Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in". The meaning of a sentence can be dramatically altered by choosing the wrong preposition.

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Can we use “splash” instead of “throw water”?

Can we use "splash" instead of "threw water" in this sentence? People laughed freely like small children as they "threw water" at each other. Also, do we use the preposition "at" for "splash"?
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Preposition in money orders

If I want to say that my nephew is the sender of the money order to the embassy, should I say "I sent your embassy a money order in my nephew's name?" If not what should I say to show that the sender ...
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37 views

In the tube or on the tube?

If I would like to ask, if someone reads the news on / in the tube? (btw Tube being the underground in London) Which one is correct? Thanks,
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1answer
37 views

Difference between for and of

Is it 1. The renewal dates of the books 2. The renewal dates for the books
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2answers
49 views

“Log in” or “Log on”? [duplicate]

What is correct? He was logging on to the Bitrack database. He was logging in to the Bitrack database. Please note a password is required to log on/in to the database.
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4answers
38 views

What's the usage of “Unlike like, say …, …”?

In the following sentence and context, do Lego and Emoji have underlying rights to be purchased? Unlike like, say Lego, there are also no underlying rights here to purchase, which makes this as ...
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2answers
38 views

To or Towards…?

Can 'to' be replaced with/used interchangeably with 'towards' in an essay to make myself sound more sophisticated or are there linguistical complications associated with using it everywhere? If so, ...
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1answer
27 views

passive form of “recruit” followed by “in” or “into”

A total of 100 patients were recruited ___ the study. Do I have to say recruited into the study or recruited in the study?
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24 views

For ‘such as’, why was ‘as’ used and not ‘that’?

such (adj.) c. 1200, Old English swylc, swilc "just as, as, in like manner; as if, as though; such a one, he" (pronoun and adjective), from a Proto-Germanic compound * swalikaz "so formed" ...
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2answers
40 views

Can I use “within” in place of “before” in “I will go there before 7 p.m.”? [on hold]

I will go there before 7 p.m. Can I use "within 7 p.m." in this sentence ? Or would it be wrong to use "within"?
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1answer
33 views

Question about the sentence “The child stroked the cat under the table”

I'm reading a book talking about prepositions in English. The following sentence is from it. The child stroked the cat under the table The author told us that "under the table" is modifying ...
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31 views

Do scenarios hover?

I was recently editing a document produced by a consulting firm. I came across the sentence: Under this scenario, Kazakhstan can expect to secure its energy sector. I quickly replaced under with ...
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2answers
142 views

Applied to the lottery or for the lottery? [on hold]

Which preposition should I use in the following sentence: I applied ____ greencard lottery. Would it be: I applied for the greencard lottery. or I applied to the greencard lottery. ...
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2answers
48 views

Is it “in the episode” or “on the episode”? [on hold]

Which one is correct "in the episode" or "on the episode"? If I talk about a specific episode do I have to use "on" like "on episode 40"? Is that correct?
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4answers
44 views

Need help with a convoluted sentence

I'm trying to simplify this sentence, but I can't figure out how. The string of "was when even after" makes it sound very odd, especially when you read it out loud. The most unusual situation I ...
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2answers
36 views

Can we use “around about” like this? [on hold]

Can we use "around about" together as in the following sentence? The building was built around about 2 years ago.
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1answer
31 views

Which one is correct: “after a century of” or “after a century from”?

I have two sentences: The Solvay conference, after a century of the first one, brought all the physics geniuses together once again. The Solvay conference, after a century from the first ...
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1answer
53 views

Does “differ by” even exist? [on hold]

I have a question about the preposition for differ in the following context: A differs B merely from a chemical element. Or better to say: A differs B by a chemical element. I will ...
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2answers
42 views

What preposition is used with “amend”?

What preposition is used with "amend"? For example, A client wrote down the address to send a document, but she wrote "UK" as a country name instead of "US". In this case, If I say that you should ...
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0answers
7 views

Is “except she's beautiful” correct? [migrated]

I was writing something here about a girl and I wanted to say something like "she's a normal person, except she's beautiful", like in French "sauf qu'elle est belle"... I'm not quite sure this is ...
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2answers
65 views

“…the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK” [duplicate]

After the second world war, the city of Berlin was divided ________ the USSR, the USA and the UK. Options by with between among My Approach: I am not able to solve this ...
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4answers
60 views

The use of preposition in this case

Do I always need a preposition when I say.. "I traveled (in) NY?" Can I simply say, "I traveled NY"?
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0answers
44 views

Preposition: Within vs In

Is there a distinction between "within" and "in" as in, "upon finding a violation within the preceding four years" versus "upon finding a violation in the preceding four years"?
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1answer
49 views

“To X and Y” OR “to X and to Y”

I would like to know which one is correct? I went both to Yangon and Mandalay. Or I went both to Yangon and to Mandalay.
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34 views

Can I treat “after” in this sentence as a conjunction instead of a preposition?

