Tagged Questions

Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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2answers
19 views

the best preposition for “review”

What is the best preposition for a word "review"? Leave review of Macau/about Macau/on Macau. And what prepositions shouls be used in the sentence "We are looking reviews (about) Macau (by) the ...
1
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1answer
27 views

“For three years” vs “in three years” [duplicate]

I haven't talked to my wife for three years. I haven't talked to my wife in three years. Are in and for interchangeable in these sentences?
2
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1answer
37 views

“At the most difficult times” or “in the most difficult times”

In the example below which preposition is appropriate: at or in? Family will be there for you [at/in] the most difficult times no matter what.
2
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2answers
137 views

“At/on/in railway station”

Which preposition is correct? Now I am at/on/in the railway station.
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1answer
23 views

“headquarters of” vs. “headquarters for”… is there a difference?

Is there a difference between "headquarters of" and "headquarters for"? It is the headquarters of many branches. It is the headquarters for many branches. It is the headquarters of the party. It is ...
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1answer
15 views

What preposition should follow the adjective “parallel”?

When using the word parallel in communicating the state of being in a relationship between one line and another, what is the correct word to follow parallel? parallel to parallel with
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5answers
78 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
0
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1answer
53 views

Does “send” require a “to”? [duplicate]

Is the following grammatical? Should I send the letter to her? If it is, then how come that send can also be used without to? Should I send her the letter? What about the use of send in a ...
3
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3answers
108 views

“I belong to a greater stage”

Is it okay to say: I believe I belong to a greater stage. Basically, I want to say that I want to transit from my current position to a better one since I think I am skillful enough for the ...
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1answer
50 views

Is there any difference between “immune from” and “immune against” in the following sentence?

"His position as president renders him immune ..... criticism." Any subtle difference concerning the viability and efficacy of criticism, according to the preposition used? The Ngram shows ...
0
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3answers
54 views

Can we say “admitted to the mistakes”?

Can we say "admitted to the mistakes"? I think it should be admitted the mistakes and admitted to the hospital. The sentence that I am working on is it has not admitted to the mistakes in the ...
1
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1answer
27 views

Non-Adverbial “as is”

I know the common adverbial usage of "as is" as in, Leave it as is. As a non-native English speaker I found a strange-to-me but common English usage of non-adverbial "as is" and sometimes also "as ...
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1answer
47 views

“Go by a bus” or “go on a bus”?

I have been arguing with friends on this. Is it right to say 'go by a bus' or 'go on a bus'?
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1answer
34 views

“Better insight on my experience”? [duplicate]

Please take a look at my resume to have a better insight on my experience. From my point of view, it looks correct, but because I have never seen anything like this before, I have some doubts.
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0answers
26 views

“Even to me” or “even for me” [duplicate]

English prepositions are difficult even for/to me. Which one is correct, for or to? Is there a difference? Can they be used interchangeably?
0
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2answers
34 views

In the opposite direction to - OR - in the opposite direction from?

Which of these is correct? The second feels more logical, but I'm really not sure. Here's the context: 'They took a path away from the house that Jack was glad to see struck off in the opposite ...
0
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2answers
32 views

preposition for tie

is it correct using preposition (on) for the verb (tie)? when it is used with? And do we use it when we want to use it for ( fastening to another thing)? For example in this case: " more and more ...
0
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2answers
58 views

what does “in quiet sophistication” mean here?

"it strikes me as the last word in quiet sophistication." I have two questions here. First, I do not understand the meaning of "quiet sophistication." I know that sophistication is a trait ...
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2answers
41 views

“crying to George Jones albums” what does “to” mean here?

"Like me, Hugh was single, which came as no great surprise, considering that he spent his leisure time rolling out dough and crying to George Jones albums." This is an excerpt from a book I have been ...
0
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2answers
58 views

“In and of itself”? What does it mean?

"It might be different if he were flagging down a passing car or trying to phone for help, but typing, in and of itself, is not an inherently dramatic activity." In this sentence, I do not understand ...
0
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2answers
41 views

To be attained at/on?

I'm writing a math paper, so it would probably be easier to answer this question with some background in math. Assume I have a set of "things" and some function turning these things into numbers. I'm ...
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1answer
52 views

“Bump one's head on something” vs. “against something”

Can anyone help me understand the difference between bumping one's head on something and bumping it against it? Is there any substantial difference or are they used interchangeably?
0
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1answer
25 views

‘Means of ’ versus ‘means for’

Eating garlic has long been considered as a means for warding off malaise. Eating garlic has long been considered as a means of warding off malaise Which example is preferred and why? Many ...
2
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1answer
62 views

If you don't reply for the next three hours

Imagine I told you something like: If you don't reply for the next 3 hours, I will stop talking to you. What would you think the meaning was? Do you think it would be If you don't keep ...
4
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2answers
67 views

As to: Compound preposition [closed]

First, thank you Edwin Ashworth and RegDwigнt♦ for your comments. I was able to learn and recognize my mistake, obscuring the point of question. Here is as to I've wanted to discuss about: He was ...
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2answers
79 views

What preposition should be used in “Moving something __ M meters”? [closed]

I have four guesses so far: none, "on", "for", and "by".
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1answer
38 views

Can the heart 'approach what it yearns', or must it 'approach what it yearns for'?

