Questions about prepositional phrases.

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1answer
23 views

Of course I don't! - comma needed or not

All the time I see people replying with "of course I will" or "yes it is!" (to "it's not that good" and not placing a comma after "of course" and "yes". The second case seems even more extreme, as ...
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0answers
62 views

Are these two prepositional phrases disjuncts or something else?

Are these two prepositional phrases disjuncts or something else? I’ve looked through Biber and Huddleston, and the two examples don’t seem to fit into any of their categories of disjuncts. Thanks in ...
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1answer
47 views

Ambiguity in prepositional phrases

"Nellie washed the dishes in the sink." This sentence is ambiguous, and the prepositional phrase can be read two ways--either as 'Nellie washed (in the sink) the dishes', in which case it is an ...
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2answers
35 views

“Study in” or “study on”?

I'm reading this journal article and I keep seeing "in a study in malaria patients..." I think it should be "study on" or even "study among". There's also "In a study of adult men in participants ...
2
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1answer
31 views

Why do we say on the team and not in the team? [duplicate]

What is it about the word "team" that makes it uniquely take the preposition "on" ? And yet, the word "club" is similar in meaning; and we can be in a club.
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1answer
43 views

“But from” or “But rather from”?

Which one is more grammatically correct? But from or But rather from? I don't quite understand which one should be used. And I seriously doubt that the second one can be used at all. It didn't ...
0
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1answer
28 views

Prepositions with the verb “ask”: “ask questions from,” “ask a question to”

"What questions do they ask a communication trainer?" or "What questions do they ask from a communication trainer?" Also, I know "She asked me a question" is what's generally used but just have a ...
4
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3answers
43 views

Will prepositional verbs always prevent us from moving the preposition to the middle of a sentence?

I'm bringing this question because I'm not sure whether a preposition in the end of a sentence can be moved to the middle, especially considering prepositional verbs. Also, I'd like to know which ...
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2answers
49 views

How about Sunday vs How about on Sunday?

"How about" are followed by nouns, clauses or Verb+ing. But is it grammatically correct to say "How about on Sunday?" I got more results Googling "How about on Sunday?" than "How about Sunday?" Which ...
3
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1answer
48 views

sentence structure: Why is the subject placed in the end of this sentence?

While I was reading a Barron's book, I saw this sentence. Its structure is not as what I always knew, but it seemed much more beautiful to me. "Along with the rise of agricultural societies came ...
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0answers
24 views

The use of prepositions plus “which” [migrated]

How to use "in which", "by which", "of which", "on which", and "for which"? What are the differences among those? Are there any other combinations of preposition and the word "which"? I have ...
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3answers
20k views

difference between “engage with someone” and “engage someone”?

What is the difference between "engaging with someone" and "engaging someone"? For example, what is the difference between these two expressions: How do you engage with your employees? How do you ...
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0answers
35 views

In what way do these adverbial prepositional phrases modify the verb?

Adverbial prepositional phrases usually answer one of these questions: when, how, where, and why. Furthermore, if the phrase is movable it’s a good sign that the phrase is adverbial. I am also aware ...
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1answer
16 views

'On a system' versus 'in a system'

I was wondering if anyone here could help me with this. I had submitted a written IT proposal to a senior member of the team that I am part of, and she corrected the usage of the word 'on' in the ...
1
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1answer
21 views

Mentor as a verb [duplicate]

If someone is serving as my mentor, are they mentoring me AT something or FOR something? I posed a question to someone else asking what a 3rd party could potentially mentor me at, hence the question
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2answers
20 views

Sides to the argument?

Is it correct to say "There are two sides to the argument"? I know "two sides of the argument" is definitely grammatically correct, but the former also feels right and has a different emphasis. And if ...
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2answers
394 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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0answers
29 views

Divide or Divide it Up: Which is correct in the following context?

They divided the money up among their three children. They divided the money among their three children. Is there anything wrong in my second sentence?!!
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1answer
94 views

“Because/because of/owing to/on account of/due to”? [closed]

I was doing my homework but I'm stuck on this exercise. The instructions say: Complete these sentences: (my answers are in brackets) “Don’t be fool; the dog’s dancing was … the extremely hot ...
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5answers
110 views

“With tiredness and underperformance the result” - Two adjacent noun phrases

Does anyone know what sort of grammar rule is applied in this sentence (the bold part)? I've never seen this before: ... something we should all spend roughly one-third of our time doing, but ...
1
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0answers
24 views

Can the verb 'be' be modified by a prepositional phrase?

There's a question about whether it's possible to modify the verb be, but the main focus there is on modification by adverbs, not prepositional phrases. I found some legitimate instances of be ...
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0answers
92 views

Commas with multiple prepositional (adverbial) phrases at the end of the sentence on the ground of restrictive/non-restrictive modifier

Do we put commas between 2 or more prepositional phrases that immediately follow each other at the end of the main clause if all of them modify/restrict the main predicate differently (e.g. one ...
4
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1answer
84 views

“frightened 'by' spiders” vs. “frightened 'of' spiders” in AmEng

Could you explain the difference between these two sentences: I'm frightened BY spiders. I'm frightened OF spiders. Obviously both are used in American English in the sense "have a fear ...
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1answer
38 views

Does the “rule of the last antecedent” apply to casual conversation?

