0
votes
2answers
94 views

“Martyr To” vs “Martyr For”

This book specifies the difference as: martyr for something: smb. who is made to suffer severely for a cause martyr to something: smb. who is acutely inflicted by something Oxford ...
2
votes
4answers
320 views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
2
votes
2answers
138 views

Which is more grammatically correct - “performance in” or “performance on”?

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? a. John's performance on the test shocked the teacher. (or) b. John's performance in the test shocked the teacher.
0
votes
1answer
267 views

How to use “until now/so far” in the past tenses?

I know that "until now" indicates that something changed. No messages have come until now. Now the first message arrived. But what about using it in the past, for example in reported speech or ...
7
votes
2answers
563 views

“Let's get it over (with)” — do I need the “with”?

I'm trying to understand why there is this "with". I can say "Let's get this done". So, why "Let's get this over with?" I would really appreciate if someone could explain that a bit.
2
votes
1answer
597 views

a good job (of / in / at) doing something

Are the following sentences correct? If so, which is the most common? 1) You did a good job raising your children. 2) You did a good job of raising your children. 3) You did a good job in ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Ambiguity about passive in my textbook

In my textbook, it said "In an active sentence we need to include the agent as subject; using a passive allows us to omit the agent by leaving out the prepositional phrase with by" Ex: ...
0
votes
2answers
71 views

Difference between 'retreated into' and 'retreated back into'

What is the difference between retreated into and retreated back into? They retreated into Pakistan
0
votes
2answers
159 views

Is that right to say “For the first time we show…”

In a PhD thesis, I would like to express that I am the first one who has proved the result. Is it right to say "For the first time we show..."?
2
votes
2answers
444 views

Is it “moved into” or “moved in to”?

I suppose I am confused in general about the use of "into" versus "in to." For this case, though, consider the sentence, "I moved into my apartment today" as opposed to "I moved in to my apartment ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“Split in half” vs. “split in two” — which one is correct?

Does the "in" imply multiplication, in which case split in half is correct, or is it division? It sounds like the latter to me, but I've heard it used both ways.
2
votes
2answers
335 views

“taste for” vs. “taste in”

What is the correct usage of 'taste for' and 'taste in'? You have a good taste for music You have a good taste in music. Your taste for books is pathetic
3
votes
2answers
125 views

Can “in” be replaced by “with”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Covered with” vs “covered in” vs “covered by” From J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (June 1997): He bent down and pulled his wand out of the ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

“Ignored for deletion” [closed]

Is the phrase "item is ignored for deletion" grammatical and idiomatic? The context is a software program. I have a list of items to be deleted from a database, and if an item from the list is not ...
4
votes
1answer
2k views

“For no other reason than” vs. “for no other reason that” vs. “for no other reason than that”

I am looking for a comprehensive analysis of these three constructions: ... for no other reason than X. ... for no other reason that X. ... for no other reason than that X. Which is ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Is “project in hand” correct?

I am writing my MSc project report in English and I want to use the phrase "the project in hand" as a title to a chapter where I will be introducing the project that was undertaken. Is such an ...
3
votes
3answers
141 views

Meaning of “work better for silence”

Holmes and Watson are alone in the room. Holmes: I shall work better for silence. Watson: Oh, well. I dare say I can find something quiet to do. Does he mean he needs silence to work? And ...
2
votes
2answers
11k views

Burst in or into laughter?

Which of the following phrases is correct grammatically? burst in laughter burst into laughter Or are they both correct (this is my guess)? I'd think that to "burst in laughter" could ...
6
votes
2answers
15k views

“Convenient for you” vs “convenient to you”

Is there a difference between "convenient for you" and "convenient to you"? And if it is, could you explain it?
5
votes
4answers
414 views

How should I understand “a hundred years on” in this sentence?

I learned the following sentence from The Economist. A hundred years on, superconductors have found widespread use in just one technology, magnetic resonace imaging, which lets doctors peer ...
3
votes
2answers
10k views

“On short notice” vs “At short notice”

What's the difference between those two? I've tried to ask Google but got very mixed results -- some people say it's the same, some that one of them is illegal and the rest offer other explanation, ...
4
votes
3answers
364 views

“Agreed” or “agreed to”

Should agreed or agreed to be used in the example below? The member countries agreed the bailout package for the sovereign. NATO will enforce the sanctions agreed in May. The member ...
4
votes
3answers
33k views

Does the phrase “who's in?” or “I'm in!” exist in (informal) English?

I really think I've heard it in some American sitcom/sitcoms, meaning something like participating in. "I want to play football. Who's in?" — "Great idea, I'm in!" Does it really exist, or am I wrong? ...
1
vote
1answer
218 views

“Is it in slang?” versus “is it slang?”

What is more correct and why? I heard few British people speaking "in slang" and some of them said that unofficial language is named "slang." Additionally, is "slang" official/polite word?
8
votes
1answer
846 views

“How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”

Quite a few phrases in English are constructed like so: How [adjective] a [noun]...? This is the question form of the construction, which is often answered with the negative: Not that ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

Why is it “wide *of* the mark” instead of “wide *off* the mark”?

One says that something is "off the mark". For instance, an opinion or comment. But when it is way off, why is it "wide of the mark" instead of "wide off the mark"?
1
vote
3answers
9k views

Is it OK when I say “I have a little request from you”? Is it commonly used?

Is it OK when I say "I have a little request from you"? Is it commonly used?
5
votes
3answers
693 views

Up or down a notch?

(I apologize for the silly question ahead) I've lost some weight recently, and I was able, for the first time today, to close my belt buckle using a notch higher than usual... For the life of me I ...
3
votes
2answers
7k views

Classify into 4 categories or in 4 categories?

Which is more correct? I am going to classify these faults into 4 categories. I am going to classify these faults in 4 categories. I am going to classify these faults as 4 categories. ...
1
vote
3answers
4k views

“Which we discussed” vs. “about which we discussed”

Which one is correct? I’ve added changes/fixes which we discussed yesterday. or I’ve added changes/fixes about which we discussed yesterday.
3
votes
1answer
2k views

“that of which you” vs “that which you”

What is the differentiator between these two phrases?