Paul Simon's lyrics ... how the heart approaches what it yearns... has always seemed to me an incorrect usage, although it's difficult to state why. It seems to me that the verb yearn ...
1
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0answers
32 views

In “Bat Out of Hell”, should “Out of” be capitalized? [duplicate]

Should either or both words in "out of" be capitalized (e.g., Bat Out of Hell)? I wanted to clarify because the "o" is commonly capitalized in any Google search hits.
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1answer
65 views

The grammatical parts of speech in 'As ____ as when ___'

What parts of speech are the each of the individual words in as penniless as when. For example when used in the following sentence: They were as penniless as when the little man found them.
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4answers
120 views

“separated by”, “separated with”, or does it not matter?

I'm describing how you write something down (specifically, an array initializer in JavaScript, but that's not important), and find myself intrigued by the choice of using "separated by" vs. "separated ...
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votes
2answers
52 views

What is a Prepositional complement?

Could someone tell me what Prepositional complement is? The text that brought this issue up says: ... a possessive is used as Prepositional complement. They give an example: what business is ...
2
votes
1answer
85 views

Valid from and valid to or until?

Would valid to make sense when refering to an expiration date? I've got this text right now: Valid from: 01/10/2014 Valid to: 10/10/2014 It doesn't sound correct. Should it be until? In which ...
0
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0answers
17 views

Is “happened Tuesday” (without “on”) a valid pattern? [duplicate]

The album was released Tuesday and has been well-received by […] Shouldn't it be "released on Tuesday"? Where did the "on" go? I think dropping the preposition is confusing, but I see it ...
4
votes
2answers
226 views

Using the word 'come' to mean 'when it comes'

I am currently playing the game Max Payne 3 and I came across an interesting formulation: I hope Fabiana will not be served to the fishes come feeding time. Is this normal in American English?
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1answer
36 views

Are prepositions 'on' or 'to' in the description of relative position necessary?

I'd like to find the shortest way to describe relative position of object A that is on the left of object B. Are prepositions like 'on' or 'to' necessary? Is it correct to say I found two chairs ...
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0answers
38 views

“To How” or “In How”?

I have the sentence: "Since that experience, I have made changes to how I address all of my courses." Should I use "to how" or "in how" for any grammatical reason(s), or is it simply a matter of ...
1
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1answer
45 views

“Indispensible for” vs, “indispensible to”

What is the difference between "indispensible to" and "indispensible for"? Likewise, between "it is important to me" and "it is important for me", which one is correct?
1
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2answers
30 views

What's the difference between 'there are two parts of it' and 'there are two parts to it'?

My student asked me the above question and I'm not quite sure what the correct answer is. Any advice would be hugely appreciated.
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0answers
13 views

“Outside of X” vs “outside X” [duplicate]

I've noticed more and more that when referring to a country or place the use of 'of' is increasing. For example: Outside of France, it's unusual to meet a Johnny Halliday fan. Why use of here? ...
1
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0answers
15 views

How the verb becomes a gerund after “to”, e.g. “committed to helping you” [duplicate]

When we say I am looking forward to seeing you. instead of I am looking forward to see you. is the word "to" a preposition, attached to the verb as one word?
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1answer
44 views

ON or AT the surface of the shell? [closed]

On the wall, at the table but how to say ON or AT the surface of the shell?
2
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1answer
79 views

“Tax on” vs. “tax over”

Does one pay tax on income or pay tax over income? I come across both regularly. On seems to be preferred usage, but I'd like to know which is most correct or formal and why.
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1answer
45 views

Can a kangaroo jump higher than/above the building?

A building cannot jump. We generally use "higher" to campare with something that can jump. But, can we use "higher" in this context? It comes from the following joke - Q. Can a kangaroo jump higher ...
2
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2answers
325 views

“Knowledgeable about” vs. “knowledgeable on” vs. “knowledgeable in”

When should I use each of the collocations "knowledgeable about", "knowledgeable on", and "knowledgeable in"?
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2answers
82 views

Why must the infinitive be used after “I am qualified to”?

I am not able to understand why the infinitive must be used after "I am qualified to". For example I am qualified to teach. Does not to play the role of preposition in this sentence? If the ...
0
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1answer
61 views

Preposition and tense-Homework

In today's exam, I had few grammar questions. I am doubtful in two questions. Please check my answers and correct the mistakes, if any. 1.Fill with suitable prepositions. There lived _ _ _ _ _ a ...
0
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1answer
90 views

'of' or 'by' or 'from'

I have a sentence that contains the phrase We support products of different manufacturers [...] Is the use of 'of' correct there? A coworker said I should use 'by' and I also can think of 'from' as ...
1
vote
1answer
93 views

The use of “for” with the verb “to crave”

My gut feeling tells me one says "I crave chocolate" and not "I crave for chocolate". This was confirmed for example at this forum discussion. However, google also showed me the sentence "I crave for ...
5
votes
1answer
86 views

Why “on the books”, not “in the books”

On the books means "part of the law". These changes would add little to the civil rights laws now on the books. I know the meaning of this idiom, and idioms are used as they are, but idioms ...
0
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1answer
74 views

When you have a sentence containing a list separated by commas, do you need to repeat the verb before a preposition?

I.E. Which of these is correct? A. You are cool, funny, and among the most popular of students at this school. B. You are cool, funny, and are among the most popular of students at this school. ...