use “for” in this case? [closed]

Which sentence below is correct? Or, are they both wrong? a) I hope the sign means for a good news, not a bad one. b) I hope the sign means for a good news, not for a bad one.
2
votes
1answer
700 views

“I have been to France.” vs. “I have been in France.” [duplicate]

Do we use "to" or "in" when talking about being to/in another location?
1
vote
1answer
540 views

At a shop or in a shop?

Which one is correct and what's the difference?: I was in a shop yesterday. I was at a shop yesterday.
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Adjunct phrase in a sentence with compound verbs

In a sentence with compound verbs, such as "Roll twice and use the better result for both roles.", does the phrase 'for both roles' apply to the whole sentence, or only to the second verb? Would the ...
5
votes
2answers
137 views

Is “say to X” grammatically correct but not colloquial? [closed]

So I'm living in South Korea and nearly everyone who is conversational in English says "say to X" instead of "tell X." For some reason, they avoid using "tell X" or "told X" and they stick to "say to ...
0
votes
2answers
170 views

“On launch” vs “at launch”

I've had a disagreement with a friend over the use of 'on' concerning the the launch of a certain product. He insists it should be 'at launch' while I believe either 'on launch' or 'at launch' is fine....
0
votes
2answers
253 views

“in Starbucks at the mall” OR “at Starbucks in the mall” [duplicate]

Which one is correct in terms of the combination of two locations. You work in Starbucks at the mall You work at Starbucks in the mall You work in Starbucks in the mall You work at ...
4
votes
2answers
928 views

“Meet” a friend or “meet with” a friend?

Is there any difference in usage? Meet a friend or meet with a friend. I'm meeting my friend today. I sometimes meet with my friends.
1
vote
4answers
321 views

Omission of “being” after prepositions

I've heard from somewhere in this website that being can be deleted after almost every preposition... which aroused many questions as to the usage of being for me. Today, I encountered this sentence: ...
4
votes
5answers
201 views

“Forbidden” / “permitted” directly followed by object

Is it correct to say "He is forbidden wine" or "Wine is forbidden him"? Most often these would be expressed as "He is forbidden to drink wine" or "Wine is forbidden to him," but I occasionally see the ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

“Joy crept into his face” vs. “Joy crept onto his face” [closed]

Please see the sentence: When he saw his grade, joy crept into/onto his face. At first glance, it seems like both could be correct, but they are not exactly synonymous. In what situation should ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

‘For’ at the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

I'm reading books in English and sometimes I see sentences like these: For are we not just at that point in the model where the slope will increase exponentially? What is the meaning of for in ...
0
votes
0answers
49 views

Work “at” or “in” a firm? [duplicate]

.. entry into ... to develop a long-term career in the firm. ... position at ABC Ltd... and develop a long-term audit and assurance career in the firm. Is either of these sentences wrong? I ...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

Prepositions related to the Internet and computers

I am not a native speaker and prepositions are the part of speech that troubles me more. Checking different posts from the site I've learnt that you say: On the Internet / On a website In an email ...
0
votes
0answers
75 views

preposition with.. 'care' for/about

Which one should I use? I care for/about you. He does not care for/about his health. And what exactly is the difference between the two while using them?
3
votes
2answers
156 views

Born to do something or born for doing something / Made for doing something or to do something

I was wondering if there is a difference between these 2 possibilities. In different songs I've heard: 'I was born for loving you', or 'Born to be wild', but I don't get if there's a real ...
3
votes
2answers
275 views

“A man with pride” vs. “a man of pride”

Is there any difference between "a man with pride" and "a man of pride"? Which one has the meaning closer to "a man who has pride"?
2
votes
1answer
99 views

“I'm all about that bass”

My question is all about the perceived formality of using about in the sentences like I'm all about that bass. How (in)formal is using about like this? OED has this definition for this usage: to ...
2
votes
3answers
477 views

The expression “It is one thing to … , but another to …”

I’ve just used this expression in the sentences below, and I wonder if the use of it can be somewhat misleading. More specifically, I’m talking about the “to” preceding “fully appreciate”. I’ve used ...
-1
votes
4answers
75 views

Should it be “… hung it in a tree.” or “… hung it on a tree.”?

Should it be "... hung it in a tree." or "... hung it on a tree."? The context is: A person hangs a collop in (on?) a tree.
0
votes
2answers
87 views

What does this “it” refer to?

Furthermore, Gilbert’s vibrant description of Naples’s pizza makes it sound unique and delicious. Does the "it" in the sentence above refer to the description or the pizza? Would it be better to ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

What is the right way to say “has recovered to within a threshold”?

Let's take the following sentence: X has recovered to within the maximum threshold of Y. What's really the right way to say this? Some ideas that come to mind are: to within the maximum ...