Prepositions are function words like "to", "over", "through", "in".

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“Provided to us” or “Provided us”?

Both the sentences/fragments below appear to be grammatical. Thanks for the help you have provided to us in the planning Thanks for the help you have provided us in the planning Is there ...
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333 views

Should I say “She is in the park or She is at the park”? [migrated]

I am really confused which one is correct. She is in/at the park, They are at/in the park, or I am in/at the park? I'm an Asian trying to learn English. I really need your help. Thanks in advance!
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12 views

Difference between cause of and cause for [migrated]

Could someone please tell me whether to use of or for in the sentence given below:- Inactivity is the greatest cause of/for overweight. Please also explain the logic used to make the distinction.
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33 views

At Up To together in a sentence?

Does it make sense to say "At Up To 30% off"? Shouldn't it either be "At" or "Up To"...not "At Up To"?
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31 views

in a computer vs on a computer [duplicate]

Important information can be stored in a computer vs Important information can be stored on a computer Also, can we use stored and saved alternatively/interchangebaly with computer. E.g. ...
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2answers
59 views

preposition “travel in” or “travel by” [duplicate]

Which is the grammatically correct statement : "We are travelling in a car" Or "We are travelling by a car" Thanks in advance...
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26 views

Recommended sources for understanding the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions

Can anyone recommend to me a good book and any other sources where I can study in detail the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions? Since I am a visual learner, I would love to find ...
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32 views

What is the spatial difference between in and on [migrated]

.....that I received in my email or .....that I received on my email What is the correct preposition in the example above? What is the "spatial" difference between these two prepositions when apply ...
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30 views

What is the right way: “It's better for me to talk BY \ ON \ or without nothing here- English” [migrated]

What is the right way: "It's better for me to talk BY \ ON English" or to say simply "It's better for me to talk English" without any prepositions?
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20 views

Can I say “Hiking the Lighthouse/Mountain/Jones Path”?

If there is a path called the Lighthouse Path (somewhere at the coast) or Mountain Path or Jones Path (named after somebody who identified it) and I want to hike it, is it correct to say "Hiking the ...
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Use of final “s” in -word endings: which words in AmE are correct?

DFW said [0]: The preposition towards is British usage; the US spelling is toward ... Except for backwards and afterwards, no preposition ending in –word takes a final s in US usage." Is that ...
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26 views

There is an advantage in/of doing [something]

I know that they usually say "there is an advantage in/to doing [something]" - at least, it's stated in my grammar book. But I am wondering whether it's possible to use the preposition "of" in this ...
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2answers
65 views

Can one talk “with” someone?

The verb talk usually has to preceding its complement/object: (I) I talked to him about his misbehavior. Is it idiomatic (and/or grammatical) to use with instead? (II) I talked with him about ...
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5answers
89 views

Alternative to “thankful for”

I do not like using the phrase "remember all that we are thankful for" because of the preposition at the end; however, it is a common phrase at this time of year. Finagling the sentence to avoid ...
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2answers
113 views

What does “She is tall for her age” mean?

I read the following sentence She is tall for her age. Now I'm greatly confused about its meaning. Does it mean "she would have as long age as she is tall" (perhaps showing prediction) Or ...
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1answer
53 views

how to use “click” for the “lines” of a text box [closed]

In the following sentence I have some problem using prepositions related to click, empty. Please click an empty line in the textbox From the sentence above I want to say the user to ...
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1answer
38 views

“Classify data in A/B/C by value x by using the function x”

This is about data classification done by computer. Data is classified into the A, B, or C rank and then the judgement result will be displayed on the screen. All the transaction is done by using ...
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1answer
47 views

Uncommon uses of the preposition 'with'

It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions: Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And ...
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22 views

“It had now been two weeks since he had left the house” [migrated]

It had now been two weeks since he had left the house. Is this use of since correct? Is the tense of the verb after it correct?
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462 views

Ending a sentence with a preposition? [duplicate]

Recently in an episode of 'House of cards' they bring up the joke "Two freshmen girls are moving into their dorm room together. One of them's from Georgia, one of them's from Connecticut. The girl ...
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1answer
37 views

Is one preposition enough for multiple months?

A colleague of mine has written her thesis and requested me to read and correct its grammar. I have seen some sentences like The maximum deviation of the concentration values were obtained in the ...
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2answers
61 views

When describing living space/floor space, how should I read/say NxZ meters?

