0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is there a word for the opposing ends of a tangible scale, as there are “obverse” and “reverse” to describe the physical sides of a coin-like object [closed]

I feel that obverse and reverse are too "Geometric" to properly describe more complex ideas in society where something is not in reality in a completely opposite position in relation to another. For ...
0
votes
2answers
119 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
1
vote
3answers
197 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
1
vote
4answers
508 views

“In” vs. “of” after the superlative form of adjectives

Hanna's the youngest member of the team. Why isn't it "in the team"? The rule that we covered in out textbook New Total English pre-intermediate says that we use in with groups of people and ...
1
vote
1answer
558 views

to be certain to do something versus to be certain of doing something

"Paul is certain to win the race." "Paul is certain of winning the race." What is the difference between these two sentences?
2
votes
3answers
217 views

Adjective + “of them”

My wife and I were discussing whether it is allowable to put an adjective in front of "of them". For instance, I could say "I want 5 cats" and "I want 5 of them". However, while it sounds perfectly ...
1
vote
2answers
177 views

Why “afraid of” and not “brave of”?

Recently my preschooler's teacher started teaching kids that they should be "brave of" something and not "afraid of" it. Maybe it is simply because "brave of" is never used, but that syntax strikes me ...
3
votes
2answers
660 views

Can the phrase “be necessary to” only be used on people?

My teacher told me that the phrase be necessary to can be used only on people. For example, Something is necessary to someone. Assuming she is correct, then this following sentence, the one I ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do we use “accessible to” instead of “accessible from”? [closed]

I wonder why we use "accessible to" as a meaning of "can be accessed from", for example, "How to Make Your Blog Accessible to Blind Reader". It makes more sense to me when using 'accessible from'. Is ...
1
vote
2answers
4k views

“Irrelevant for” vs. “irrelevant to”

Reading some of the comments on StackExhange, I came across this is irrelevant for this question Shouldn't it be "irrelevant to this question"? Searching on Google I found both are used in ...
1
vote
4answers
153 views

“Vegetation changes” vs. “changes in vegetation” vs. “vegetative changes” vs…?

When referring to changes in the amount and/or quality of vegetation on the ground, which is more appropriate between "vegetation changes", "changes in vegetation" or "vegetative changes"? Any other ...
2
votes
4answers
642 views

Is “[I am] possessed of impeccable grammar” correct, idiomatic, or ironic?

If it's a correct, non-idiomatic usage, is "possessed" an adjective, or...? What is "of" under that circumstance?
25
votes
4answers
3k views

“Bad with something” or “bad at something”?

In a question on Spanish.StackExchange, a question came up about expressing that you are bad at remembering or doing something. Is one "bad at something" or "bad with something" (nouns)? What about ...
2
votes
2answers
405 views

Can I say “medium-term”, as with the adjectives “short-term” and “long-term”? Do they need prepositions?

I would like to use an adjective to express something in between the two adjectives short-term and long-term. Does medium-term make sense here? What is the adjective I can use? What preposition, if ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

“How big of a problem” vs. “how big a problem”

Quite a few phrases in English are constructed like so: How [adjective] a [noun]...? This is the question form of the construction, which is often answered with the negative: Not that ...