Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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Adjunct phrase in a sentence with compound verbs

In a sentence with compound verbs, such as "Roll twice and use the better result for both roles.", does the phrase 'for both roles' apply to the whole sentence, or only to the second verb? Would the ...
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135 views

Is “say to X” grammatically correct but not colloquial? [closed]

So I'm living in South Korea and nearly everyone who is conversational in English says "say to X" instead of "tell X." For some reason, they avoid using "tell X" or "told X" and they stick to "say to ...
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109 views

“On launch” vs “at launch”

I've had a disagreement with a friend over the use of 'on' concerning the the launch of a certain product. He insists it should be 'at launch' while I believe either 'on launch' or 'at launch' is ...
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126 views

“in Starbucks at the mall” OR “at Starbucks in the mall” [duplicate]

Which one is correct in terms of the combination of two locations. You work in Starbucks at the mall You work at Starbucks in the mall You work in Starbucks in the mall You work at ...
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317 views

“Meet” a friend or “meet with” a friend?

Is there any difference in usage? Meet a friend or meet with a friend. I'm meeting my friend today. I sometimes meet with my friends.
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306 views

Omission of “being” after prepositions

I've heard from somewhere in this website that being can be deleted after almost every preposition... which aroused many questions as to the usage of being for me. Today, I encountered this sentence: ...
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182 views

“Forbidden” / “permitted” directly followed by object

Is it correct to say "He is forbidden wine" or "Wine is forbidden him"? Most often these would be expressed as "He is forbidden to drink wine" or "Wine is forbidden to him," but I occasionally see the ...
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45 views

“Joy crept into his face” vs. “Joy crept onto his face” [closed]

Please see the sentence: When he saw his grade, joy crept into/onto his face. At first glance, it seems like both could be correct, but they are not exactly synonymous. In what situation should ...
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26 views

‘For’ at the beginning of a sentence [duplicate]

I'm reading books in English and sometimes I see sentences like these: For are we not just at that point in the model where the slope will increase exponentially? What is the meaning of for in ...
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47 views

Work “at” or “in” a firm? [duplicate]

.. entry into ... to develop a long-term career in the firm. ... position at ABC Ltd... and develop a long-term audit and assurance career in the firm. Is either of these sentences wrong? ...
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83 views

Prepositions related to the Internet and computers

I am not a native speaker and prepositions are the part of speech that troubles me more. Checking different posts from the site I've learnt that you say: On the Internet / On a website In an email ...
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51 views

preposition with.. 'care' for/about

Which one should I use? I care for/about you. He does not care for/about his health. And what exactly is the difference between the two while using them?
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Born to do something or born for doing something / Made for doing something or to do something

I was wondering if there is a difference between these 2 possibilities. In different songs I've heard: 'I was born for loving you', or 'Born to be wild', but I don't get if there's a real ...
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2answers
161 views

“A man with pride” vs. “a man of pride”

Is there any difference between "a man with pride" and "a man of pride"? Which one has the meaning closer to "a man who has pride"?
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1answer
91 views

“I'm all about that bass”

My question is all about the perceived formality of using about in the sentences like I'm all about that bass. How (in)formal is using about like this? OED has this definition for this usage: to ...
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3answers
216 views

The expression “It is one thing to … , but another to …”

I’ve just used this expression in the sentences below, and I wonder if the use of it can be somewhat misleading. More specifically, I’m talking about the “to” preceding “fully appreciate”. I’ve used ...
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69 views

Should it be “… hung it in a tree.” or “… hung it on a tree.”?

Should it be "... hung it in a tree." or "... hung it on a tree."? The context is: A person hangs a collop in (on?) a tree.
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79 views

What does this “it” refer to?

Furthermore, Gilbert’s vibrant description of Naples’s pizza makes it sound unique and delicious. Does the "it" in the sentence above refer to the description or the pizza? Would it be better ...
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64 views

What is the right way to say “has recovered to within a threshold”?

Let's take the following sentence: X has recovered to within the maximum threshold of Y. What's really the right way to say this? Some ideas that come to mind are: to within the maximum ...
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43 views

Cracking your head to find OR Cracking your head over?

Which is the right way to say it? Got caught in a disagreement over this blog title. Example usage: Cracking your head to find the perfect Christmas gifts? Vs Cracking your head over the ...
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83 views

“for”as a preposition sometimes can be interchangeable with “because of”?

He deserves better academic environment for his dedication. First of all, is it correct to use "for" here in place of "because of" to indicate the reason? Also, are there any cases that "because ...
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111 views

“You can pick up the keys on/at the reception desk”

You can pick up the keys (on/at) the reception desk. The website where I'm learning English says it's at. But is it OK to use on here?
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79 views

Knocking 'at' vs. Knocking 'on' [closed]

Which is more natural and why: 'knocking on the door' or 'knocking at the door'? And which is grammatically correct?
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Use of preposition and prepositional adverb

I know that prepositions are not supposed to end a sentence; however, I have also read that some prepositions function as adverbs as seen in "come inside" and "run around". My question concerns an ...
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124 views

“Satisfied with” vs. “satisfied by” vs. “satisfied in”

He was satisfied with his test result. He was satisfied by his test result. He ws satisfied in his test result. Is there any difference between these?
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Prepositional Phrase with title

Since the prepositional phrase at the beginning of this sentence is more than five words, does it need this comma? Or can the comma be omitted? In “I’m Off to See Her,” I attempt to bring up the ...
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42 views

When is it right to use 'to' and 'through'? [closed]

What's the right way to say the sentence: I counted from one to ten. or I counted from one through ten. When are the respective prepositions used?
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256 views

Is it raining in/at/on Stephen's Green?

