Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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Preposition with 'line' when quoting from a text (prose or poetry) with numbered lines? [duplicate]

When referring to a line or lines in/from (?) a text with numbered lines, is it "the idea expressed in line 25 is such and such"; "in line 25, the word 'lisp' is a clear indication that…" or "the ...
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1answer
39 views

“is to” or “is how to”?

Is it better to say "is to" or "is how to"? For example: A challenging problem is to analyse the runtime effects. or should it be: A challenging problem is how to analyse the runtime ...
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2answers
332 views

What does “as” represent for in “Cantor quits as Majority leader” and “Cantor to resign as Majority leader”?

Today’s New York Times reported Eric Canter’s defeat in Primary election in Virginia under the headline: “Eric Cantor to step down as House Majority leader” followed by the text copy: “Representative ...
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3answers
178 views

Calculation by, by means of, through, from

Which of the following sentences regarding the calculation of something should be preferred? The calculation of the result by this equation... The calculation of the result by means of this ...
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1answer
94 views

“solve with” vs “solve for”

I would like to get a clarification whether I do understand and use those two phrases correctly or not. The context is solving a mathematical problem. solved with sth - means a problem is tackled ...
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21 views

“Due to” vs. ”Because of” [duplicate]

I would please like to know which of the following sentences is the more accurate, and why that is so: Due to recent economic problems, it has been difficult for many to find a job. Because of ...
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131 views

Is “At which address should I come?” correct?

The sentence is, At which address should I come? Which preposition should be used? Can I use "on"?
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255 views

Schedule in the next week

Which one is correct? I'd like to schedule a meeting with you [in/for/no preposition] the next week.
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90 views

Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
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65 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
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61 views

When should you use “to” following a “why”?

I've always wondered why some people add a to after Why when framing a question. I have always wished to know this, but I keep forgetting to ask and today I came across a tweet that made me post this ...
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1answer
297 views

“nervous about” and “nervous of”

While going over the correct prepositions to use with adjectives, I came across a situation I can't define. I'm using a Longman dictionary and a Cambridge grammar, but neither defines the difference ...
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146 views

Is a movie played in a theater or at a theater?

Do we say a movie is being played in a theater or at a theater?
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3k views

Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley

Which is the correct answer to fill in the gap in "Beer is made ____ yeast, water, hops and malted barley"? of from with out of I am leaning toward '2'. "Made from" can be used to describe a ...
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1answer
42 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
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2answers
59 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
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1answer
128 views

Replacing “to” and other prepositions [closed]

One of the requirements of my English final includes removing all prepositions from a previously written essay. I'm having trouble getting rid of prepositions like "to", "in", "of", and other common ...
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2answers
306 views

What evidence is there that 'to' belongs to any particular part of speech?

What part of speech is to as in: I need to know. To err is human, to forgive divine. What am I to do? This question is not really about the difference in meaning between the examples. It is a ...
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351 views

Which preposition follows curiosity? [closed]

Which preposition follows the word curiosity? Ex. To explore their curiosity (for/about/with) science?
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1answer
538 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
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36 views

Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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Use of preposition 'to'

I hope to understand the use of the preposition to gerunds and the overall structure of the following sentence. Normally the use of to is to specify a destination or a purpose but here the way it is ...
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3answers
710 views

Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'? [duplicate]

Typically without is used to mean not having something. E.g. He went to work without his pants on. However, I'm wondering if it can be used for outside the bounds of. We do this with within. ...
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212 views

“In the mid of 1990s” Is it grammatically correct?

What is the correct way to write the following phrase? In the mid of 1990s What are the (writing) variants of that expression? (I just want to know, to diversify my writing.) Thank you.
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119 views

“Due to” vs. “owing to” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between due to and owing to? Are there some specific situations when owing to is to be used rather than due to?
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2answers
196 views

Use of 'in which …' to modify a noun

Consider the sentence Why did the Egyptians not develop sculpture in which the body turned and twisted through space like classical Greek statuary? Could someone please explain the use of "in ...
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2answers
117 views

Stay up-to-date “with” or “on”?