I met up a choice question recently: The boy dived into the water and after ___ seemed to be a long time, he came up again. A.what B.that C.it D.which The answer says A is correct. According ...
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1answer
31 views

“definition” or “defining” (of the)? [closed]

Which one is best: Defining of the settings is enabled when... Defining settings is enabled when... Definition of the settings is enabled when... (some other form) ?
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1answer
38 views

Correct preposition for 'workplace'

Should I say Eating is not allowed in the workplace or Eating is not allowed at the workplace when eating is, in fact, not allowed anywhere near the PC in an office?
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2answers
49 views

the use of “by” and “to” [closed]

I can't distinguish between the use of by and to when putting them in such sentence: House prices had risen by/to 0.3 % in July". Especially the meaning of by.
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1answer
60 views

Which is best, “to access” or “of access”?

When describing someone who is reclusive is it better to say: He was difficult to access. or He was difficult of access.
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1answer
35 views

Between 'decide' and 'an object', are prepositions like 'on, upon, about' extraneous?

Caution: This question concerns the verb 'direct' followed immediately afterwards by an object. To ameliorate readability, I eschew the use of blockquotes below, where I quoted the OED. [Source:] ...
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41 views

“Enquire from someone” vs “enquire with someone”

Which is the correct sentence from these two? Can you enquire from her? Can you enquire with her? I tried to search the internet but most results talk about the difference between ...
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1answer
38 views

“Rise in” vs. “rise of”

What’s the difference between "rise in" and "rise of"? Specifically, I am looking at the sentence: The rise __ juvenile crime is attributed to three factors. Which preposition should I choose?
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3answers
77 views

Preposition in vs. of

Which is correct; "in" poverty or "of" poverty? The children have survived 10 years of poverty. or The children have survived 10 years in poverty. Thank you!
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1answer
28 views

Use of “and” in “This line connects point A to Point B”

Dictionaries say when two things are connected or linked, the prepositions to use are “to” and “with” (e.g. “This line connects point A to Point B” and “The train links Paris with London”). Would you ...
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2answers
310 views

'With' vs 'by' - where to use these two preposition in an English sentence?

I am confused with use of word with or by in a sentence. For example, if I say: The letter was written with ball pen. this is correct. And if in another sentence I say: The letter ...
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2answers
39 views

About the word 'aurora': which time preposition to use?

Aurora, in poetic language, means dawn, according to some dictionaries. How commonly is it used to indicate time? I've mostly encountered by dawn and in the morning and was wondering if that's the ...
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1answer
36 views

Why is the preposition apparently optional in this sentence?

I encountered the following sentence: "...contains the majority of information required to build a project in just the way you want." It occurred to me that the sentence sounds completely ...
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2answers
64 views

Can I use “of” to mean “caused by”?

For instance, can I say: I'm not sure if it was a deception of the moon, but the field looked brown. In this case, "deception of the moon" means "illusion caused by the moon". Is it common to ...
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2answers
71 views

Why do they use “in” like random in the sentences?

How can I understand the usage of in which comes after have in the sentence below? From Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes in A Study in Scarlett, Chapter 3: There still remained some ...
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Usage of “from” in the given sentence

I was reading about the Los Caprichos collection by Goya and specifically one sentence drew my attention: "the innumerable foibles and follies to be found in any civilized society, and from the ...
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1answer
45 views

Is “Deals you'll want to tell everyone” correct?

We have a VW billboard in here Melbourne advertising Deals you'll want to tell everyone It's a fairly big-budget campaign so I assume the grammar has been thought out, but it just sounds off to ...
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1answer
46 views

“Curious as to who” vs. “curious of who”

I'm curious as to who you are. I'm curious of who you are. The person is anonymous and I'm just wondering who it is.
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1answer
46 views

How to use “in respective of” and how does it compare to “in terms of”? [closed]

How to use the expression "in respective of" and how does it compare to "in terms of"? What is their appropriate usage?
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2answers
184 views

At, by, in the end of this week

I have the following three sentences: I am reading it by the end of this week. I am reading it at the end of this week. I am reading it in the end of this week. Which one is more grammatically ...
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40 views

What part of speech is “on” in the phrase “Bring it on home (to me)”?

If I had to guess I'd say it's an adverb, modifying the verb "bring," but it seems like it could also be interpreted as a preposition with "home" as the object. Both? Neither? Thanks for any help.
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1answer
22 views

Prepositions usage: In vs For

There is a topic for a scientific paper in which I think the usage of the preposition "In" is incorrect; that is: Admissible Observation Operators in a Flexible Beam Technically, we can ...
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3answers
83 views

to have fun “on a journey” vs “in a journey”

Richard Branson in an interview with Motivated magazine was quoted as saying: To have fun in [my] journey through life and learn from [my] mistakes. Source: PERSONAL MISSION STATEMENTS OF 5 ...
3
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1answer
151 views

Why at the school not at school

In the following sentence why is it at the school not at school? They don't have to do their homework today because it's a holiday at the school.
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1answer
28 views

Preposition for “same” [closed]

I've seen some sentences online that use the expression, "the same of" in place of "the same as". Do these two expressions mean the same as each other? If not, can someone please explain how to use ...
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“I wish for a rest now”: what does “now” modify?

Consider this sentence: I am truly amazed by my success at this diagramming business, but I wish for a rest now. I think that the adverb "now" modifies "rest". But according to the answer page, ...