1
vote
1answer
37 views

Why is there an “in” in “she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government”?

I just don't know why there's an in in the following sentence: If she succeeds, she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government. Taken from this CNN story. Why must there ...
0
votes
2answers
312 views

'In order to' or 'to'

Which sentence is correct and why? What is the difference in meaning? I have already written to you, and I received your reply to submit my documents. I have already written to you, and I ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

What is the meaning of “on” in this sentence? [closed]

I saw this sentence "I go on a picnic." What is the meaning of "on" in this sentence.
3
votes
3answers
116 views

“covered by” vs. “covered with”

I found this sentence in some book: Imagine a young child who already knows that creatures that live in water are fish, they have gills, and their skin is covered by scales. Saying “their skin ...
-1
votes
1answer
234 views

implement something for/in/on/with something?

Which preposition is correct to use in the following sentence?: Implementation of this technique for/in/on/with complex objects is complicated (meaning: it is complicated to apply this technique ...
1
vote
1answer
545 views

What's the difference between “made from” and “made of” [duplicate]

What's the difference between "made from" and "made of"? Could anyone give me some examples?
1
vote
1answer
68 views

The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
0
votes
3answers
160 views

“During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company” — does it mean that 1988 was included?

I am an ESL student and I wonder what the following sentence means. During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company Does it mean that 1988 was included? I am not quite sure about the meaning ...
0
votes
3answers
109 views

“Skyscrapers are of various shapes” vs. “skyscrapers are various shapes”

Skyscrapers are of various shapes. Skyscrapers are various shapes. Why do we use of in the sentence above? Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?
1
vote
4answers
3k views

Use of “I for one” [closed]

When we say “for one” in a sentence, what does it mean? I heard a sentence in a TV program where Robin Hood said: Who will bear this injustice? I, for one, will not. As I understand it, “I ...
1
vote
2answers
179 views

How to use the word 'contrary'?

Is it right to say contrary to our interest to reduce the size of the paper I want to say that we want to reduce the size of the paper but we cannot do it, due to specific reasons.
0
votes
2answers
1k views

“Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?

Which of the following sentences is correct? We are glad to provide a recommendation of a good work you did. We are glad to provide a recommendation for a good work you did.
0
votes
6answers
421 views

What does “gut over” mean?

What does "gutted over" mean in Javad Zarif's recent tweet? Mr.Secretary, was it Iran that gutted over half of US draft Thursday night? and publicly commented against it Friday morning?
0
votes
2answers
82 views

Apply to a university to study/for studying..?

I'm writing my CV and do not know how to correctly say that: * After I graduated from X (//X is a high school), I applied to a university to study chemistry and also computer systems. * I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
95 views

Emphasis is put on relation of A and B, instead of/on

Having the following sentence, I'm not sure how to use prepositions after 'instead': The emphasis is put on the relation between A and B, instead of on A and B themselves. Is "instead of on" ...
1
vote
1answer
96 views

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.”

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.” Is that correct? Why there is "FOR", would it not work simply with "WHEN"? “it would not be fair to everyone else ...
3
votes
3answers
107 views

Does “a value between two values” imply the two values are included within the range?

For example, if a there is a validation message that specifies that a number "must be a value between 1 and 100" does that imply that 1 and 100 are part of the allowed set of values? I would suggest ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

“In extensive grounds” vs. “on extensive grounds”

If there is a large house, can I say either of the following? The house stands in extensive grounds. The house stands on extensive grounds. Which one makes sense?
1
vote
4answers
74 views

“Tune to <something>” - does it make sense?

I am wondering if saying "tune to this music" would make sense? Guitars can be tuned to particular note, can people tune to song, or music, or idea? Google doesn't return many results for "tune to" ...
-1
votes
1answer
503 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

“Absorbed in” vs. “absorbed with”

That young man was absorbed in his big camera. He was shooting a short movie of people and passers by who were singing and reading the poems under the trees. If I use with instead of in, does it ...
0
votes
1answer
77 views

“Developed by” vs “Developed at”

Normally I see things written this way : Developed by Joe Doe But I have also seen instances where it says: Developed by Company Inc. Now, I know it doesn't make sense to say: ...
1
vote
2answers
182 views

“Holding her finger” vs “holding on her finger” vs “holding onto her finger.”

Mary peered down at the beach, and holding her index finger, she sank back to her seat with a sigh. Mary peered down at the beach, and holding on her index finger, she sank back to her seat ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

When is between inclusive and when exclusive?