Suppose I want to say Stay up-to-date with/on technology news Do I use with or on?
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3k views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
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47 views

Can 'on' be used in a temporal setting?

I usually replace upon with on because it sounds less pompous. Is it correct to do so when the meaning is temporal? Consider Languages change (up)on contacting others. Should I replace upon with ...
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897 views

“Internship at” or “Internship in”?

Which one is correct in what case? I have found someone suggesting that you use "at" for organizations and "in" for fields or disciplines, e.g., I've got an internship at NATO, and he's got an ...
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121 views

Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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94 views

Rephrasing “patient with suspected cancer” [closed]

Is it possible to form a sentence like A patient who is suspected for/with/?? cancer and if so, what is the correct preposition after suspect?
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3answers
854 views

“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
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8answers
292 views

What is the difference between “fill” and “fill in”?

I am confused by fill and fill in. I checked online, and both forms are used in fill a hole fill in a hole So I am wondering is there any difference in meaning between them? If not, what's the ...
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3k views

“in a similar way as” or “in a similar way to”?

Consider the two statements: A is constructed in a similar way as B and A is constructed in a similar way to B Which one is correct, or can they both be? By the way, I originally thought of the ...
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100 views

Does one work in or on an aeroplane?

In an exam paper, there was a picture of an air stewardess in the aeroplane serving passengers. One of my pupils wrote the following: The air stewardess works on an aeroplane. Shouldn't it be ...
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36 views

Is there a difference between “introduction to” and “introduction into”?

“Introduction to” seems to be much more common than “introduction into”, but is the latter an acceptable alternative? If it is, is there some difference in meaning, tone, or connotations? I was ...
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26 views

“Calculations on/about the limiting behaviour”

I did some calculations ___ the limiting behaviour of some functions, when n tends to infinity. Is it about, on, or even something else?
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4answers
225 views

How do I define “by” versus “through” to my students?

Over the past five years, my high school students have stopped using "through" as a preposition and use "by" almost exclusively. For example, they might write, "they will do this by a detailed ...
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38 views

To start in or at a company?

I am not sure about what is right: I can start my career at an international company. or I can start my career in an international company. For me at sounds appropriate?
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895 views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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62 views

“to” or “of” or both whilst referring to cities and places

I saw these billboards today: Turkey home of Istanbul Turkey home of Nemrut Nemrut is a mountain in Turkey with prehistoric monuments, and I think home of is the new slogan for Turkey. ...
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“of the” before adjectives [closed]

I am writing a technician text and oft have a sentence with a lot “OF THE” before adjectives like a: First example: This is a black spring OF THE new lock OF THE left door OF THE yellow car. Second ...
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54 views

What's the difference between 'working in/from' and 'working at' a coffee shop?

Does working at a coffee shop necessarily imply being employed there? Is working at a coffee shop never synonymous to working in/from the coffee shop?
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3answers
95 views

The wrong group to be “in” Or “on”?

'They either participate with some decorum, or recognise this is the wrong group to be on!' Is the above sentence idiomatically and grammatically correct? Can 'on' and 'in' be used in this ...
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47 views

“Weather in [place]” vs. “weather at [place]” [duplicate]

Which of the following is the better preposition? How is the weather in Bangalore? How is the weather at Bangalore?
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1answer
29 views

How to refer to a list?

I have a list containing some information and I need to refer to that list. Is a sentence "From the list above ... " ok? Example: item 1 item 2 item 3 From the list above is obvious there is a ...
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2answers
81 views

Which preposition to use with “forum”

I would hugely appreciate your help thinking through the tagline for a new online forum we are creating. The current version reads: A Forum on Our Economy, National Security and Sustainability. ...
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2answers
96 views

He flew like the wind [closed]

In the sentence He ran up the stairs up the stairs is a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb to modify the verb ran, But what about the sentence He flew like the wind? Is like the wind ...
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170 views

“Witness to” vs. “witness of”

What is the difference in meaning between "a witness to" and "a witness for"? E.g., Then I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God... ...