Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

-2
votes
2answers
47 views

awareness of or awareness for something? [closed]

This program was initiated to increase the awareness for breast cancer. does this seem correct? or the preposition 'for' be replaced with 'of'?
0
votes
1answer
42 views

The use of “except” [closed]

Here is a sentence I saw using the word except: valid claims were granted patent to land free and clear, except for a small registration fee. What does it mean? How does the word except here ...
2
votes
0answers
40 views

“Provide you with something” vs “Provide you something”? [duplicate]

I have a sentence that reads: "To provide you the best possible service..." I'm being asked to add the word with so that it reads "To provide you with the best possible service..." Is there a rule ...
1
vote
3answers
89 views

What does “over” mean here?

"All assets could be pledged except for pledges over a going concern (gages sur fonds de commerce), Luxembourg law doesn't provide for an all assets security." Could someone explain this sentence? ...
-1
votes
1answer
41 views

Is “help out” an inappropriate phrase? [closed]

I have seen statements like: She helped out her grandmother. OR The boy was helping out in the laundry. But, does it make any sense to have the “out” there? Is it even incorrect, in spite ...
0
votes
2answers
50 views

Which preposition to use with “social media”?

I have this sentence, and I'm not sure which preposition is best to use with social media. Teens take videos and post them through social media. Should it be-- through social media? to social ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

What preposition should be used with “cache”?

Which is most grammatical? It's still cached to your phone. It's still cached in your phone. It's still cached on your phone. I find myself gravitating towards "to" but I'm not sure - ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

Question about prepositions/conjunctions (from, to…)

Can you please tell which (if any) of the following is correct? Where are you coming from?/From where are you coming? Who will you give it to?/To whom will you give it? What for?/For ...
-1
votes
1answer
38 views

Prepositions used with “different”? [duplicate]

I apologize if this question has been asked before; I couldn't find it in a site search. I have this sentence about teaching children safety rules: The rules are different when you are together with ...
0
votes
2answers
34 views

what to use with “your address”, at or on? [closed]

what should we use with the word "your home", at or on? for example- I have placed an order .... your address thanks in advance
0
votes
2answers
52 views

“Blinds us to” or “blinds us from”?

I see these phrases sometimes: "blinds us from" and "blinds us to". Which form is correct? The whole sentence would be something like "blinds us from the truth".
1
vote
1answer
145 views

“over the period of” or “over the period”?

Which one is correct? I visited four countries over the period of 2010 to 2014. or I visited four countries over the period 2010 to 2014.
1
vote
2answers
72 views

“On the principle” versus “Under the principle”

Is there a significant difference between the two? As far as I can tell, they seem to be used interchangeably.
2
votes
4answers
143 views

What preposition should I use with “flying”?

I want to say that I loved flying, but I also want to add the name of the airline company in my sentence. So, what should I say? I loved flying with American Airlines or I loved flying on ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

“obstacle to developing '” vs “obstacle in developing”?

Which proposition are used after obstacle? I have seen both "in" and "to". what are the difference between them? for example, what is the difference between the following sentences/ There is an ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

What does it mean “off one's look”

I've come across the following passage in a script. PERSON 1: And tomatoes are actually berries! The others look at him with annoyed confusion. PERSON 1: (off their looks) What? It’s ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
3
votes
3answers
64 views

Is this statement grammatically correct - “I have spent too long confusing nice for good”

My confusion is whether the right way of writing this would be "confused X with Y" or "confused X for Y"
0
votes
2answers
63 views

'in search for/of true love?'

I need to update my fb status: in search for true love or in search of true love Which one is grammatically correct ?
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
5
votes
2answers
148 views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
0
votes
3answers
76 views

What does “match X against Y” mean?

I just read a post that says: When Angular bootstraps your application, the HTML compiler traverses the DOM matching directives against the DOM elements. What does "match... against" mean? How ...
-1
votes
2answers
51 views

Concurrently with or Sequentially To/Sequentially With?

Drug A is administered concurrently with or sequentially to Drug B. I want to say in a formal manner that Drug A and Drug B are administered either at the same time or at different times, but I ...
1
vote
2answers
87 views

On vs At with date and time

This must be a simple question for a native speaker. I know that we use "on" with dates: I'll see you on January 1st. And we use "at" with times: I'll see you at 17:30. But what preposition has to ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

“On the equivalence of A and B” or “between A and B”

I am writing an academic paper with a choice of titles: On the equivalence of A and B On the equivalence between A and B or On the equivalence of A, B and C On the equivalence ...
1
vote
3answers
44 views

Tolerance for or to

Which is the correct statement: adopt zero tolerance "for" or "to" discrimination in the workplace?
1
vote
3answers
100 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
-1
votes
2answers
81 views

Can I use “contend” without a preposition?

