Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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What does “gut over” mean?

What does "gutted over" mean in Javad Zarif's recent tweet? Mr.Secretary, was it Iran that gutted over half of US draft Thursday night? and publicly commented against it Friday morning?
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2answers
82 views

Apply to a university to study/for studying..?

I'm writing my CV and do not know how to correctly say that: * After I graduated from X (//X is a high school), I applied to a university to study chemistry and also computer systems. * I'm ...
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2answers
94 views

“I will rob you of it” vs. “I will rob it of you”

Which of these is grammatically correct, and why? I will rob you of it I will rob it of you
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1answer
159 views

When should I use “born to” vs. “born of”?

I want to shorten the sentence "Memories can only ever be created now." I'm debating between "Memories are born of now" and "Memories of born to now". The former sounds better, but is their a ...
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2answers
290 views

'Opposite to' or 'opposite'?

Which usage of the word opposite is correct? Their house is opposite to the Red Cross Hospital. Their house is opposite the Red Cross Hospital. I cannot seem to find a definite answer on ...
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2answers
95 views

Emphasis is put on relation of A and B, instead of/on

Having the following sentence, I'm not sure how to use prepositions after 'instead': The emphasis is put on the relation between A and B, instead of on A and B themselves. Is "instead of on" ...
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1answer
73 views

Is this “debate” a noun or a verb?

Monday's vote opens the floor to debate on the bill and the Senate is expected to schedule a full vote by week's end.
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1answer
149 views

History of the non-rule that proscribes ending a sentence with a preposition [duplicate]

Famously, if not accurately, Winston Churchill is supposed to have responding to an editor who had "fixed" a sentence ending with a preposition by writing, "This is the sort of thing up with which I ...
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1answer
413 views

“Enquire about whether” vs. “enquire whether”

I'm writing to you to enquire whether you have a need for I'm writing to you to enquire about whether you have a need for Which is proper?
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1answer
107 views

'On the web' vs. 'In the web' [duplicate]

When do we use 'on the web' and when 'in the web'? Roombeats provides image content marketing solutions by linking images to product or brand information and distributing it on the web.
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1answer
91 views

“A challenge to X” vs. “a challenge for X”

Nile countries are facing tremendous challenges for food security,... Should I use "a challenge for" or "a challenge to" in the above sentence?
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2answers
94 views

“The first step in making” vs. “the first step on making” vs. “the first step at making”

I have this sentence: I strongly believe that the first step in making the most efficient solution for any problem is analyzing it well. Would it be better to use either of the following? ...
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2answers
141 views

“There is a car on/in the street”

Do we use in or on when we want to talk about some action or event that takes place in/on the street? This car has been parked [in/on] our street for a week now. There's nobody [in/on] the ...
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1answer
96 views

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.”

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.” Is that correct? Why there is "FOR", would it not work simply with "WHEN"? “it would not be fair to everyone else ...
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3answers
107 views

Does “a value between two values” imply the two values are included within the range?

For example, if a there is a validation message that specifies that a number "must be a value between 1 and 100" does that imply that 1 and 100 are part of the allowed set of values? I would suggest ...
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2answers
147 views

Which is correct, “be embodied in” or “be embodied within”?

Which is correct, "be embodied in" or "be embodied within"? There is hope for the future of the great river, and it is embodied within the reverence with which she is still held. (from a ...
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5answers
565 views

“Work at home” vs. “work from home”

In the context of someone working for an employer but one day doing their office work at home, rather than at the office, which one is the correct usage — "work from home" or "work at home"? For ...
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2answers
126 views

What's the difference between: people in England, people of England and English people? [closed]

People in England clean glass with newspaper. People of England clean glass with newspaper. English people clean glass with newspaper. I would like to know which one sounds most natural. I would ...
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1answer
88 views

Which sentence is grammatically correct? [closed]

I need to say that something is of the same material as ash but not in a phrase. I'm looking for a short adjective and noun combination. Which of these two is correct? homogeneous to ash or ...
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1answer
672 views

“You did a good job [at/in] answering my questions”

Which phrase is grammatically correct? good job at answering my questions good job in answering my questions good job answering my questions Or, are all the phrases correct?
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0answers
21 views

Is the “for + proposition” form still used nowadays? [duplicate]

I am currently studying English and as such enjoy reading English books from time to time; for instance I have recently been reading the fifth book of A Song of Ice and Fire since the French version ...
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4answers
173 views

“Lodged a complaint to the Authorities” or “Lodged a complaint with the Authorities”

I have a question regarding the usage of the words to and with in the sentence "He lodged a complaint to/with the Authorities". Which is correct? Note: Lodge in this context is "to present (a ...
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1answer
66 views

Usage of “odyssey” and “splendid”

I started my odyssey on the splendid world of mathematics when... Is this a right way to use the word "odyssey"? Is "odyssey on sth." correct? Can I use "splendid" to describe the world of ...
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1answer
765 views

“provided me” or “provided to me” [duplicate]

I was writing a letter and got confused with this line. I am thankful for the opportunities that have been provided me during my tenure. or should it be I am thankful for the ...
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1answer
71 views

How to say “rocket at launch”?

