0
votes
1answer
134 views

“I'm sorry for” vs. “I'm sorry about”

Can I use about and for interchangeably? If not, when should I use either? Which is more common? I'm sorry for/about yesterday. I'm sorry for/about my bad English. I'm sorry for/about that. ...
2
votes
3answers
122 views

In 2-3 days vs Within 2-3 days

I have always thought that within means "till some point" while in means "at some point". In 2 weeks - i.e. in 14 days from now. Within 2 weeks - i.e. during today or the next 14 days, not later. ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

What’s difference between “in” + VERBing compared with just plain VERBing alone?

In the following example from page 145 of Frederick Schauer’s Thinking Like a Lawyer, what would differ if the sentence were to start with Being instead of In being? In being an empirical ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

“solve with” vs “solve for”

I would like to get a clarification whether I do understand and use those two phrases correctly or not. The context is solving a mathematical problem. solved with sth - means a problem is tackled ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
0
votes
1answer
559 views

What’s the difference between “in” and “at” when used before a Location/Site/Country/County etc

We always were told that you could use the word in before a place which is a large space e.g. country/city etc. Whereas, before a smaller site or place you should use at. But actually I don’t know ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

“to” or “of” or both whilst referring to cities and places

I saw these billboards today: Turkey home of Istanbul Turkey home of Nemrut Nemrut is a mountain in Turkey with prehistoric monuments, and I think home of is the new slogan for Turkey. ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Which preposition to use with “forum”

I would hugely appreciate your help thinking through the tagline for a new online forum we are creating. The current version reads: A Forum on Our Economy, National Security and Sustainability. ...
0
votes
1answer
120 views

Is there any difference between “invite to” and “invite for”?

Is there any difference between invite to and invite for in terms of usage and meaning? For example: invite someone to lunch, dinner, a party, or a meeting but invite them for a drink or a meal
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Difference between “in” and “to” in this context

My friend is taking an English conversation class. In it, she said I have been teaching math in high schools for more than 10 years. Before that I taught math in junior high schools. However, ...
-1
votes
1answer
118 views

Distinction between with/by means of

Consider the following examples: Data are usually input by means of a keyboard or scanner. The variation of the distance was measured with a magnetic position detector. We can change this value by ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “made from” and “made of” [duplicate]

What's the difference between "made from" and "made of"? Could anyone give me some examples?
0
votes
3answers
126 views

“Skyscrapers are of various shapes” vs. “skyscrapers are various shapes”

Skyscrapers are of various shapes. Skyscrapers are various shapes. Why do we use of in the sentence above? Is there any difference in meaning between the two sentences?
1
vote
1answer
139 views

What are the differences between the following sentences containing “surprised”?

I have written four similar sentences using surprised: I was deeply surprised at the news. I was deeply surprised at learning the news. I was deeply surprised at being told the news. I ...
1
vote
2answers
169 views

Up one's ass vs. In one's ass

Why is stick/shove/etc up one's ass much more common than in/into one's ass?
1
vote
2answers
138 views

What's the difference between: people in England, people of England and English people? [closed]

People in England clean glass with newspaper. People of England clean glass with newspaper. English people clean glass with newspaper. I would like to know which one sounds most natural. I would ...
0
votes
2answers
261 views

Difference between “sleeping with Sean Parker” and “sleeping on Sean Parker”?

In the movie Social Network, there is a scene where Sean Parker corrected a sentence said by a girl who he just spent a night with: She was rather astonished when she realized the man standing in ...
-1
votes
1answer
854 views

Difference between 'meant by' and 'meant with'?

Is there a difference in meaning or usage between 'meant by' and 'meant with'? Many questions about meanings with this tag have the wording 'What is meant by...?'. In the text I am currently reading ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

“Developed by” vs “Developed at”

Normally I see things written this way : Developed by Joe Doe But I have also seen instances where it says: Developed by Company Inc. Now, I know it doesn't make sense to say: ...
0
votes
2answers
122 views

Usage of “to” in the statement

Is there any difference between the two statements below? If yes, please let us know the difference. I sent him a note yesterday I sent a note to him yesterday If both the statements are ...
1
vote
3answers
1k views

Is there any real difference between “to” as a preposition and “to” as an adverb?

I'm really in doubt. On the free dictionary I read this concept of "to" as a preposition: "1. (used for expressing motion or direction toward a place, person, or thing approached and reached): Come to ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Decide on” vs. “decide for”

What's the difference between "decide on something" and "decide for something"? For example, which preposition would you use in the following passage? After more than a decade of disagreement, ...
-1
votes
4answers
2k views

“Lay on the bed” vs. “lay in the bed” [closed]

Which one is more grammatically correct? I lay on the bed. I lay in the bed.
1
vote
0answers
34 views

The difference between “to someone” and “for someone” [duplicate]

To many people, we are the scariest animals in the world. For me, English is the easiest of all subjects. Why does the former sentence use "to" someone and the latter use "for" someone? ...
0
votes
3answers
217 views

'Meeting us' or 'meeting with us'?

