1
vote
1answer
41 views

“Knowledgeable about” vs. “knowledgeable on” vs. “knowledgeable in”

When should I use each of the collocations "knowledgeable about", "knowledgeable on", and "knowledgeable in"?
0
votes
1answer
42 views

“Habitat selection in/of birds”, “concept in/of statistics”, “theme in/of evolution”

It seems to me that in and of work equally well in sentences such as these: Habitat selection in birds is frequently studied. Habitat selection of birds is frequently studied. ...
-1
votes
0answers
35 views

Do you buy “in”, “by”, “at” or “on” a website"? [duplicate]

If test.com is my website name, which one is correct: In test.com you can buy biscuits By test.com you can buy biscuits How can I explain to someone that if you register on my site you can do ...
0
votes
1answer
147 views

“I'm sorry for” vs. “I'm sorry about”

Can I use about and for interchangeably? If not, when should I use either? Which is more common? I'm sorry for/about yesterday. I'm sorry for/about my bad English. I'm sorry for/about that. ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

“in” versus “of”

I hope that both forms shown below are correct. What is the difference between them and which one seems more natural? the initial and final element in the expression/clause the initial and ...
1
vote
2answers
54 views

Is it “on behalf of” or “in behalf of”?

I often hear folks say in behalf of instead of on behalf of, which sets my teeth on edge. Which preposition is correct here, in or on?
2
votes
5answers
130 views

“Share me” or “Share with me”?

I heard people saying: Can you please share me the slides? or Can you share me the note, etc.? I think it should be: Can you please share the slides with me? or Can you share ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

“At the service of” versus “in the service of”

In doing a translation on duolingo, another translator had translated a phrase to say "at the service of X". I edited this to "in the service of X" and left a comment that as a native speaker, hearing ...
4
votes
2answers
481 views

“Prices of” vs “prices for”

I came across two different sentences, from The Wall Street Journal, both containing the word "prices" but with different prepositions, "of" and "for". Here are the two sentences. Audi Cuts ...
1
vote
2answers
83 views

“On the principle” versus “Under the principle”

Is there a significant difference between the two? As far as I can tell, they seem to be used interchangeably.
1
vote
1answer
250 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
1
vote
2answers
53 views

Different from x Different to x Different than [duplicate]

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Is “available for the world” OK? [duplicate]

I've just put a new web page live, and now one of my sentences is bugging me. The sentence in question is: It was developed internally and made available for the world. The part that I'm not ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
1
vote
3answers
127 views

Is a movie played in a theater or at a theater?

Do we say a movie is being played in a theater or at a theater?
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
0
votes
1answer
87 views

“Due to” vs. “owing to” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between due to and owing to? Are there some specific situations when owing to is to be used rather than due to?
2
votes
3answers
2k views

“in a similar way as” or “in a similar way to”?

Consider the two statements: A is constructed in a similar way as B and A is constructed in a similar way to B Which one is correct, or can they both be? By the way, I originally thought of the ...
1
vote
4answers
94 views

Does one work in or on an aeroplane?

In an exam paper, there was a picture of an air stewardess in the aeroplane serving passengers. One of my pupils wrote the following: The air stewardess works on an aeroplane. Shouldn't it be ...
0
votes
2answers
25 views

“Calculations on/about the limiting behaviour”

I did some calculations ___ the limiting behaviour of some functions, when n tends to infinity. Is it about, on, or even something else?
0
votes
0answers
39 views

“Weather in [place]” vs. “weather at [place]” [duplicate]

Which of the following is the better preposition? How is the weather in Bangalore? How is the weather at Bangalore?
0
votes
2answers
100 views

“Witness to” vs. “witness of”

What is the difference in meaning between "a witness to" and "a witness for"? E.g., Then I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God... ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Cheque in your name or on your name?

I need to write something like I will make a cheque on/in your name What will be the appropriate preposition for the above sentence?
0
votes
1answer
121 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
0
votes
1answer
28 views

“In a broad range of positions” or “on a broad range of positions”? [closed]

I'm writing a cover letter and need to know the proper way of saying this: Over the last ten years I had the opportunity to work for multinational companies in/on a broad range of management ...
0
votes
6answers
155 views

“At schedule” vs. “by schedule” vs. “on schedule”

Let's assume that I wash my car every Saturday at noon. How do I say it using the word schedule: I wash my car at/by/on schedule. Update: It's not about doing something on a regular basis. It's ...
2
votes
2answers
286 views

“As of this morning” vs. “as at this morning”

As of this morning, he was not in support of the motion. As at this morning, he was not in support of the motion. Which is correct?
7
votes
1answer
185 views

What colour eyes

I've just stumbled on this sentence What colour eyes does she have? in my grammar book. What got me interested in this is the combination of the words colour, eyes with what and without any ...
0
votes
1answer
82 views

Are “in” and “at” the same in some situations? [duplicate]

If someone calls me, and I say I can't talk to them at the moment, because I'm at school, is there any difference between the following two sentences? I'm at school. I'm in school. Do ...
0
votes
1answer
96 views

What preposition does “rate … criteria” take?

