2
votes
2answers
171 views

I work “in a grocery store” or “at a grocery store” [duplicate]

I am not a native speaker but both sounds good to me. Which one should be more accurate or in fact correct.
2
votes
3answers
2k views

What's the difference between “content” and “contented”?

What's the difference between "content" and "contented"? I feel content with my present condition. I feel contented with my present condition. When she calls me by my name sweetly, I ...
1
vote
2answers
351 views

Prepositions and Corners

Does one use "on" or "at" in the following: Kate met him at the corner Kate met him on the corner. Or are they the same?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

“Acted in the benefit of ” vs. “acted for the benefit of ” vs. “acted to the benefit of ”

I am not sure about this quote: As to whether the president acted for the benefit of the majority, 35 percent of the respondents said that he did not, 30 percent that he only partly acted in the ...
3
votes
1answer
249 views

“Both of” vs. just “both” with mathematical symbols

In mathematical writing we use letters to denote the mathematical objects we are writing about. I wonder how to use "both of" in the following phrase: Both of I and I' are irreducible ideals. ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

Difference in application of “in” and “at” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “In school” vs “at school” I've been writing some rules for an NLP recently, and I've come across a small problem... What is the difference in ...
9
votes
6answers
14k views

“On/at/for/over the weekend” in American English

Some sources say that "at the weekend" is wrong, while other ones say it's correct. Which form is acceptable in American English? On Saturdays her sister Ann usually comes to stay with Mary ...
4
votes
2answers
7k views

“In college” versus “at college” versus “at university” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which one is more correct: “works at a university” or “works in a university”? It seems that only in the U.S. one says that they are or were "in ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Order of preposition in US and UK English

In Britain we'd say He had a black hat on. Speakers of American English are more likely to say* He had on a black hat. The latter just seems wrong to me. Is my intuition correct or are ...
17
votes
5answers
3k views

ON an American street, but IN a British one. Do the twain ever meet?

In the United States, we say that someone lives on a street, whereas I've noticed that British people say in. For instance: Bubba lives on Washington Street. Colin lives in Cavendish Avenue. I ...
4
votes
4answers
40k views

Does the phrase “who's in?” or “I'm in!” exist in (informal) English?

I really think I've heard it in some American sitcom/sitcoms, meaning something like participating in. "I want to play football. Who's in?" — "Great idea, I'm in!" Does it really exist, or am I wrong? ...
4
votes
2answers
10k views

“Interfere in” vs. “interfere with”

I was taught that when interfere is followed by in, it means to get involved in something that doesn't concern you; when followed by with, it means to prevent something from being done. And this is ...
3
votes
3answers
2k views

“Late to the party” vs. “late for the party”

I've heard both versions, usually in similar contexts. Which one is correct or more correct — or more prevalent — in the USA? He: This deal ends at 7 p.m. She: Sucks, I am late to the party.
1
vote
3answers
981 views

“Referenced in” or “referenced from”?

Which of these sentences is more correct? ABC should not be referenced from file X. ABC should not be referenced in file X.
2
votes
3answers
5k views

“On which” or “upon which”

Today, I am writing technical documentation that instructs the user how to install software to a server. I encountered the following sentence and am unsure which is correct: When installing to a ...
12
votes
6answers
1k views

“Toward” or “towards” – what would a native speaker use?

In this question we learn that toward and towards are interchangeable, but that the former is somewhat more typical of U.S. English and the latter of British English, although there is some indication ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

The X in the hat

English is not my native language so I have gone through the pain of learning the difference between in, on, and at. However, it is common in the U.S. to refer to someone wearing a hat as X in the ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

“At the beginning of the century” or “in the beginning of the century”?

At the beginning of the century. In the beginning of the century. How to clearly distinguish when to use at, or in?