The Supreme Court recently decided Lockhart v United States using the rule that a limiting clause or phrase . . . should ordinarily be read as modifying only the noun or phrase that it ...
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2answers
62 views

Omitting articles in nouns - prepositions; after; to; before; from

Why is the indefinite article omitted here? Could it be the definite article, but omitted? Like in the following case in an instruction: Grasp drumstick. Place knife between thigh and body; cut ...
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2answers
28 views

Are commas necessary/helpful for this prepositional phrase?

Consider these sentences: 1) "To date, only one HIV vaccine trial (RV144) has successfully elicited a protective immune response, and in this trial protection was weak and short-lived." 2) "To date, ...
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3answers
55 views

to be spelled as or to be spelled by?

What is the correct preposition to use with the verb "to spell"? I'm trying to write a sentence "this sound is usually spelled by the letter "e". I'm not sure if I should say "by the letter "e" or "as ...
2
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2answers
176 views

Burden TO or ON some one/thing?

I'm struggling with the word "burden" used in a phrase: whether it should be followed by the word "on" or "to." It might be obvious to some of you, but I am not a native speaker. Or maybe there is ...
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3answers
4k views

Sentences start with Of

What is the meaning of of when it starts a sentence? For example, and what is the grammatically correct way to write a sentence starting with of?
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2answers
10k views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
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0answers
62 views

Nowhere near and nowhere close to

I am so confused about which is modifying which. In the sentence below: It was nowhere close to being done. Nowhere: An adverb modifying close It's the farthest I could get. I don't know if ...
30
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3answers
198k views

“Consist in” vs. “consist of”

I would like to clarify this once and for all: What is the correct use of "consist in" vs. "consist of"? "Meditation consists in/of attentive watchfulness." "The body consists in/of cells." ...
7
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4answers
398 views

Ambiguous syntax tree and phrase structure rules

I’m studying for a final for my English Linguistics class and going through example sentences that we should be able to draw syntax trees for. The sentence He looked at the dog with one eye was marked ...
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2answers
80 views

What does this “it” refer to?

Furthermore, Gilbert’s vibrant description of Naples’s pizza makes it sound unique and delicious. Does the "it" in the sentence above refer to the description or the pizza? Would it be better ...
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1answer
1k views

sorry that I did something, sorry for doing something, or sorry to have done something?

Should it be: 1) "I am sorry (that) I did this to you." 2) "I am sorry for doing this to you." 3) "I am sorry to have done this to you." From what I have learnt about 'sorry', I would exclude 3) ...
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0answers
33 views

Comma usage and the phrase type

I was doing this online quiz and came across a compound sentence. The first sentence is this: The soccer team celebrated its victory *by going to Disneyland*. My question is what kind of phrases is ...
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1answer
79 views

“Human feelings are quite complex than of animals” - What should I put after “than”?

I want to write something meaning "humans have more complicated feelings than animals have." I wrote the following but I am not sure if "of" is the correct choice or not. Nevertheless, human ...
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0answers
26 views

How would one specify that Noun 2 in “[Prepositional phrase] [Noun 1] and [Noun 2]” is not an object of the prepositional phrase?

I will give an example of this problem. In fact, this example is the reason why I am asking! I am blending a quote taken from a book into an assignment on which I am currently working. (Don't worry, I ...
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1answer
90 views

Identifying the participial phrase in a sentence

They boarded the subway packed with people My attempt: I think "boarded the subway" is the participial phrase which modifies "they", because "packed with people" is a prepositional phrase ...
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1answer
98 views

“A of B” or “B A” Noun Adjunct vs. Prepositional Phrase

English, having originated as a germanic language, uses premodifier noun adjuncts (is this the right terminology?) to form compound nouns like "science fiction writer". However, English also says ...
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0answers
30 views

“From A to Z” and other corresponding prepositional phrases

Certain prepositional phrases seem to correspond to each other in the same way that correlative conjunctions do, but I've never heard of any grammar that relates two PPs. He traveled from France to ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Propositional Phrase

Take the following example sentence: "She was concerned that in spite of her recent requests, he wouldn't accept her proposal on time." Since there's a comma after 'requests', aught there to be one ...
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0answers
56 views

Verb groups and phrasal verbs

Here's a quick one: In the (potential) verb phrase 'had competed for [gaining control]' (I know it's not very elegant) is 'competed for' a phrasal verb or does 'for' begin a prepositional group with ...
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1answer
86 views

“Walk in” or “Walk into”? How to decide whether to use “in” or “into”? [duplicate]

"You can't just walk in/into the class without permission". What is the word to go by in this statement?
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6answers
105k views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
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4answers
156 views

Is the statement “to insert (one object) _over_ (another object)” acceptable usage?

The common definition for "insert" is: to put or place in, as in "to insert a key in a lock." Nonetheless, particularly in technical descriptions, you can find numerous examples where "insert" is ...
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1answer
42 views

connected parenthetical phrases

It is possible, as we all know, to say those sentences below. It was given to me by a kind woman. I walked on the top of the building with my friend under a moon light. One common point ...
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3answers
272 views

What is the real difference between direct objects and prepositional phrases?

I'm a fairly new ESL teacher. One of my students asked me recently why "...to comply with the rules of grammar" needs a preposition (with), whereas "...to follow the rules of grammar" doesn't. After ...
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3answers
3k views

“Seeking for an answer” or “seeking an answer”

What is the difference between seeking an answer and seeking for an answer? I found an ngram which says that seeking an answer is used much more often compared to seeking for an answer but how about ...
0
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1answer
99 views

parenthetical prepositional phrase

The narrator, in the quote, said that things turned out to be horrible. According to the question I previously posted, this parenthetical prepositional phrase "in the quote" is made possible by ...