Questions about prepositional phrases.

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Get a contact to or on somebody

I have a pickle. A student of mine asked me to check his email in which he said: 'Here's contact to Mr. XYZ.' I didn't find it wrong, but than his colleagues suggested: 'Contact on Mr. ...
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352 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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27 views

Comma usage and the phrase type

I was doing this online quiz and came across a compound sentence. The first sentence is this: The soccer team celebrated its victory *by going to Disneyland*. My question is what kind of phrases is ...
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137 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
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249 views

When is it appropriate to use a comma before “which”, “with”, and “who”?

Is it appropriate to use a comma before which in the following sentence? The group has helped me to make new friends and become more independent, which has increased my self-confidence. Is it ...
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29 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
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24 views

How would one specify that Noun 2 in “[Prepositional phrase] [Noun 1] and [Noun 2]” is not an object of the prepositional phrase?

I will give an example of this problem. In fact, this example is the reason why I am asking! I am blending a quote taken from a book into an assignment on which I am currently working. (Don't worry, I ...
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29 views

“But from” or “But rather from”?

Which one is more grammatically correct? But from or But rather from? I don't quite understand which one should be used. And I seriously doubt that the second one can be used at all. It didn't ...
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27 views

“From A to Z” and other corresponding prepositional phrases

Certain prepositional phrases seem to correspond to each other in the same way that correlative conjunctions do, but I've never heard of any grammar that relates two PPs. He traveled from France to ...
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52 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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38 views

Do scenarios hover?

I was recently editing a document produced by a consulting firm. I came across the sentence: Under this scenario, Kazakhstan can expect to secure its energy sector. I quickly replaced under with ...
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172 views

prepositions “in” and “at” with school subjects

I came across a phrase: "My brother is first in Maths" Is it possible to say "he is first at Maths" instead of "he is first in Maths"? I thought that I should say "at" when I speak about somebody's ...
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64 views

PP in NP: complements or adjuncts?

Can you help me to find what function/relation these components(italicised) hold to the head noun(bold-faced)? the benefit of running 5k everyday the results of being a single mom Are they ...
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Function of “about”- practised physiotherapy for about 6 months

I practised physiotherapy for about 6 months. I understand that "about" can take forms such as an adv, adj, preposition. Though I can rephrase the sentence, however, I am curious to find out ...
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82 views

Recommended sources for understanding the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions

Can anyone recommend to me a good book and any other sources where I can study in detail the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions? Since I am a visual learner, I would love to find ...