0
votes
1answer
65 views

What does “straight out of [person]” mean?

I know the meaning of the straight out. But what does it mean with of? For example: It’s straight out of Alice Miller.
1
vote
1answer
183 views

“Mistaken as” vs. “mistaken for”

I heard someone use the words mistaken as rather than mistaken for. Is this correct? If it is correct then what is the difference between the two? Is it ever wrong to use mistaken as, and if so, why? ...
2
votes
2answers
192 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
0
votes
2answers
277 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
4
votes
3answers
141 views

Is the opposite of 'within', 'without'? [duplicate]

Typically without is used to mean not having something. E.g. He went to work without his pants on. However, I'm wondering if it can be used for outside the bounds of. We do this with within. ...
0
votes
1answer
264 views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
4
votes
8answers
143 views

What is the difference between “fill” and “fill in”?

I am confused by fill and fill in. I checked online, and both forms are used in fill a hole fill in a hole So I am wondering is there any difference in meaning between them? If not, what's the ...
0
votes
2answers
90 views

“Witness to” vs. “witness of”

What is the difference in meaning between "a witness to" and "a witness for"? E.g., Then I saw the souls of those who had been beheaded for their witness to Jesus and for the word of God... ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

level of detail between

The same level of detail between the 3D models and the real objects has been achieved. In formal language, does this sentence make sense? I'm not sure about the use of the preposition "between" ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Why is there an “in” in “she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government”?

I just don't know why there's an in in the following sentence: If she succeeds, she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government. Taken from this CNN story. Why must there ...
0
votes
3answers
1k views

'In order to' or 'to'

Which sentence is correct and why? What is the difference in meaning? I have already written to you, and I received your reply to submit my documents. I have already written to you, and I ...
0
votes
1answer
133 views

What is the meaning of “on” in this sentence? [closed]

I saw this sentence "I go on a picnic." What is the meaning of "on" in this sentence.
3
votes
3answers
129 views

“covered by” vs. “covered with”

I found this sentence in some book: Imagine a young child who already knows that creatures that live in water are fish, they have gills, and their skin is covered by scales. Saying “their skin ...
-1
votes
1answer
968 views

implement something for/in/on/with something?

Which preposition is correct to use in the following sentence?: Implementation of this technique for/in/on/with complex objects is complicated (meaning: it is complicated to apply this technique ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “made from” and “made of” [duplicate]

What's the difference between "made from" and "made of"? Could anyone give me some examples?
1
vote
1answer
85 views

The meaning of 'be of' [closed]

What about such a statement that I found in one of the books for ESL learners: 'what is it of?' or 'what are they of?' What's the meaning of 'be of' here?
0
votes
3answers
253 views

“During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company” — does it mean that 1988 was included?

I am an ESL student and I wonder what the following sentence means. During 1985 to 1988 , I worked at X company Does it mean that 1988 was included? I am not quite sure about the meaning ...
0
votes
3answers
123 views

“Skyscrapers are of various shapes” vs. “skyscrapers are various shapes”

Skyscrapers are of various shapes. Skyscrapers are various shapes. Why do we use of in the sentence above? Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?
2
votes
4answers
7k views

Use of “I for one” [closed]

When we say “for one” in a sentence, what does it mean? I heard a sentence in a TV program where Robin Hood said: Who will bear this injustice? I, for one, will not. As I understand it, “I ...
1
vote
2answers
292 views

How to use the word 'contrary'?

Is it right to say contrary to our interest to reduce the size of the paper I want to say that we want to reduce the size of the paper but we cannot do it, due to specific reasons.
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Recommendation of” vs. “recommendation for” – what is the difference?

Which of the following sentences is correct? We are glad to provide a recommendation of a good work you did. We are glad to provide a recommendation for a good work you did.
0
votes
6answers
470 views

What does “gut over” mean?

What does "gutted over" mean in Javad Zarif's recent tweet? Mr.Secretary, was it Iran that gutted over half of US draft Thursday night? and publicly commented against it Friday morning?
0
votes
2answers
89 views

Apply to a university to study/for studying..?

I'm writing my CV and do not know how to correctly say that: * After I graduated from X (//X is a high school), I applied to a university to study chemistry and also computer systems. * I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
157 views

Emphasis is put on relation of A and B, instead of/on

Having the following sentence, I'm not sure how to use prepositions after 'instead': The emphasis is put on the relation between A and B, instead of on A and B themselves. Is "instead of on" ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.”

“it would not be fair to everyone else for me to eat all the oranges.” Is that correct? Why there is "FOR", would it not work simply with "WHEN"? “it would not be fair to everyone else ...
3
votes
3answers
191 views

Does “a value between two values” imply the two values are included within the range?