It seems that the exact meaning of between is very tied to its specific usage. What should I assume in a general situation about the inclusivity of between. Consider: "Pick a number between 1 and ...
2
votes
1answer
766 views

“Decide on” vs. “decide for”

What's the difference between "decide on something" and "decide for something"? For example, which preposition would you use in the following passage? After more than a decade of disagreement, ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
3
votes
5answers
20k views

“In a while” vs. “for a while”

I recently got a message that says Haven't heard anything from you in a while. I always thought that the right way to say this would be to use for insdead of in. Are both versions correct? ...
0
votes
2answers
130 views

Is it wrong to use “The Albatross is now on the sky”? [closed]

Is it wrong to use "The Albatross is now on the sky"? Is it like we should always say "The Albatross is now in the sky"? I would like to get an explanation for this. Thanks.
2
votes
2answers
2k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
0
votes
3answers
176 views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
1
vote
2answers
173 views

Why does “for” sound more appropriate than “during” in “I couldn't do anything for the rest of the day”?

I couldn't do anything for/during the rest of the day. I know that for sounds correct, perhaps because "the rest of the day" is a finite chunk of time like "one hour" or "one week". However, I ...
3
votes
2answers
2k views

“Split in half” vs. “split in two” — which one is correct?

Does the "in" imply multiplication, in which case split in half is correct, or is it division? It sounds like the latter to me, but I've heard it used both ways.
2
votes
1answer
426 views

“ benefits of ” vs. “ benefits to”

I encountered an expression: key benefits to using [something] To my mind the version below would sound more natural: key benefits of using [something] Are both versions correct? Is there ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Definition of “differentiate”: Difference “in” and difference “between”

I've seen online dictionaries defining the word differentiate as (along with other definitions): to mark or show a difference in : constitute a difference that distinguishes To perceive or ...
-1
votes
1answer
246 views

“Rectangle with 3 straight lines” vs “rectangle using 3 straight lines”

How do the three sentences below differ in meaning, and which can be answered with 'yes'? Can you draw a rectangle with 3 straight lines? Can you draw a rectangle by using 3 straight lines? ...
-1
votes
2answers
352 views

“Be accepted to” vs. “be accepted onto”

Do these variations mean anything different, or is one more correct? I have been accepted onto a course at the University of Stack Exchange I have been accepted to the Masters programme Are ...
2
votes
4answers
728 views

“Except for” vs. “except on”

I want to say that I have time to do the homework only on Sunday and on no other day. So can you help me choose which of the following sentences are considered idiomatic and common for native ...
-1
votes
1answer
381 views

“brush something up” vs. “brush up (on something)”: What is the difference?

For example, we have two sentences: I need to brush my French up a little bit. I need to brush up my French. and I need to brush up on my German. My German is weak. I had better brush ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“I care for you” versus “I care about you”

I would like to know if there is a semantic difference between I care for you and I care about you.
0
votes
3answers
370 views

“On aisle two” vs. “in aisle two”

In supermarkets in the United States, I tend to hear this often: Cleanup on aisle two [or some other number]. Would in be as good as on? How is in different from on in this context?
-2
votes
1answer
113 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
0
votes
2answers
126 views

Usage of “against” in “progress against our strategic objectives”

I have one more question concerning Lucy Kellaway’s 2012 Golden flannel Award . The another contender of the Preposition Award was a usage of against. The first was shown to advantage recently in ...
1
vote
1answer
130 views

“Chance of [gerund]” vs. “chance at [gerund]”

Which is correct? If you tell me the cause, I will have a better chance at fixing the problem. If you tell me the cause, I will have a better chance of fixing the problem. A quick ...
4
votes
4answers
308 views

Usage of “to” in “I've got some slides to talk to”

In Lucy Kellaway’s 2012 Golden flannel Award, the Preposition Award is given to a usage of to. But the winner is the innocuous word “to” as increasingly heard in presentations: “I’ve got some ...
0
votes
2answers
464 views

“In the next ten minutes” vs. “for the next ten minutes”

I am planning to do it in the next ten minutes. I am planning to do it for the next ten minutes. Do the two sentences mean the same thing? I am sure using for is correct, but I want to ...
2
votes
5answers
599 views

What does “by spring 2013” imply? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does “notified by [date]” include the end date? “I will do it by Monday”. Does it mean before the beginning or before the end of Monday? If something has to be ...
-1
votes
4answers
128 views

On the various meanings of “over” [closed]

Could you tell me the meanings of over in the following? The girl wandered over the field. The girls wandered over the field. The girl walked over the field. The girls walked over the field.  Does ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

“In” or “of” for a location? [closed]

Would I say “Human Services in New York” or “Human Services of New York” if the Human Services serves and is located in New York but is not actually owned or governed by New York?
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Is there any difference in meaning between “All these” and “All of these”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “all this” instead of “all of this”? Are they fully interchangeable, or do they have a somewhat different usage? Common sense suggests that "all ...
2
votes
1answer
164 views

“Accuse as” in comparison to “accuse of”

I stumbled upon this sentence: I accuse myself and others as having been irrational in the way we have been using statistics on a key notion of rationality. Is there a difference in ...