Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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“Get an idea on/of something”

In general, is it better to say get an idea on or get an idea of something? Here are some examples: In order to get an idea on how to build this house... In order to get an idea of how to ...
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2answers
68 views

Adding “on” to many verbs

We have a local newscaster who inserts the word "on" into almost every sentence. For example, he might say,"The rain will move on out." The extra preposition grates on me, but I have not been able ...
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1answer
68 views

The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
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1answer
614 views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
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1answer
49 views

What does “in the east” mean here?

I just read this sentence "when the wind was in the east a smell came across the harbour" from the Ernest Hemingway's novel The Old Man And The Sea: Two questions: What does "in" the wind mean? ...
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2answers
72 views

“Confined in the case”, “confined on the bus”

The preposition “to” is widely used in the phrase “be confined to”. My question is, can I use “in” or “on” in the following sentences? Someone is confined in the case. Someone is confined on ...
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2answers
86 views

Up- vs Down-here

Geographically speaking, up is north and down is south (if that's wrong, my entire question is dumb). My friends keep saying they are doing something "down here" when they are actually talking about ...
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1answer
55 views

Repeat “on” in a list?

Consider the following sentences. My question is: which one is grammatically correct? (If neither is, what is the correct formulation?) [the name of a chapter], in which he summarizes his past ...
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2answers
129 views

When are “from” and “by” interchangeable?

Today I listened to a performance by Stephen Lynch in which he said "A public service anouncement from Stephen Lynch" which confused me, a non-native English speaker. Is the usage of "from" correct ...
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3answers
141 views

“put your coat on” and “put on your coat” but not “depend on someone” and “depend someone on*”

Why can you say "put on your coat" and "put your coat on" but not "depend on someone" and "depend someone on*"? Why are adverbs ("on" in the first sentence) mobile, whereas prepositions ("on" in the ...
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3answers
160 views

“During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company” — does it mean that 1988 was included?

I am an ESL student and I wonder what the following sentence means. During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company Does it mean that 1988 was included? I am not quite sure about the meaning ...
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3answers
109 views

“Skyscrapers are of various shapes” vs. “skyscrapers are various shapes”

Skyscrapers are of various shapes. Skyscrapers are various shapes. Why do we use of in the sentence above? Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?
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265 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
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1answer
105 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I ...
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4answers
145 views

Preposition for “to be qualified”

Would you please tell me whether the following fragment is grammatically correct? ...led me to be qualified in various science Olympiads. For instance, I ranked 21st among... I know that ...
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2answers
91 views

Position of “to” in a sentence

Which of the following is grammatically correct and why? I got less time to focus per course. I got less time per course to focus on. Edit: I want to convey the idea that because I took ...
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2answers
76 views

“To mentor someone during a project” vs. “to mentor someone on a project”

..., whom I mentored during his final semester's project. ..., whom I mentored on his final semester's project. Which of these two is grammatically correct? Since I am not talking about ...
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1answer
36 views

Drag and drop video into OR drag and drop video in to [duplicate]

Which is more correct? I’ve created a web page that you can just drag and drop the videos in to: http://... OR I’ve created a web page that you can just drag and drop the videos into: http://...
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1answer
331 views

“Succeed in” or “succeed at”

Are "He succeeded in business" and "He succeeded at business" both idiomatic? What is a good resource for learning idiomatic verb-preposition pairs?
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2answers
184 views

When is 'over and above' used?

When is the expression 'over and above' used instead of just 'over' or just 'above'?
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4answers
3k views

Use of “I for one” [closed]

When we say “for one” in a sentence, what does it mean? I heard a sentence in a TV program where Robin Hood said: Who will bear this injustice? I, for one, will not. As I understand it, “I ...
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1answer
60 views

consider using one to other

Me and my tutor at work came across this sentence which I understood slightly different in our language than him: Where possible, consider alternative diuretic therapy (e.g., thiazides) to more ...
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1answer
350 views

Difference between “at” and “in” [closed]

In some time related sentences I saw expressions like in the morning and at night. For example I work in the morning and I work at night What is the difference here? Why does the ...
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1answer
102 views

gerunds: difference between “on doing”, “by doing”, and “in doing”?

What is the difference between "on doing", "by doing", and "in doing"? A difficult point to French learners of English as in all three cases, you would say "en faisant". Example sentences, taken ...
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1answer
41 views

Is this “of” means category relationship?

Here is the context. The dictionary define one meaning of "of" as expressing the relationship between a general category and the thing being specified which belongs to such a category. Is it fitted ...
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3answers
123 views

Can I use the word “not” after a preposition?

Can I write something like: among people from that country and among people from not I know it can be easily rewritten as: among people that are from the country and among people that are ...
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2answers
119 views

How to convey the direction of a relation between two things?

