Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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Is “and with” grammatical in this sentence?

We have registered nurses working on site with a nutritional background to provide weight loss advice to clients and with at least a 2 year working experience. Is the part in bold grammatical?
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58 views

Use of preposition 'to'

I hope to understand the use of the preposition to gerunds and the overall structure of the following sentence. Normally the use of to is to specify a destination or a purpose but here the way it is ...
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3answers
129 views

Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'? [duplicate]

Typically without is used to mean not having something. E.g. He went to work without his pants on. However, I'm wondering if it can be used for outside the bounds of. We do this with within. ...
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122 views

“In the mid of 1990s” Is it grammatically correct?

What is the correct way to write the following phrase? In the mid of 1990s What are the (writing) variants of that expression? (I just want to know, to diversify my writing.) Thank you.
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78 views

“Due to” vs. “owing to” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between due to and owing to? Are there some specific situations when owing to is to be used rather than due to?
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2answers
90 views

Use of 'in which …' to modify a noun

Consider the sentence Why did the Egyptians not develop sculpture in which the body turned and twisted through space like classical Greek statuary? Could someone please explain the use of "in ...
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2answers
83 views

Stay up-to-date “with” or “on”?

Suppose I want to say Stay up-to-date with/on technology news Do I use with or on?
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230 views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
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46 views

Can 'on' be used in a temporal setting?

I usually replace upon with on because it sounds less pompous. Is it correct to do so when the meaning is temporal? Consider Languages change (up)on contacting others. Should I replace upon with ...
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234 views

“Internship at” or “Internship in”?

Which one is correct in what case? I have found someone suggesting that you use "at" for organizations and "in" for fields or disciplines, e.g., I've got an internship at NATO, and he's got an ...
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55 views

Using prepositions and conjunctions in a sentence

Which one of the following example sentences are correct/more appropriate? It is better to laugh than cry. It is better to laugh than to cry. Some general tips would be helpful.
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88 views

Rephrasing “patient with suspected cancer” [closed]

Is it possible to form a sentence like A patient who is suspected for/with/?? cancer and if so, what is the correct preposition after suspect?
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3answers
377 views

“By when you want it completed” vs. “when you want it completed by”

Which of the following is grammatical? Can you please let me know by when you want it completed. Can you please let me know when you want it completed by. I am preferring the latter, but ...
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8answers
140 views

What is the difference between “fill” and “fill in”?

I am confused by fill and fill in. I checked online, and both forms are used in fill a hole fill in a hole So I am wondering is there any difference in meaning between them? If not, what's the ...
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3answers
879 views

“in a similar way as” or “in a similar way to”?

Consider the two statements: A is constructed in a similar way as B and A is constructed in a similar way to B Which one is correct, or can they both be? By the way, I originally thought of the ...
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4answers
86 views

Does one work in or on an aeroplane?

In an exam paper, there was a picture of an air stewardess in the aeroplane serving passengers. One of my pupils wrote the following: The air stewardess works on an aeroplane. Shouldn't it be ...
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1answer
29 views

Is there a difference between “introduction to” and “introduction into”?

“Introduction to” seems to be much more common than “introduction into”, but is the latter an acceptable alternative? If it is, is there some difference in meaning, tone, or connotations? I was ...
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24 views

“Calculations on/about the limiting behaviour”

I did some calculations ___ the limiting behaviour of some functions, when n tends to infinity. Is it about, on, or even something else?
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4answers
118 views

How do I define “by” versus “through” to my students?

Over the past five years, my high school students have stopped using "through" as a preposition and use "by" almost exclusively. For example, they might write, "they will do this by a detailed ...
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30 views

To start in or at a company?

I am not sure about what is right: I can start my career at an international company. or I can start my career in an international company. For me at sounds appropriate?
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135 views

Is “out” a preposition or an adverb in these sentences?

Is out a preposition or an adverb in these sentences? "We need to get the hell out of this place." "We need to get out and leave this place."
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50 views

“to” or “of” or both whilst referring to cities and places

I saw these billboards today: Turkey home of Istanbul Turkey home of Nemrut Nemrut is a mountain in Turkey with prehistoric monuments, and I think home of is the new slogan for Turkey. ...
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0answers
41 views

“of the” before adjectives [closed]

I am writing a technician text and oft have a sentence with a lot “OF THE” before adjectives like a: First example: This is a black spring OF THE new lock OF THE left door OF THE yellow car. Second ...
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49 views

What's the difference between 'working in/from' and 'working at' a coffee shop?

Does working at a coffee shop necessarily imply being employed there? Is working at a coffee shop never synonymous to working in/from the coffee shop?
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3answers
67 views

The wrong group to be “in” Or “on”?

