Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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3
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3answers
45 views

Is this statement grammatically correct - “I have spent too long confusing nice for good”

My confusion is whether the right way of writing this would be "confused X with Y" or "confused X for Y"
0
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2answers
41 views

'in search for/of true love?'

I need to update my fb status: in search for true love or in search of true love Which one is grammatically correct ?
1
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2answers
31 views

Different from x Different to x Different than

In the following sentence: "When I visited my old school after so many years, it looked completely different in the classrooms and the backyard /from what/to what/than/ it had been when I was a ...
3
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2answers
59 views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
0
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3answers
68 views

What does “match X against Y” mean?

I just read a post that says: When Angular bootstraps your application, the HTML compiler traverses the DOM matching directives against the DOM elements. What does "match... against" mean? How ...
0
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1answer
26 views

Concurrently with or Sequentially To/Sequentially With?

Drug A is administered concurrently with or sequentially to Drug B. I want to say in a formal manner that Drug A and Drug B are administered either at the same time or at different times, but I ...
1
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2answers
37 views

On vs At with date and time

This must be a simple question for a native speaker. I know that we use "on" with dates: I'll see you on January 1st. And we use "at" with times: I'll see you at 17:30. But what preposition has to ...
0
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0answers
12 views

“To the satisfaction of” or “With the satisfaction of”? [on hold]

Just want to ask about the usage of satisfaction. Is To the satisfaction of bosses or public correct or with the satisfaction of the bosses or public?
0
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0answers
28 views

“On the equivalence of A and B” or “between A and B”

I am writing an academic paper with a choice of titles: On the equivalence of A and B On the equivalence between A and B or On the equivalence of A, B and C On the equivalence ...
1
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3answers
36 views

Tolerance for or to

Which is the correct statement: adopt zero tolerance "for" or "to" discrimination in the workplace?
1
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3answers
54 views

Infinitive of purpose or “for verb-ing”

The chambers inside the pyramid were closed (to/for) visitors (to clean and repair/for cleaning and repairing). Which is the correct alternative in both the brackets, and why? Please explain in ...
-1
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2answers
68 views

Can I use “contend” without a preposition?

On the one hand, recent advances in the power of computers have been decried as the nemesis of whatever vestiges of our privacy still survive. On the other, the Internet is acclaimed as a Utopia. ...
2
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2answers
54 views

“onto” versus “on to”

Should the single word onto or the two words on to be used here? She held onto the cushion instead of holding onto the metal frame. She was grabbing onto the seat cushion. There's nothing ...
-1
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0answers
18 views

Introduction provides background TO / of the problem? [closed]

I am not sure which one to use: This introduction provides a "background to" or "background of" the problem behind the thesis... ?
0
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1answer
48 views

Can a noun be supported by 2 prepositions?

See this sentence: Partner A will have a contract with our company with following missions:... It can be written into two separate sentences: Partner A will have a contract with our ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

What's the right preposition to use with the verb “enroll”?

The dictionary says that one enrolls in a university, but today I heard a person saying "The student enrolled at the school." Is it right? Can I use both the prepositions "in" and "at"?
2
votes
1answer
34 views

Is “available for the world” OK? [duplicate]

I've just put a new web page live, and now one of my sentences is bugging me. The sentence in question is: It was developed internally and made available for the world. The part that I'm not ...
0
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1answer
20 views

Is one of them wrong? “Working at a new job” vs. “Working in a new job” [duplicate]

Can "at" and "in" be used interchangeably without worry or is one of them specifically wrong especially in the case of: Working at a new job vs. Working in a new job? and Living in a new apartment ...
0
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0answers
26 views

“for + noun phrase” vs “of + noun phrase”

presumptive (adj) 1.1 Law Giving grounds for the inference of a fact or of the appropriate interpretation of the law. Would someone please explain why of precedes the second noun phrase (the ...
0
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2answers
49 views

Which preposition to use in “lack of knowledge __ the manager”

The preposition by is faulty in this sentence but I don't know which preposition I have to replace it with. The inaccurate planning is caused by the lack or insufficient presence of relevant ...
4
votes
2answers
100 views

“as to + verb” vs “to + verb”

Are there any differences between these two forms? Example: "It has been done so as + to make it easier for academics and other judges to refer to a particular passage in a judicial ...
1
vote
1answer
64 views

Use “of” or “for” with Institute, Department, Office…?

When should which be used and what's the difference? Department of XYZ or Department for XYZ Institute of ABC or Institute for ABC Federal Office of... or Federal Office for... Is there any sort ...
3
votes
1answer
43 views

'Off of' versus 'from' [duplicate]

Is 'off of' ever a valid substitution for 'from'? For example, 'It's that guy off of Friends.' Would it ever be acceptable to use this construction in formal written English? I live in the ...
0
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1answer
22 views

Should the preposition 'by' be used before all the gerunds if there are more than one? [duplicate]

Is this grammatically and syntactically correct? … by a) studying and b) helping – or should it be: … a) by studying and b) by helping
0
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2answers
86 views

What's the grammatical object of “at” in “at 2-0 down”?