If I write "rocket at moment X", "rocket in assembly", "in flight", how do I say when it's about to be launched? "At launch"? Sounds like "I eat rockets at lunch".
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0answers
14 views

In windows 8 vs on windows 8? [duplicate]

I got an error yesterday in windows 8 vs on windows 8? Which one is more appropriate also what is the rationale behind it? Non native here thanks. I should add that my preference is 'in' windows 8.
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3answers
143 views

“Verify with me” vs. “verify for me”

Which would be more appropriate when asking for address verification: Can you verify with me you mailing address? Can you verify for me your mailing address? Though I believe this ...
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2answers
510 views

“in front of” or “opposite”

Imagine my house is on the left side of the road, and if there is a bus halt on the left side of the road and a vegetable stall on the right side of the road, when I talk about the bus halt, should I ...
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1answer
73 views

Ambiguity about passive in my textbook

In my textbook, it said "In an active sentence we need to include the agent as subject; using a passive allows us to omit the agent by leaving out the prepositional phrase with by" Ex: ...
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3answers
285 views

Can “once” and “since” be followed by a V-ing clause?

Consider these examples: Since the board realized that the figures are increasing, they have been searching for a new campaign. Once the board realized that the figures are increasing, they ...
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1answer
39 views

“The behavior is seen in other properties” vs. “for other properties”

The same behavior can also be seen [in/for] other properties such as the color and the mass. Which one is correct here, in or for? EDIT: Adding more context: The charge of quarks increases ...
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2answers
288 views

Why are you “On a train” yet “In a car” when you are inside both vehicles? [duplicate]

Why are you "On a train" yet "In a car" when you are inside both vehicles? "On a bike" makes sense but "On a plane" seems wrong as you are actually inside the plane rather than on it.
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1answer
167 views

Does 'for' always comes after search? [closed]

Is it a rule that 'for' should follow after word 'search'? Does any form of search should be followed by for? For example, searched for searching for
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2answers
277 views

phrasal verb or preposition at the end of a sentence?

"That bullet point is simply in place to ensure that projects are followed through with." I got blasted for ending the above sentence with with, and I feel it's a phrasal verb so is okay. Am I ...
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1answer
307 views

Preposition with phrase passed away [closed]

Is "My grandmother passed away from cancer last night" grammatically correct and acceptable?
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2answers
92 views

Buy it at or for?

When I buy something and pay $5 for it, what would I say? I bought it at $5. or I bought it for $5.
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2answers
72 views

Difference between 'retreated into' and 'retreated back into'

What is the difference between retreated into and retreated back into? They retreated into Pakistan
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1answer
107 views

Why we use preposition while a verb has own meaning? [closed]

I want to know about usage of preposition in sentence where a verb has own meaning but we put preposition why? Pleas answer me briefly
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5answers
94 views

Use of “of” to define objects?

I argue that the "United States of America" is different than the "Kingdom of Cambodia", for instance, because one uses "of" to describe a relationship with something larger (ie: the continents of ...
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2answers
208 views

Why is it necessary to use the word *else* in this sentence?

I found a writing skills question in Barron's PSAT test guide that was confusing to me. Mary is as fast as, if not faster than, anyone in her class and should be on the team. The book states ...
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0answers
9 views

Placement of preposition [duplicate]

Which of the following is the correct placement of of - 1) Separate the subject from the group which he is a part of. 2) Separate the subject from the group of which he is a part.
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3answers
457 views

What preposition is used with “sit” and “computer”?

I personally would say "to sit at the computer", but a friend of mine said he heard "to sit on the computer" from a native speaker. That does not sound right to me at all, and I trust my guts, but ...
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0answers
14 views

“An answer to the question” vs. “an answer for the question” [duplicate]

Which is grammatical: She had no answer to the question. She had no answer for the question.
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1answer
66 views

“In extensive grounds” vs. “on extensive grounds”

If there is a large house, can I say either of the following? The house stands in extensive grounds. The house stands on extensive grounds. Which one makes sense?
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1answer
1k views

“In the last month” vs. “last month”

I have seen that movie six times in the last month. I have seen that movie six times last month. Why?
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2answers
102 views

**in** an equilibrium or **at** an equilibrium

I often search for valid collocations using google with a specific query phrase. In case of the phrase in question, i.e. in/at an equilibrium I have a problem since both seem to be used almost equally ...
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2answers
160 views

Is that right to say “For the first time we show…”

In a PhD thesis, I would like to express that I am the first one who has proved the result. Is it right to say "For the first time we show..."?
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2answers
200 views

Difference between “sleeping with Sean Parker” and “sleeping on Sean Parker”?

In the movie Social Network, there is a scene where Sean Parker corrected a sentence said by a girl who he just spent a night with: She was rather astonished when she realized the man standing in ...
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2answers
521 views

“Critical in” vs. “critical for” vs. “critical to” [closed]

I am confused about the correct preposition to use before achieving in this sentence: Tracking service delivery is critical in achieving the goals of the health program. I feel "critical for ...
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2answers
156 views

“Demands on your time” vs. “demands for your time”

I am attempting to acknowledge that someone is extremely busy with various things needing his attention. However, I am uncertain of the phrase for this. Is it: I acknowledge that you have many ...