'They either participate with some decorum, or recognise this is the wrong group to be on!' Is the above sentence idiomatically and grammatically correct? Can 'on' and 'in' be used in this ...
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32 views

“Weather in [place]” vs. “weather at [place]” [duplicate]

Which of the following is the better preposition? How is the weather in Bangalore? How is the weather at Bangalore?
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1answer
25 views

How to refer to a list?

I have a list containing some information and I need to refer to that list. Is a sentence "From the list above ... " ok? Example: item 1 item 2 item 3 From the list above is obvious there is a ...
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2answers
60 views

Which preposition to use with “forum”

I would hugely appreciate your help thinking through the tagline for a new online forum we are creating. The current version reads: A Forum on Our Economy, National Security and Sustainability. ...
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64 views

He flew like the wind [closed]

In the sentence He ran up the stairs up the stairs is a prepositional phrase functioning as an adverb to modify the verb ran, But what about the sentence He flew like the wind? Is like the wind ...
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2answers
87 views

“Witness to” vs. “witness of”

What is the difference in meaning between "a witness to" and "a witness for"? E.g., Then I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God... ...
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69 views

Necessity of “in” and “the”?

Please let me know which sentence is correct. I have faced the first and third one in the Longman dictionary, but dictionaries are prone to typos and errors. So I couldn't be sure which one is correct ...
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1answer
68 views

counselor attorney at law makes sense? [duplicate]

I find issue with the preposition "at."
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69 views

Cheque in your name or on your name?

I need to write something like I will make a cheque on/in your name What will be the appropriate preposition for the above sentence?
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42 views

“Happened to” or “Happened for”

If I am explaining and listing events that happened to someone or concern them in some way, should I say: This is a list of events that happened to person x. or This is a list of events ...
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63 views

sentence formation and use of preposition

how would we say "to transfer something in somebody's name" for e.g. in sentence i would "transfer the property paper in/to/on your name" Is there a better way. Thanks in anticipation
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Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
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233 views

using a preposition after verbs such as “enter” and “control”

consider the two sentence below: "Elizabeth Taylor entered the room" and "she entered into the room". here is another pair: "the rebels control the city" and "they control over the city". my ...
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27 views

“In a broad range of positions” or “on a broad range of positions”? [closed]

I'm writing a cover letter and need to know the proper way of saying this: Over the last ten years I had the opportunity to work for multinational companies in/on a broad range of management ...
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3answers
156 views

Having had someone DO or Having had someone TO DO?

I have read an older thread, presenting the following sentences: Having advised many of your colleagues (yet having had no one stand up for me when the shit hit the fan)... and Having ...
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28 views

level of detail between

The same level of detail between the 3D models and the real objects has been achieved. In formal language, does this sentence make sense? I'm not sure about the use of the preposition "between" ...
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2answers
50 views

Avoiding confusion with the word “before”

I wrote this sentence: I do not trust what has been written before me. Now, I was trying to use 'before' in the sense of 'prior to,' but just realized that 'before me' might also be taken to ...
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71 views

work 'at' the weekends or work 'during' the weekends? [closed]

I wrote "Many college students work at the weekends." My colleague changed 'at' to 'during' = Many college students work during the weekends. Do you feel there is a difference, however subtle?
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1answer
51 views

During the assembly of the Surveyor 3 probe, someone _sneezed_ a TV camera

Can someone sneeze a camera, or should they sneeze AT the camera? This is an extract from an IELTS practice test. Because the dictionary says "sneeze at smt", I had to put another word from the text, ...
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2answers
100 views

To or For? What's the rule? [closed]

As an ESL learner I always mess up using prepositions. It’s been especially difficult to understand when to use to or for. Are there any rules about this usage?
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52 views

Verbs within a prepostional phrase

In the following two sentences I see verbs being used within prepositional phrases. Is this acceptable in casual conversation? The meanings in both cases are clear. It depends on what the meaning ...
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6answers
143 views

“At schedule” vs. “by schedule” vs. “on schedule”

Let's assume that I wash my car every Saturday at noon. How do I say it using the word schedule: I wash my car at/by/on schedule. Update: It's not about doing something on a regular basis. It's ...
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96 views

Travel by my car or travel with my car? [closed]

What is the correct form of this question ? I travel by my car Vs I travel with my car ? Is it correct to say I drive to office in my car ?
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172 views

“on Mondays” v. “on Monday” with the adverb, “always”

Are all of these correct? I wash my car on Mondays. I always wash my car on Monday. I always wash my car on Mondays. I know #1 is correct, and it means every Monday. However, I'm not sure if #2 ...
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64 views

Do I use commas before the word “to” in the following sentence:

The JP-8 pipelines included 7.4 miles of parallel 10-inch pipelines from the Navy's transfer pump house manifold to the custody transfer to the Anderson Air Force Base.
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Use of preposition “with” after the word “marry”

Is it right to use the preposition "with" instead of "to" after the word "marry or married" under any given circumstances if we change the position of gender being mentioned? For example: "She is ...