For example, if a there is a validation message that specifies that a number "must be a value between 1 and 100" does that imply that 1 and 100 are part of the allowed set of values? I would suggest ...
0
votes
1answer
91 views

“In extensive grounds” vs. “on extensive grounds”

If there is a large house, can I say either of the following? The house stands in extensive grounds. The house stands on extensive grounds. Which one makes sense?
1
vote
4answers
82 views

“Tune to <something>” - does it make sense?

I am wondering if saying "tune to this music" would make sense? Guitars can be tuned to particular note, can people tune to song, or music, or idea? Google doesn't return many results for "tune to" ...
-1
votes
1answer
774 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

“Absorbed in” vs. “absorbed with”

That young man was absorbed in his big camera. He was shooting a short movie of people and passers by who were singing and reading the poems under the trees. If I use with instead of in, does it ...
0
votes
1answer
79 views

“Developed by” vs “Developed at”

Normally I see things written this way : Developed by Joe Doe But I have also seen instances where it says: Developed by Company Inc. Now, I know it doesn't make sense to say: ...
1
vote
2answers
209 views

“Holding her finger” vs “holding on her finger” vs “holding onto her finger.”

Mary peered down at the beach, and holding her index finger, she sank back to her seat with a sigh. Mary peered down at the beach, and holding on her index finger, she sank back to her seat ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

When is between inclusive and when exclusive?

It seems that the exact meaning of between is very tied to its specific usage. What should I assume in a general situation about the inclusivity of between. Consider: "Pick a number between 1 and ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Decide on” vs. “decide for”

What's the difference between "decide on something" and "decide for something"? For example, which preposition would you use in the following passage? After more than a decade of disagreement, ...
2
votes
1answer
87 views

“A tool to do” vs. “a tool that does” vs. “a tool for doing”

I'm the curator of the Open Web Platform Daily Digest link. In the "Tools" section of each daily I write entries in this format: tool_name, tool_description For example: hapi, a server framework ...
5
votes
5answers
35k views

“In a while” vs. “for a while”

I recently got a message that says Haven't heard anything from you in a while. I always thought that the right way to say this would be to use for insdead of in. Are both versions correct? ...
0
votes
2answers
140 views

Is it wrong to use “The Albatross is now on the sky”? [closed]

Is it wrong to use "The Albatross is now on the sky"? Is it like we should always say "The Albatross is now in the sky"? I would like to get an explanation for this. Thanks.
2
votes
2answers
4k views

“Starting with” vs. “starting from”

I would like to ask about the difference between the two phrases starting with and starting from. Take the following two sentences for example: Please give me all the names starting with A. ...
0
votes
3answers
208 views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
1
vote
2answers
208 views

Why does “for” sound more appropriate than “during” in “I couldn't do anything for the rest of the day”?

I couldn't do anything for/during the rest of the day. I know that for sounds correct, perhaps because "the rest of the day" is a finite chunk of time like "one hour" or "one week". However, I ...
3
votes
3answers
3k views

“Split in half” vs. “split in two” — which one is correct?

Does the "in" imply multiplication, in which case split in half is correct, or is it division? It sounds like the latter to me, but I've heard it used both ways.
2
votes
1answer
735 views

“ benefits of ” vs. “ benefits to”

I encountered an expression: key benefits to using [something] To my mind the version below would sound more natural: key benefits of using [something] Are both versions correct? Is there ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Definition of “differentiate”: Difference “in” and difference “between”

I've seen online dictionaries defining the word differentiate as (along with other definitions): to mark or show a difference in : constitute a difference that distinguishes To perceive or ...
-1
votes
1answer
291 views

“Rectangle with 3 straight lines” vs “rectangle using 3 straight lines”

How do the three sentences below differ in meaning, and which can be answered with 'yes'? Can you draw a rectangle with 3 straight lines? Can you draw a rectangle by using 3 straight lines? ...
-1
votes
2answers
613 views

“Be accepted to” vs. “be accepted onto”

Do these variations mean anything different, or is one more correct? I have been accepted onto a course at the University of Stack Exchange I have been accepted to the Masters programme Are ...
2
votes
4answers
974 views

“Except for” vs. “except on”

I want to say that I have time to do the homework only on Sunday and on no other day. So can you help me choose which of the following sentences are considered idiomatic and common for native ...
-2
votes
1answer
901 views

“brush something up” vs. “brush up (on something)”: What is the difference?

For example, we have two sentences: I need to brush my French up a little bit. I need to brush up my French. and I need to brush up on my German. My German is weak. I had better brush ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“I care for you” versus “I care about you”

I would like to know if there is a semantic difference between I care for you and I care about you.
0
votes
3answers
467 views

“On aisle two” vs. “in aisle two”

In supermarkets in the United States, I tend to hear this often: Cleanup on aisle two [or some other number]. Would in be as good as on? How is in different from on in this context?