There can be asymmetric relations between two entities. E.g. Parent-child. Both entities are related, but neither relates to the other as the other relates to it. I'm writing a philosophy paper that ...
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1answer
222 views

“With use of” or “with the use of”?

Do you solve engineering problems with use of programming methods, or, Do you solve engineering problems with the use of programming methods ? Which one is true? Or are both of them false? If so, ...
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1answer
115 views

“There is a window in the wall.”vs.“There is a window on the wall.”?

My question is which preposition should be use here. Besides, can I say “the wall with a window in it”? Or do you think “the wall with a window” is good enough?
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1answer
42 views

Everything shimmered “through” the heat haze OR Everything shimmered “in” the heat haze

Which is correct? Everything shimmered through the heat haze OR Everything shimmered in the heat haze
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3answers
230 views

Is the usage “off for lunch” correct?

Is the usage (someone) is off for lunch correct? I think the above usage is right but I am not pretty sure. Related question
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2answers
56 views

“On the header” vs. “in the header”

Include logo on the header of all the pages. In the above sentence, is it correct to use on or should it be in? I have a decent idea of where to use on and in most of the time. But in the above ...
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2answers
79 views

“by” before the gerund, when is needed

Please consider the follow two sentences: It is hard to agree that by increasing sports facilities is the best way to improve public health. The best way to improve public health is by ...
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89 views

Said Monday vs Said on Monday

Banks such as CaixaBank, Banco Sabadell and Catalunya Banc, which are based in Catalonia, would face serious problems and could go under if the northeastern region were to declare its independence ...
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1answer
54 views

Whether I should use “without” or to use “except” in this sentence?

I have read a sentence in “New Concept English”, that is, Harrison had thought of everything except the weather. Here is the context: Harrison lived in Mediterranean for many years before ...
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When talking about a country, what is correct : stay in or stay at [duplicate]

I want to say: 'I Wish your stay in Country A is something'. I'm not sure about the preposition, will it be your stay inor your stay at. I'm inclined towards in but can't reason why.
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1answer
533 views

Starting a sentence with because

Because PaymentX stores the user's credit card details for you and sends your server a token to charge the card, if you use our SDK, your PCI compliance scope is greatly reduced compared to the case ...
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64 views

Is it “island of ###” or “island ###”? [duplicate]

Should I write/say "Island of Guernsay", "Island of Madagascar", "Island of Taiwan", etc. or is it OK to write/say "Island Guernsay", "Island Taiwan", etc without "OF" as it is in German and Dutch? ...
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42 views

“Arguments to the topic” or “arguments for the topic”?

I'm not sure whether it is possible to say "arguments for the topic" or "arguments to the topic" when I want to express opinions that would relate to the given topic.
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55 views

Experience in war vs on war

My question is that should we say I have experience in war or I have experience on war? Please, clear the fog in my head. Thanks
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64 views

Using “to” along with “help”

Do we use to along with help? This book helps to improve our knowledge or This book helps improve our knowledge Which one of these are correct?
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146 views

Up one's ass vs. In one's ass

Why is stick/shove/etc up one's ass much more common than in/into one's ass?
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2answers
179 views

How to use the word 'contrary'?

Is it right to say contrary to our interest to reduce the size of the paper I want to say that we want to reduce the size of the paper but we cannot do it, due to specific reasons.
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1answer
648 views

Is it “query on …” or “query about …”

Which is grammatically correct? Query on Physics Final Query about Physics Final Say if this was a subject field in an email you're about to send to a teacher. Which would be better ...
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4answers
143 views

Why is the preposition “in” used twice in this sentence: In 1934, in February…?

This sentence is in the book pattern complete sentence is: In 1934, in February, when the dust was still so thick in the Minnesota air that my parents couldn't always see from the house to the ...
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2answers
109 views

Prepositions after objects [duplicate]

I live in the house next to/close to the cinema. I live in the house that is next to/close to the cinema. I go to the school in front of/behind my house. I go to the school that ...
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80 views

Preposition IN Vs Preposition ON when writing by an electronic device

It is not clear to me, when to use IN and when to use ON in sentences such as: "Keep it organized on your computer or in a notebook." What about if the gadget selected to write were a ...
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2answers
1k views

“Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?

Which of the following sentences is correct? We are glad to provide a recommendation of a good work you did. We are glad to provide a recommendation for a good work you did.
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233 views

“provide” vs. “provide with”

I am wondering if the following sentence is correct: We add the information their study provides with to our article. The context is: their study provides with some information. And we add the ...
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2answers
84 views

“Take offense” usage

What prepositions do I use with "take offense"? Specifically: "I take offense at you over your words" Are at and over correct?