Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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“on Mondays” v. “on Monday” with the adverb, “always”

Are all of these correct? I wash my car on Mondays. I always wash my car on Monday. I always wash my car on Mondays. I know #1 is correct, and it means every Monday. However, I'm not sure if #2 ...
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32 views

Do I use commas before the word “to” in the following sentence:

The JP-8 pipelines included 7.4 miles of parallel 10-inch pipelines from the Navy's transfer pump house manifold to the custody transfer to the Anderson Air Force Base.
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77 views

Use of preposition “with” after the word “marry”

Is it right to use the preposition "with" instead of "to" after the word "marry or married" under any given circumstances if we change the position of gender being mentioned? For example: "She is ...
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1answer
48 views

Is the “to” required in “the person (to) whom I granted freedom”?

I had this phrase "the person whom I granted freedom" in something I wrote; a friend maintains that it must be "the person to whom I granted freedom."
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what is the expression according as use for exactly? [on hold]

What is wrong with these two sentences? Rearrange these boxes according as you are told. Rearrange these boxes accordingly as you are told. Are they both grammatically correct and if not what is wrong ...
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2answers
51 views

Phrasal verbs: single entity?

I am teaching English to my cousin, but I am not sure how to explain phrasal verbs correctly. For example "take off". I explain it as two words but a single entity. When I ask her to name a verb in ...
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2answers
76 views

Is this right: “the whole France”?

I am not sure if this phrase is right: “for the whole France”. Here's the context: Sam applied these methods successfully at some sites in France and then was extended for the whole France by ...
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3answers
39 views

Is “a ten-minutes of a song” right?

I'm curious about if "I need a ten-minutes of 'SONG' to do sth." was right in English. Thanks for reading this quesiton
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2answers
62 views

“As of this morning” vs. “as at this morning”

As of this morning, he was not in support of the motion. As at this morning, he was not in support of the motion. Which is correct?
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73 views

Is the “sorry to [infinitive] ” structure always grammatical?

I'm sorry to be so late. I'm sorry to hear about your sick mother. I'm sorry to waste your time. I'm sorry to make you feel so sad. I'm sorry to frighten you. I'm sorry to disagree ...
7
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1answer
164 views

What colour eyes

I've just stumbled on this sentence What colour eyes does she have? in my grammar book. What got me interested in this is the combination of the words colour, eyes with what and without any ...
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22 views

Grades ___ school subject [migrated]

Which variant is correct? My grades in Geography are B, A+ and C. My grades from Geography are B, A+ and C. My grades for Geography are B, A+ and C. My grades of Geography are B, A+ and C. My ...
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35 views

correct preposition

I'm preparing a short paragraph for testing my students reading skills. The title is: "Spanish And English United by a Song" or should I choose "Spanish and English United in a Song"? My students are ...
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1answer
33 views

Are “in” and “at” the same in some situations? [duplicate]

If someone calls me, and I say I can't talk to them at the moment, because I'm at school, is there any difference between the following two sentences? I'm at school. I'm in school. Do ...
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38 views

What preposition does “rate … criteria” take?

I'm writing up specs for a website with learning materials for our alpha testers to comment on. Among others, I'm describing the rating system: the materials can be rated (...) several criteria (such ...
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42 views

“Me neither” - why oblique case?

I don't like white wine. Me neither. We're talking about subjects here, so naturally the pronoun should be "I". The use of "me" would only make sense to me if "neither" was a postposition. ...
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4answers
93 views

Is it right to say “before since”?

I wonder if "before since" is right in my sentence. If not, could you please help me improve it? This company provides products since 2010. Consequently, there is no record of this product before ...
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2answers
21 views

Correct preposition to go with “inquiry”?

I'm trying to figure out which preposition to use together with "inquiry". For example, take the following sentence: I have asked Bob, but he doesn't know. Now I'd like to express the same using ...
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3answers
96 views

Particle or preposition?

I'm studying Spanish and I have some questions about the grammatical parallels in English. Le gustan cocinar y hornear. He likes to cook and (to) bake. When an infinitive is used in ...
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31 views

in/on with dmy dates

When writing dates in prose in the dmy format (29 March 2014), is the correct preposition "in" or "on". I'm seeing it with "in" here, but that construction is foreign to me. It was released in 29 ...
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2answers
77 views

Why do we say “the Indians were put on reservations” and not “in reservations”

The preposition "on" is used to refer to a surface like "on the floor" or "on the ceiling" "in" is used to refer as a enclosed space like "in a country" or "in a city". Why do we say "the Indians ...
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1answer
85 views

“Open to opportunities” vs. “open for opportunities”

I want to know which sentence is correct and why: I'm open to new opportunities. I'm open for new opportunities.
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3answers
22 views

“In the past” or “Into the past”?