What is the difference between meeting with someone or meeting someone? For example when I would like to ask someone if he is happy to meet with me and my friend for the first time, how should I ask? ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

“In a restaurant” or “at a restaurant” [duplicate]

Does anyone know if one should use "in a restaurant" or "at a restaurant" ? Ex: Having a romantic dinner in a restaurant or having a romantic dinner at a restaurant. What is the difference between ...
0
votes
2answers
927 views

“Download from” vs. “download off”

I usually download music off the web. I usually download music from the web. What is the difference in between off and from in these sentences? Which one is more suitable in this ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

“via” vs. “through”

Could you please explain what the difference in usage is between through and via, which sounds like a Latinism? Are they completely interchangeable?
-1
votes
1answer
325 views

“Rectangle with 3 straight lines” vs “rectangle using 3 straight lines”

How do the three sentences below differ in meaning, and which can be answered with 'yes'? Can you draw a rectangle with 3 straight lines? Can you draw a rectangle by using 3 straight lines? ...
-2
votes
1answer
987 views

“brush something up” vs. “brush up (on something)”: What is the difference?

For example, we have two sentences: I need to brush my French up a little bit. I need to brush up my French. and I need to brush up on my German. My German is weak. I had better brush ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“I care for you” versus “I care about you”

I would like to know if there is a semantic difference between I care for you and I care about you.
1
vote
3answers
207 views

“compiled with gcc” vs “compiled in gcc”

"This program was compiled with gcc." "This program was compiled in gcc." "This program was written in C++." "This program was written with C++." Note: gcc is a widely used compiler ...
3
votes
2answers
95 views

“length in bytes” vs “length by the byte” and “paid in hours” vs “paid by the hour”

"The variable len indicates the buffer length in bytes." "The variable len indicates the buffer length by the byte." I'm a computer programmer, so I know 1 is far more common than 2. ...
3
votes
2answers
125 views

“Moderator for” vs. “moderator of”

In OAAD, there's an example for the entry moderator: moderators of online discussion groups But I've seen the preposition for used in that context by native speakers too. Are they both correct? ...
0
votes
3answers
713 views

“in response to” vs “for response to”?

"I am writing in response to your mail." What does it mean by "in" in this sentence? Is "I am writing for response to your mail." acceptable?
0
votes
2answers
177 views

Step in/on/into the job market?

I am an international student. I wish to know which of the following I should use. Step into the job market Step in the job market Step on the job market
-1
votes
1answer
442 views

Which of the following sentences are correct?

Can someone please tell me which of the following sentences are correct and which are the differences between them? Prove me wrong. Prove I'm wrong. Prove me I'm wrong. Prove me that I'm ...
-1
votes
1answer
139 views

“In avoiding failure” vs. “For avoiding failure”?

1: In avoiding failure, we must be careful. 2: For avoiding failure, we must be careful. What are the subtle differences between the two sentences?
0
votes
2answers
7k views

“I did it by myself” vs “I did it myself” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Myself vs by myself "I did it by myself" and "I did it myself"; what's the exact and subtle difference between the two?
0
votes
1answer
5k views

When to use “include” and “including”?

I know that include is a verb while including is a preposition but they made me confuse when it comes to their usage. I usually confuse when to use include with including. Most Thais like ...
1
vote
3answers
883 views

Usage differences between “than”, “to”, and “over”

I understand that than, rather than, over and to are used to compare things. How ever I am not sure when to use those for specific scenarios. Are these interchangeable? Consider the sentence below: ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Is there any difference in meaning between “All these” and “All of these”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is it correct to use “all this” instead of “all of this”? Are they fully interchangeable, or do they have a somewhat different usage? Common sense suggests that "all ...
3
votes
3answers
845 views

Difference between “before” and “in front of”

Which one is correct? The patterns swam before her eyes. OR The patterns swam in front of her eyes. I know that "before" is mostly used when we talk about the time, but is it right to ...
15
votes
3answers
48k views

“Thru” vs. “through”

Could anyone explain the differences between "thru" and "through"? Is the difference only in spelling? Is "thru" some sort of slang?
13
votes
7answers
63k views

Difference between “at” and “in” when specifying location

I am used to saying "I am in India.". But somewhere I saw it said "I am at Puri (Oriisa)". I would like to know the differences between "in" and "at" in the above two sentences.
4
votes
2answers
3k views

Difference between “stick with” and “stick to”?

The more I think about it the more confused I get: One good example is here: Hmm. Maybe something like this. It's the end of the day and things didn't go well. We're meeting to talk about what ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“All X” vs. “all of X” vs. “all the X”

Is there any difference between "all X", "all of the X", "all the X"? E.g., all friends all of the friends all the friends
-1
votes
2answers
2k views

“at line” vs “in line” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which preposition in front of “line” — “on”, “in”, “at”? Given a numbered list of lines of text (in my case an ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Prepositions to use when indicating locations [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When should I use “in” or “on”? I am always confused with the prepositions to use when indicating an event happening at a place. Should I use ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Difference between 'decided on' and 'decided to'?

Examples: I have decided on a blue carpet for the bedroom. I have decided to emigrate to Australia. What exactly is the difference between "decided on" and "decided to"? Is the usage simply based on ...