At 2-0 down with ten minutes left, you have to go for broke. This is a structure at odds with what most learners know. Prepositions take nominals as objects, but here, what's the supposed object ...
0
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0answers
19 views

Clauses ending with prepositions [duplicate]

I often hear the rule, "Don't end a sentence with a preposition." As long as we ignore the prepositions in phrasal verbs, it makes sense that an object should follow a preposition. By the same logic, ...
0
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1answer
29 views

“before/after that” as a preposition

In some older English texts I have stumbled on phrases where the word "that" is used as part of a preposition. Here are some examples from the KJV Bible: Deuteronomy 9:4 Speak not thou in thine ...
2
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2answers
176 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
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4answers
108 views

To climb (in) the rankings?

When competing in a contest, is your goal: To climb the rankings or To climb in the rankings ?
0
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2answers
55 views

Is it “restricted to” or “restricted from”? [closed]

I came across this sentence: The power to rule was restricted to ministers, and it was restricted from king. What is the difference between "restricted to" and "restricted from" here?
0
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3answers
39 views

Which preposition is used with tolerance in this sentence?

I want to use the word tolerance in the context of infectious diseases. This sentence: The immune response will mediate either clearance or tolerance preposition infections. In other words, ...
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3answers
33 views

Usage of “Between” [closed]

Mr. Rao will meet the candidates who cleared the test between 9.00 AM ____ 3:00 PM. What is more appropriate here? to/and/till/upto? Also can you brief upon the usage of "between"?
2
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2answers
48 views

“On/over the phone” [closed]

Which version is correct? As discussed with you over the phone. As discussed with you on the phone.
0
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0answers
22 views

Preposition with 'line' when quoting from a text (prose or poetry) with numbered lines? [duplicate]

When referring to a line or lines in/from (?) a text with numbered lines, is it "the idea expressed in line 25 is such and such"; "in line 25, the word 'lisp' is a clear indication that…" or "the ...
1
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1answer
34 views

“is to” or “is how to”?

Is it better to say "is to" or "is how to"? For example: A challenging problem is to analyse the runtime effects. or should it be: A challenging problem is how to analyse the runtime ...
6
votes
2answers
292 views

What does “as” represent for in “Cantor quits as Majority leader” and “Cantor to resign as Majority leader”?

Today’s New York Times reported Eric Canter’s defeat in Primary election in Virginia under the headline: “Eric Cantor to step down as House Majority leader” followed by the text copy: “Representative ...
2
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3answers
79 views

Calculation by, by means of, through, from

Which of the following sentences regarding the calculation of something should be preferred? The calculation of the result by this equation... The calculation of the result by means of this ...
0
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1answer
44 views

“solve with” vs “solve for”

I would like to get a clarification whether I do understand and use those two phrases correctly or not. The context is solving a mathematical problem. solved with sth - means a problem is tackled ...
0
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0answers
20 views

“Due to” vs. ”Because of” [duplicate]

I would please like to know which of the following sentences is the more accurate, and why that is so: Due to recent economic problems, it has been difficult for many to find a job. Because of ...
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1answer
46 views

Is “At which address should I come?” correct?

The sentence is, At which address should I come? Which preposition should be used? Can I use "on"?
0
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2answers
55 views

Schedule in the next week

Which one is correct? I'd like to schedule a meeting with you [in/for/no preposition] the next week.
3
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1answer
54 views

Why would you call “before” a preposition when it precedes a clause?

I'm new here & don't know all the etiquette & ins & outs, but I have a question about something posted in another thread. Modern grammar, however, recognises that prepositions can take ...
0
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2answers
48 views

Use of the word Refrained

'The experience of negative emotions in the flow of life can never be stopped, only refrained!' Is this sentence grammatically wrong since the preposition 'from' does not follow the word refrained?
0
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3answers
50 views

When should you use “to” following a “why”?

I've always wondered why some people add a to after Why when framing a question. I have always wished to know this, but I keep forgetting to ask and today I came across a tweet that made me post this ...
2
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1answer
64 views

“nervous about” and “nervous of”

While going over the correct prepositions to use with adjectives, I came across a situation I can't define. I'm using a Longman dictionary and a Cambridge grammar, but neither defines the difference ...
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3answers
115 views

Is a movie played in a theater or at a theater?

Do we say a movie is being played in a theater or at a theater?
25
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9answers
3k views

Beer is made ___ yeast, water, hops, and malted barley

Which is the correct answer to fill in the gap in "Beer is made ____ yeast, water, hops and malted barley"? of from with out of I am leaning toward '2'. "Made from" can be used to describe a ...
1
vote
1answer
39 views

“Sleep through a single night” vs. “sleep a single night”

For the next two weeks he did not sleep through a single night. Can we recast the sentence as follows? For the next two weeks he did not sleep a single night. That is, is the use of through ...
1
vote
2answers
41 views

“In here” or only “here” [closed]

I would use here with no preposition, like I wish you are here. They are coming here. However talking to a well-educated British woman I noted she would put an in before here. Since then I only ...
0
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1answer
38 views

Replacing “to” and other prepositions [closed]

One of the requirements of my English final includes removing all prepositions from a previously written essay. I'm having trouble getting rid of prepositions like "to", "in", "of", and other common ...