Suppose I want to say something like: "This room is 6 x 5 meters" What word should I use to read the "x" between the two numbers? In Russian it would be "на", and in French "sur". Translating these ...
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1answer
48 views

“at a URL” or “on a URL”? [duplicate]

I have to write "you can find ... on http://www.blablabla.com". But I am unsure, if I should write "on" or "at". May anybody help me with that?
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18 views

“Hospital at ABC City” vs. “hospital in ABC City” [duplicate]

My city has two dental hospitals, a national one and a municipal one. My country also has a second national dental hospital located in the capital (not my city). Both go by the name "National ...
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1answer
31 views

“Four times greater chance” vs. “four times greater of a chance”

Researchers from Finland's National Research and Development Center for Welfare and Health discovered that women who participate in an abortion have four times greater chance of dying in the ...
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3answers
52 views

What is the difference between in the ground and on the ground

He is playing in the playground. He is playing on the playground. Can you tell me the difference between the two expression above?
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2answers
356 views

to be between apartments

When somebody says that somebody else is between apartments, what do they mean? Take this sentence as an example: My brother lives in Chicago. At the moment he’s between apartments, so he‘s living ...
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86 views

How to use the word “on”

Is the statement "Jennifer is on the front row." grammatically correct? I was told that this statement is incorrect because Jennifer cannot get on top of the row but she can get in the row. Please ...
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26 views

Different positions of using 'be' in the phrase 'would be' in a sentence

I am reading a book by Gavin Esler and in one part he writes this sentence. If you excised these twenty or so words from the speeches of David Cameron, Tony Blair, or most political or business ...
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34 views

correct use of “it” [closed]

Someone just told me that writing "it makes me happy" is incorrect in its sense not in grammatical aspect because "it" is "not human" please help me, is it okay to write "it" with "happy"? I am ...
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19 views

“All of Europe” [duplicate]

Is the use of preposition "of" correct in this sentence? Within five weeks all [of] Europe was at war.
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39 views

Being a representative for someone to/against (?) others

I'm currently writing a job applications for customer-centric jobs and I would like to say that "I'm looking forward to being a representative for the wishes and needs of a community of customers to / ...
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1answer
32 views

prepositions - “increase of” vs “increase in”

Which one is correct or if both are correct, is there any difference? The change is a 10 percent increase of tuition The change is a 10 percent increase in tuition
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How to say that i'm using Linux? [migrated]

I want to say that i work using OS Linux. In Russia we say "I work UNDER Linux" or "I work IN Linux". And how is correct the same phrase in English?
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60 views

The use of preposition “of”

What is the difference between: 1. Design of a system vs. System Design 2. Type of cable vs. Cable type 3. Certificate of Compliance vs. Compliance Certificate 4. Obligations and Duties of Company ...
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43 views

“A teaching assistant in/of/for Applied Quantitative Methods”

I am a Teaching Assistant in/of/for Applied Quantitative Methods Which preposition is correct this context? And why?
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82 views

Is it improper to say “count till a hundred”? [closed]

I'm told that using count till a hundred is improper grammar. What's the correct preposition?
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28 views

Use of “off/off of” in speech [duplicate]

Why do Americans say off of when they tell someone to get off them?
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60 views

Should “listening” always be followed by the preposition “to”?

While we always add a preposition to with listen, as in listen to music, does that apply with listening as well? Is the following sentence correct? I am habitual of listening this from you ?
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37 views

“For three years” vs “in three years” [duplicate]

I haven't talked to my wife for three years. I haven't talked to my wife in three years. Are in and for interchangeable in these sentences?
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1answer
44 views

“At the most difficult times” or “in the most difficult times”

In the example below which preposition is appropriate: at or in? Family will be there for you [at/in] the most difficult times no matter what.
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2answers
164 views

“At/on/in railway station”

Which preposition is correct? Now I am at/on/in the railway station.
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27 views

“headquarters of” vs. “headquarters for”… is there a difference?

Is there a difference between "headquarters of" and "headquarters for"? It is the headquarters of many branches. It is the headquarters for many branches. It is the headquarters of the party. It is ...
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29 views

What preposition should follow the adjective “parallel”?

When using the word parallel in communicating the state of being in a relationship between one line and another, what is the correct word to follow parallel? parallel to parallel with
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1answer
99 views

Can 'to' in 'to + verb' be an adverb?

The 'to infinitive' has the structure to + verb as in to go, to eat, to ride, etc. The word 'to' is thought to be a preposition. However, since a preposition needs an object and a verb cannot be an ...
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1answer
65 views

Does “send” require a “to”? [duplicate]

Is the following grammatical? Should I send the letter to her? If it is, then how come that send can also be used without to? Should I send her the letter? What about the use of send in a ...
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123 views

“I belong to a greater stage”

Is it okay to say: I believe I belong to a greater stage. Basically, I want to say that I want to transit from my current position to a better one since I think I am skillful enough for the ...
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1answer
60 views

Is there any difference between “immune from” and “immune against” in the following sentence?

"His position as president renders him immune ..... criticism." Any subtle difference concerning the viability and efficacy of criticism, according to the preposition used? The Ngram shows ...
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3answers
62 views

Can we say “admitted to the mistakes”?

Can we say "admitted to the mistakes"? I think it should be admitted the mistakes and admitted to the hospital. The sentence that I am working on is it has not admitted to the mistakes in the ...
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36 views

Non-Adverbial “as is”

I know the common adverbial usage of "as is" as in, Leave it as is. As a non-native English speaker I found a strange-to-me but common English usage of non-adverbial "as is" and sometimes also "as ...