Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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Preposition - “build by” or “build from”

I have a 'statement' and I build a package according to the statement. Which one is correct (for a function name (programing)) ? "build package by statement" "build package from statement"
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30 views

Difference in meaning between “the earth as viewed” and “the earth viewed”? [closed]

What is the exact difference in meaning between "the earth as viewed from a spaceship" and "the earth viewed from a spaceship" ?
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11 views

Is it correct to ommit “that” after the verb “to hope” in both written and spoken language? [duplicate]

I hope today is the beginning of another wonderful year? or I hope that today is the beginning of another wonderful year?
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3answers
88 views

A differ from B by/due to/for the presence of C? [closed]

My question is whether one should use "by", "due to", "for", or something else in a sentence like, for example: "Mineral water differs from distilled water by/due to/for the presence of minerals" or ...
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0answers
40 views

“As I used to” vs “Like I used to” [duplicate]

In sentences such as: We could go down to the fishing village, just ______ we used to. Is there a right or wrong preposition to use, between "as" and "like"? What would be the difference?
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1answer
35 views

“He's unsure what might come after” replacement?

I am not a native English speaker and according to my classes, the phrase "He's unsure what might come after" is incorrect because it ends in a preposition. Is there a replacement for this sentence or ...
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1answer
43 views

Difference in meaning between What will the weather be like? and What will the weather be?? [closed]

What is the exact difference in meaning between "What will the weather be like?" and "What will the weather be?" ?
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17 views

“at” or “with”--which is correct?

Which is correct---or are they both correct? I am angry at the boss. I am angry with the boss. I am upset at the boss. I am upset with the boss.
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1answer
60 views

Why the “of” in “The Lady of the shroud”?

In Bram Stoker's book "The lady of the shroud", why is the preposition "of" used instead of "in" like "lady in red", "lady in clothes"? What does the phrase mean exactly?
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1answer
36 views

scene to vs scene of

I am a non-native speaker wondering which of the following sentences would read more naturally to a native speaker: The market looked like it had been the scene of a mass murder. The market ...
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1answer
50 views

What is the time by/in your watch?

what is the time by/in your watch? (my book says by) the tired travelers are sitting in/under the shade of a banyan tree (book says in) I believe sentence 1 in should come sentence 2 under ...
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24 views

Does “the wind pushed it on with the others” mean?

does "the tiny seed is flying very low, but the wind pushed it on with the others" mean 1) "the tiny seed is flying very low and the others is flying high and the wind pushed the only tiny seed on." ...
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66 views

preposition + genitive vs non-genitive subjects + gerund

I was wondering which of the following phrases are correct? "without their having to learn" or "without them having to learn"? Any help is highly appreciated.
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1answer
53 views

Why would “to center around” be illogical? [duplicate]

I have seen the discussions of "to center on" vs "to center around", and usually the argument is that "to center X around Y" is illogical. The counter-argument is generally that it is an idiom and ...
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0answers
24 views

Difference in meaning between “taking it out on you” and “taking it out you”?

What is the difference in meaning between "taking it out on you" and "taking it out you" in the sentence "You’re stuffing the wrong things into your stomach, and your stomach is taking it out on you" ?...
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69 views

What is the correct preposition: on or in?

Is it “on WhatsApp” or “in WhatsApp”? Like, “text on WhatsApp” or “text in WhatsApp”? Please, can anyone clear up this doubt of mine. P.S I know it's on in case of Facebook but is it on for ...
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0answers
50 views

manufacturing process vs process for manufacturing

Question: Is it idiomatic to say "a manufacturing process of/for a high-precision lens" in place of "a process for manufacturing a high-precision lens"? In connection with this question, I've ...
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1answer
28 views

Send and receive stuff? What to use in receiving in-from or in-to

hope you can help me. I am not sure what should I use (or what is actually correct to use). I want to say that "I am sending stuff from one place to another" and at the same time "I am receiving ...
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0answers
31 views

Which sentence is more appropriate grammatically?

I was typing an e-mail. The confusion is between preposition "enroll in" and "enroll at". In which sentence has this preposition "enroll" been used correctly? I have enrolled in a university. I ...
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45 views

pay attention at + gerund

Is this sentence correct, in regards to the use of pay attention "at" instead of pay attention "to"? They should pay more attention at identifying and rewarding skilled resources and talent, by ...
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0answers
40 views

What is the appropriate preposition of “Radio programme”?

So, in this sentence I listened to this conversation (On - In) a radio programme. What is the appropriate preposition to use?
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0answers
36 views

“On fire” versus “in flames”, “on parole” but “in prison” [duplicate]

A house can be 'on fire' or 'in flames'. They can be used interchangeably, but there seems to be a difference of involvement - 'in flames' suggests the house is engulfed by fire, 'on fire' could mean ...
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1answer
31 views

The use of 'sort in' vs 'sort to' in programming

In computer science, I have seen that people say that we can use an algorithm to 'sort in' ascending order. Shouldn't it be 'sort to' ascending order? Any help understanding the correct usage would be ...
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23 views

Preposition at the end of a question

Are the prepositions at the end of these sentences necessary? And why/why not? Where are you at? Where did it originate from? Where did you come from?
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1answer
56 views