On the one hand, recent advances in the power of computers have been decried as the nemesis of whatever vestiges of our privacy still survive. On the other, the Internet is acclaimed as a Utopia. ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

“onto” versus “on to”

Should the single word onto or the two words on to be used here? She held onto the cushion instead of holding onto the metal frame. She was grabbing onto the seat cushion. There's nothing ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

Can a noun be supported by 2 prepositions?

See this sentence: Partner A will have a contract with our company with following missions:... It can be written into two separate sentences: Partner A will have a contract with our ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

What's the right preposition to use with the verb “enroll”?

The dictionary says that one enrolls in a university, but today I heard a person saying "The student enrolled at the school." Is it right? Can I use both the prepositions "in" and "at"?
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Is “available for the world” OK? [duplicate]

I've just put a new web page live, and now one of my sentences is bugging me. The sentence in question is: It was developed internally and made available for the world. The part that I'm not ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Is one of them wrong? “Working at a new job” vs. “Working in a new job” [duplicate]

Can "at" and "in" be used interchangeably without worry or is one of them specifically wrong especially in the case of: Working at a new job vs. Working in a new job? and Living in a new apartment ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

“for + noun phrase” vs “of + noun phrase”

presumptive (adj) 1.1 Law Giving grounds for the inference of a fact or of the appropriate interpretation of the law. Would someone please explain why of precedes the second noun phrase (the ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Which preposition to use in “lack of knowledge __ the manager”

The preposition by is faulty in this sentence but I don't know which preposition I have to replace it with. The inaccurate planning is caused by the lack or insufficient presence of relevant ...
4
votes
2answers
118 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
1
vote
1answer
100 views

Use “of” or “for” with Institute, Department, Office…?

When should which be used and what's the difference? Department of XYZ or Department for XYZ Institute of ABC or Institute for ABC Federal Office of... or Federal Office for... Is there any sort ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

'Off of' versus 'from' [duplicate]

Is 'off of' ever a valid substitution for 'from'? For example, 'It's that guy off of Friends.' Would it ever be acceptable to use this construction in formal written English? I live in the ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

Should the preposition 'by' be used before all the gerunds if there are more than one? [duplicate]

Is this grammatically and syntactically correct? … by a) studying and b) helping – or should it be: … a) by studying and b) by helping
0
votes
2answers
86 views

What's the grammatical object of “at” in “at 2-0 down”?

At 2-0 down with ten minutes left, you have to go for broke. This is a structure at odds with what most learners know. Prepositions take nominals as objects, but here, what's the supposed object ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Clauses ending with prepositions [duplicate]

I often hear the rule, "Don't end a sentence with a preposition." As long as we ignore the prepositions in phrasal verbs, it makes sense that an object should follow a preposition. By the same logic, ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

“before/after that” as a preposition

In some older English texts I have stumbled on phrases where the word "that" is used as part of a preposition. Here are some examples from the KJV Bible: Deuteronomy 9:4 Speak not thou in thine ...
2
votes
2answers
192 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
1
vote
4answers
110 views

To climb (in) the rankings?

When competing in a contest, is your goal: To climb the rankings or To climb in the rankings ?
0
votes
2answers
293 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
0
votes
3answers
62 views

Which preposition is used with tolerance in this sentence?

I want to use the word tolerance in the context of infectious diseases. This sentence: The immune response will mediate either clearance or tolerance preposition infections. In other words, ...
-1
votes
3answers
35 views

Usage of “Between” [closed]

Mr. Rao will meet the candidates who cleared the test between 9.00 AM ____ 3:00 PM. What is more appropriate here? to/and/till/upto? Also can you brief upon the usage of "between"?
2
votes
2answers
62 views

“On/over the phone” [closed]

Which version is correct? As discussed with you over the phone. As discussed with you on the phone.
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Preposition with 'line' when quoting from a text (prose or poetry) with numbered lines? [duplicate]

When referring to a line or lines in/from (?) a text with numbered lines, is it "the idea expressed in line 25 is such and such"; "in line 25, the word 'lisp' is a clear indication that…" or "the ...
1
vote
1answer
34 views

“is to” or “is how to”?

Is it better to say "is to" or "is how to"? For example: A challenging problem is to analyse the runtime effects. or should it be: A challenging problem is how to analyse the runtime ...