I'm writing up specs for a website with learning materials for our alpha testers to comment on. Among others, I'm describing the rating system: the materials can be rated (...) several criteria (such ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Why do we say “the Indians were put on reservations” and not “in reservations”

The preposition "on" is used to refer to a surface like "on the floor" or "on the ceiling" "in" is used to refer as a enclosed space like "in a country" or "in a city". Why do we say "the Indians ...
2
votes
1answer
534 views

“Open to opportunities” vs. “open for opportunities”

I want to know which sentence is correct and why: I'm open to new opportunities. I'm open for new opportunities.
0
votes
2answers
253 views

“At this section…” vs. “in this section…”

At/in this section, you must enter your shipping details. Should I use at or in?
0
votes
1answer
71 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

“at event” vs. “on event”

What is a better preposition for the word "event"? at on Specifically I want to say: Lector at an event Lector on an event Which is the correct one?
1
vote
2answers
166 views

'quoted to you' or 'quoted for you'?

Which is correct? The price we quoted for you or The price we quoted to you I often stumble with this. I'm not sure how to use for you and to you.
0
votes
2answers
155 views

How to correctly use 'whereupon'?

How to use 'whereupon'? I'm making sense of it in the following example by taking 'whereupon' to mean 'which at'. 'This Is Jinsy is one of those weird British comedies, like The League of Gentleman ...
0
votes
1answer
110 views

Is the “by” correct in “makes no claims by writing them”?

Is it correct to use the preposition "by" in such a context: If within this period Mr X makes no claims on the work quality by writing them in the certificate, then ... I meant that Mr X can ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

“Deliver using/with/by the certificate”

In the fragment "to complete and deliver construction works to the customer using the Certificate of Work Completion", how can I change the word using (in the sense of "by what means")? Should I ...
0
votes
1answer
270 views

“Fall from” vs. “fall off”

Which of the following sentences is correct? She fell from the bike. She fell off the bike.
1
vote
1answer
867 views

Which is correct — “email me [on/at] x@y.com”? [duplicate]

Which variant is the correct one: email me on xxx@xxx.com email me at xxx@xxx.com email me to xxx@xxx.com Or should another preposition go there?
0
votes
3answers
132 views

Which preposition comes in the phrase “assistant professor in English” [duplicate]

Which preposition should I use in the sentence "He is an assistant professor in English" or should i use "He is an assistant professor of English"?
0
votes
1answer
68 views

“Facility for speaking” vs. “facility to speak”

Which one would you use: I lost my facility to speak. I lost my facility for speaking. Or does either work?
0
votes
2answers
768 views

in or on the following business Day

I have been trying to find a quick answer of this, but my google searches didn't get me anywhere. I'm confused about using in or on in the following sentence. We will return your call in the ...
2
votes
2answers
203 views

I work “in a grocery store” or “at a grocery store” [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker but both sounds good to me. Which one should be more accurate or in fact correct.
0
votes
1answer
95 views

Should I say “to your daily life” or “in your daily life”?

As you grow up, you realize your philosophical views don't apply much to/in your daily life. Which option is more grammatically correct?
1
vote
4answers
409 views

“In” vs. “of” after the superlative form of adjectives

Hanna's the youngest member of the team. Why isn't it "in the team"? The rule that we covered in out textbook New Total English pre-intermediate says that we use in with groups of people and ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Does an object have “specificity to” or “specificity for” another object?

Does an object possess specificity to or for another object? Every time I go to express this concept in writing, I struggle over which preposition is the more appropriate and more precise. This is ...
0
votes
3answers
976 views

Using three examples with “range from”

When using range from with two examples, it could be: I should note that our current users range from juniors to graduates. But when using three examples: I should note that our current ...
0
votes
2answers
631 views

Is it correct and natural to respond with “interested in” in this context?

I was told: Glad to come across someone who knows Theology. My (proposed) response: It's my pleasure to find someone else interested in Theology on the other side of the World. I am ...