Why do we say on the team and not in the team? [duplicate]

What is it about the word "team" that makes it uniquely take the preposition "on" ? And yet, the word "club" is similar in meaning; and we can be in a club.
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8answers
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“On” hard drive versus “in” memory

Why do American English speakers typically say something is "on the hard drive" when referring to data stored with a hard drive (or other permanent storage device) but when referring to something ...
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18 views

Preposition choice adjectives

What's the right sentence ? People were embarrassed OF the result of their team who played badly or People were embarrassed BY the result of their team who played badly ? Thank you so much
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1answer
72 views

Prepositions with the verb “ask”: “ask questions from,” “ask a question to”

"What questions do they ask a communication trainer?" or "What questions do they ask from a communication trainer?" Also, I know "She asked me a question" is what's generally used but just have a ...
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32 views

Usage of the word “as”

Is it okay to use a single "as" in a sentence? "Before, the government would always intervene. Now, it isn't as involved." Or should I say: "In the past, the government would always intervene. Now, ...
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1answer
38 views

Omitting the word “for”

Is there a difference in meaning between these two? Services must be paid. Services must be paid for.
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3answers
45 views

Will prepositional verbs always prevent us from moving the preposition to the middle of a sentence?

I'm bringing this question because I'm not sure whether a preposition in the end of a sentence can be moved to the middle, especially considering prepositional verbs. Also, I'd like to know which ...
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2answers
29 views

Omitting the word “to”

Will omitting "to" change the meaning of these sentences? Luffy, name one mall you've been to. In the places you've been to, did you see any dragon balls?
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10answers
318 views

Speaker Paul Ryan said “encouraged with” but media is saying “Ryan encouraged by”. Why?

*Note: The first half of this question, in bold, is streamlined and expresses the gist of my message. You can skip the second half of the question if you would rather not slog through all my ...
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2answers
118 views

How about Sunday vs How about on Sunday?

"How about" are followed by nouns, clauses or Verb+ing. But is it grammatically correct to say "How about on Sunday?" I got more results Googling "How about on Sunday?" than "How about Sunday?" Which ...
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2answers
42 views

Up vs Right up - What's the difference?

For example, it is the second more emphatic or just more words(unnecessary): She went up to the door She went right up to the door
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1answer
52 views

“In contrast with” or “In contrast to” (or something else)?

In my writing I often like to make a comparison between two things. However, I'm not sure how I should start my sentence and if it's even a good idea to start it this way. Example: React has a ...
2
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1answer
68 views

precondition + for / of / to - what's the difference?

This is my first post ever on this valuable forum! I'm at a loss, since I'm supposed correct students' exams, and I started doubting the grammar book's normatively exclusive use of the combination ...
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1answer
60 views

Starting and ending with prepositions

Is the usage of in and into in the adverb phrase redundant? "In every competition that you get into, you have to do your best." I know that it would be better to just say "In every competition, you ...
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19 views

In and Out : Differently uses prepositions

Why does "out" take a preposition while "in" doesn't? Like in: I'm out of this game and I'm in this game
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31 views

IN problem solving vs ON problem solving [closed]

I want to know the right use of IN vs ON in the sentence below. IN problem solving vs ON problem solving
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1answer
57 views

“I went to the cinema after eating my dinner” - is “after” a preposition or subordinating conjunction?

English schools are introducing some assessment tests for all children. Some people are unhappy with this. A politician was interviewed on the radio about it, and was asked one of the questions. (...
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25 views

By option? Per option?

When we try to decide which item to buy, we measure each potential selection against the criteria most important to us (quality, cost, etc), and choose the option that most accurately meets our needs. ...
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24 views

On or upon execution?

To be specific, I want to write something like: "Afterwards, on execution of the script, the solver is compiled and new dependency list files are generated." or "Afterwards, upon execution ...
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2answers
50 views

Is “commute to” acceptable? [closed]

Is it acceptable to say "I commute to San Francisco every morning" or is there the "to" a problem there?
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1answer
33 views

Using the preposition ON in phrase“ She shall receive % annually on the sum”

In legal Document there is a following phrase: " She shall receive % annually on the sum" 11 lawyers who read this document divided how to read it. 6 lawyers read it as she have to get SUM + % ...
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1answer
35 views

agree on that clause?

I wrote this sentence one day. "I agree with the author on that the structure of the poem is unusual." I read it again and found it a little strange. I knew that that-clauses cannot be used after a ...
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1answer
27 views

Which of these is grammatically correct? [closed]

"Stop smoking until it's too late" Or "Stop smoking before it's too late"
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2answers
29 views

contemptuous of vs contemptuous to

Which of the following sentences is grammatically right? I am contemptuous of my History teacher. I am contemptuous to my History teacher.
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3answers
57 views

Which of these is most correct, and why? [closed]

He called me over FaceTime He called me by Facetime. He called me through FaceTime. He called me via FaceTime. He called me with FaceTime. FaceTime = A calling service from Apple.
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2answers
174 views

How to correctly apply “in which”, “of which”, “at which”, “to which”, etc? [closed]

How does one correctly apply "in which", "of which", "at which", "to which", etc? I'm confused with which one to apply when constructing sentences around these. Please help me out here.