There is a park in Dublin called St Stephen's Green. Which prepositions of place would you use (and what context would you use them in) in the sentence "It's raining ... Stephen's Green"?
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680 views

Is “now” a “preposition”?

My question starts from this question which asks about difference between currently and right now, which is not that complicated. However, in the middle of exchanging comments, I found a few points ...
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1answer
123 views

What is the difference: in 10 minutes' time, in 10 minutes, after 10 minutes [duplicate]

For example, current time is 10:10. then when will the train leave? The train will leave in 10 minutes. The train will leave in 10 minutes' time. The train will leave after 10 minutes. If the ...
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54 views

Is “the instant you left” correct?

Given this sentence: Frankly, I was deeply offended the instant you left me. This web page covers the sentence the instant I heard it which is grammatically similar to the above sentence, ...
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58 views

“Twice in” ? can preposition be used after twice?

Which is the correct sentence: He goes to museum twice a week He goes to museum twice in a week
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65 views

Out or out of which is it? [duplicate]

Which is correct 1 Get out the house. Or 2 Get out of the house? I've heard that the American English standard is the first one and the British English standard is the second one. Is that true? The ...
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26 views

Unable to solve this exercise regarding prepositions

I have some questions regarding prepositions which I am unable to solve, any help is appreciated. I am not sure if this is the correct place to ask. In the following passage, fill in each numbered ...
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English and correct grammar usage [closed]

Bridge over the river or bridge on the river which is correct grammar usage
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143 views

Is “keep off” considered a phrasal verb, as in “keep off the grass”?

Or is "off" simply a preposition in this case? If it's a phrasal verb, would it still be considered so in the phrase: Keep your hands off her.
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90 views

offer for vs. offer to

Which of the two sentences is correct? He refused the organization's offer for help. He refused the organization's offer to help. Did a few searches online, and I found that both are widely used. ...
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82 views

Does a verb need to be preceded by “to”?

A (very) common verb is "to be", another is "to have". But you can also say that "have" is a common verb. The question is, when does a verb (on its own) have to be preceded by the preposition "to"? ...
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84 views

Is it “I'm new to NYC” or “I'm new in NYC”?

As the title suggests, can we say both are correct or if one of them is wrong? Which phrase is "wrong" and why? I'm new to NYC I'm new in NYC I'm not a native speaker but I tended to ...
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214 views

“in ink”or “with ink”

Which sentence is right : Write in ink. Write with ink. I studied that with a tool you use 'with' like: "cut with knife" etc. so should it be sentence no. 2 . But when I goggled 'in ink', I got ...
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143 views

Because as a preposition

Recently, I have seen discussions that state that "because" is always a preposition. Can someone shed light on this idea? Thank you. UPDATE: The question that prompted me to post this question: Is ...
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310 views

Why is “I go to work by my bicycle” wrong? [closed]

Why must I say I go to work every day with my red bicycle and not … by my red bicycle"? Shouldn't I use by in front of a means of transport? For example, the following sentence ...
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119 views

Is “which” a preposition? Because because

Backstory: Back in 2013 the American Dialect Society appointed because Word of the Year. People had begun using a new syntax: noun-phrases and adjectives could now follow because. In response Geoffrey ...
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159 views

Should I use “support of” or “support to” in this sentence?

"Heavy construction will furnish direct support [to/of] the company's real estate operations." Would "to" or "of" be proper?
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39 views

Preposition: evaluated on/at/as the borderline between?

The sentence goes: This resulted in my project being evaluated merely as "Sufficient", instead of (on/at/as) the borderline between "Great" and "Superb". So let's say that 80-90% would be "Great" and ...
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248 views

A word for knowing the truth but not wanting to believe it

What is the word for someone who knows someone else is lying but accepts it
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“The grades I have earned in/on/during my exchange semester”?

I guess the title explains my dilemma fully :) (perhaps it's important to note I'm writing an US English text). Thanks a lot!
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2answers
152 views

“None but the brave deserves the fair.” What part of speech is “but”?

In the sentence: None but the brave deserves the fair. ...is the word but here a: pronoun adverb preposition conjunction Normally but is used as conjunction, but here I am not sure if this ...
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54 views

“Wait for until” or “Wait until” [closed]

I encountered a gap-filling sentence like this: I'll wait __________ until you are ready. The answer in the book is "for". Does such a phrase exist? If it does, what is the difference between ...
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Over vs during - difference in whether it lasts up to the present? [closed]

I have read the following: we use over when something last up to the present /or future/ and we use during for a definite period of time. So is this wrong? I worked in the company IBM over the ...