Maybe my question is only relevant for my current context. I'm writing a documentation that shouldn't allow a user (using a calendar) to add an event in/into the past. So, should it be in or into?
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1answer
35 views

“both (of the) versions are correct”

Both of the versions are correct. Both versions are correct. Are both of these correct? If only one, is it the latter?
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2answers
49 views

“At this section…” vs. “in this section…”

At/in this section, you must enter your shipping details. Should I use at or in?
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28 views

“To predicate” + of or + as or + some other preposition

I'm interested in Definition 1.1 at Oxford Dictionaries which exemplifies "predicated of." Yet, would "predicate as" be equally correct? Google Ngram depicts a difference, but not Google Books ...
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4answers
74 views

Is it “described in” or “described on”?

This one is probably fairly obvious for native speakers, but I'm always confused. I am writing an article and I want to say that such and such methodology is described in/on a table, a figure or a ...
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36 views

“Course in/on/of/for nursing specialty”

Which preposition would be the correct one? the course in/on/of/for nursing speciality
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43 views

When should I use “opportunity of” and when “opportunity from”?

Which is the proper preposition, from or of?: There are many opportunities from/of the energy turnaround.
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30 views

“These findings are critical [to inform/for informing] future research” [duplicate]

In this sentence, would you use "to inform" or "for informing"? These findings are critical ______ future research Likewise, would you use "to understand" or "for understanding" in the ...
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62 views

About prepositions [duplicate]

Find out the difference between these two sets of sentences. It's in the tree. It's on the tree. On Christmas, we exchange gifts. At Christmas, we exchange gifts.
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2answers
51 views

difference between progress ON and progress OF

I'm still confused even after studying the prepositions on and of. Can you please help me and explain to me the difference of the ff: progress ON your project progress OF your project ...
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1answer
51 views

How can this be worded better? [closed]

How can this be better expressed? In respect of Anna's written wishes, there will be no funeral.
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13 views

Place your orders on time/in time? [duplicate]

If you want to inform someone in advance to do something early enough so the person won't be in trouble later, do you say on time or in time? It's not a specified time, like order it today between 12 ...
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1answer
37 views

Why is there an “in” in “she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government”?

I just don't know why there's an in in the following sentence: If she succeeds, she'll be in the first woman to hold a top position in the government. Taken from this CNN story. Why must there ...
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27 views

We think we have a top-seller on/in our hands? [closed]

I know this on our hands/in our hands discrepancy has been discussed here in a broad way, but since it's idiomatic, I think it would be helpful to consider a few specific examples, like the one here. ...
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3answers
763 views

Would a golfer say, “I shot for 200 yards”?

I'm wondering if "for" is the correct word to use in the phrase, "I shot for 200 yards". This is in relation to a golf video game I'm working on. After the shot, the computer tells you, "You shot for ...
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1answer
43 views

Meaning of “as” in the following sentence

Consider this sentence: "I would like to be concealed as a man." Would this mean, "I am a man, and I would like to be concealed," or, "Conceal what I am so that I may seem to be a man"? Or, is the ...
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34 views

Question on “Out of”

In "out of", is the "out" considered a preposition or an adverb?
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125 views

Articles and prepositions in a series

I am writing a technical report. After finishing the first draft, I asked my friends, who are native English speakers, to proofread my writing. They found and corrected several errors in my report. ...
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36 views

The preposition with the word “value”?

Which is the correct way of writing? He bought 50 shares with the nominal value of ... (sum of money) He bought 50 shares of the nominal value of ... He bought 50 shares for the nominal value of ...
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44 views

“at event” vs. “on event”

What is a better preposition for the word "event"? at on Specifically I want to say: Lector at an event Lector on an event Which is the correct one?
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27 views

The difference between 'protect from' and 'protect against'

The Longman dictionary suggests two options regarding the word 'protect': protect somebody/something from something and protect somebody/something against something/ Examples: The cover protects the ...
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45 views

Meaning of “On” in non-physical situations [closed]

What is the meaning of "on" in non-physical situations? Of course "On" indicates a position above and being supported by something under it.For example, "A glass in on the table" and "A portrait is ...
0
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1answer
77 views

Some prepositions - confusion [closed]

Please can you tell me which of the two prepositions in the examples below are correct? Is it possible to use both of them? Thanks! :) Translate text into German / Translate text to German ...
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2answers
82 views

'quoted to you' or 'quoted for you'?

Which is correct? The price we quoted for you or The price we quoted to you I often stumble with this. I'm not sure how to use for you and to you.
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1answer
79 views

Is it ordinary to use “between” for selection among two or more things?

AP Radio News (March 3) narrated that: “It’s anybody’s guess who win the best picture. It seems to be a close race between “American Hustle,” “12 Years a Slave” and “Gravity.” I was under ...
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2answers
59 views

How to correctly use 'whereupon'?

How to use 'whereupon'? I'm making sense of it in the following example by taking 'whereupon' to mean 'which at'. 'This Is Jinsy is one of those weird British comedies, like The League of Gentleman ...
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1answer
68 views

It's fine by me

"Fine by me" seems like an unusual use of the word 'by'. Is it unique, or are there other cases like this? Is there a special term for this specific pattern?
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73 views

Is 'of' as in 'drink of' an old usage?

I drank of the jar. Is this 'of' an old usage? But I can't find the proof for that.