Questions about prepositional phrases.

learn more… | top users | synonyms

1
vote
3answers
54 views

Is the statement “to insert (one object) _over_ (another object)” acceptable usage?

The common definition for "insert" is: to put or place in, as in "to insert a key in a lock." Nonetheless, particularly in technical descriptions, you can find numerous examples where "insert" is ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

“I'm a student at UCLA” or “I'm a student in UCLA”?

Sounds simple, but I've always been confused. I am also not sure about using the definite article, like “I'm a student in/at the UCLA.” Is that normative American English? Thanks for your help.
1
vote
1answer
28 views

“Dance it out” or “dance it off”? [closed]

If the one wanted to, for example, dance to forget about problems/to unload, should we colloquially say 'dance it off' or 'dance it out'?
4
votes
3answers
308 views

Part of speech of “brief” and “short” in the phrases “in brief” and “in short”

The phrases "in brief" and "in short" function as adverbs, but as what part of speech do "brief" and "short" function in these phrases? "Brief" stands alone as both a noun and adjective and could be ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

Can a prepositional phrase starting with “during” work as an adjectival phrase?

A prepositional phrase comprising a preposition and a noun phrase can generally function either as an adjectival phrase or as an adverbial phrase. The book on the table is mine. (The ...
1
vote
1answer
20 views

Prepositional phrases - adverbial vs. adjectival

I have a question about a prepositional phrase. -Don't throw the cigarette butts away in the trash bin. -Make sure to throw away all the paper on the floor. Both of two sentences have the same ...
8
votes
3answers
823 views

When can “very” modify a prepositional phrase?

In Hamlet, when Hammy Jr. asks Polonius whether a cloud looks like a whale, Polly replies, Very like a whale. In contemporary English, however, "very like ..." feels ungrammatical. You instead ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Get a contact to or on somebody

I have a pickle. A student of mine asked me to check his email in which he said: 'Here's contact to Mr. XYZ.' I didn't find it wrong, but than his colleagues suggested: 'Contact on Mr. ...
0
votes
3answers
77 views

“Seeking for an answer” or “seeking an answer”

What is the difference between seeking an answer and seeking for an answer? I found an ngram which says that seeking an answer is used much more often compared to seeking for an answer but how about ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

“answered in” or “answered”?

I'm confused whether the verb answer should come with the preposition in or without it in a sentence "the timing a question will be answered in is important" or "the timing a question will be answered ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

Help identifying preposition in a sentence [closed]

In the sentence, "Most toys are made in China". Is the preposition (In China)? If so, does that work grammatically? Thanks, Ben
0
votes
0answers
44 views

prepositions “in” and “at” with school subjects

I came across a phrase: "My brother is first in Maths" Is it possible to say "he is first at Maths" instead of "he is first in Maths"? I thought that I should say "at" when I speak about somebody's ...
1
vote
2answers
57 views

“Considering …, the middle-out approach” Is this a dangling modifier? [closed]

I am writing my thesis and I have the following sentence: [Considering its empirical complements together with the complexity, extensiveness and dynamics of the city logistic system,] the ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

an outstanding profile for (a quality or achievement)? [closed]

I have a question about my usage of "profile" in the following sentence: X is a businessman from Y with an outstanding profile for his success in the supply industry as well as his passion for ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“Which course are you enrolled in?” vs. “Under which course are you enrolled?”

If I want to ask someone about the course they are taking, what would be the more appropriate usage: Which course are you enrolled in? Under which course are you enrolled?
0
votes
0answers
22 views

PP in NP: complements or adjuncts?

Can you help me to find what function/relation these components(italicised) hold to the head noun(bold-faced)? the benefit of running 5k everyday the results of being a single mom Are they ...
2
votes
3answers
113 views

Does “on earth” replace “on the earth” in modern English?

I am a non-native English speaker. Since school, I was taught "on the earth" is equal to "in the world", and "on earth"'s meaning should be "indeed". But nowadays, I find "on earth" has replaced "on ...
5
votes
2answers
634 views

Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?

Nothing but birds and a few insects [was/were] to be seen. In that sentence, should the verb agree with "nothing" or with "birds and a few insects"?
6
votes
3answers
11k views

Is there a difference in meaning between “from the beginning” and “since the beginning”?

He’s been with us from the beginning. Is there a difference between from and since in the context of the quoted sentence?
1
vote
1answer
527 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
0
votes
3answers
97 views

Call In/For a New Job

Suppose I looked for a job on the Internet, found a few offers interesting and decided to call the phone numbers they had posted. Am I calling in or calling for the new jobs? (Or should I simply say ...
2
votes
2answers
158 views

Difference in meaning of 'sorry for your loss' & 'sorry about your loss'?

Does the two preposition 'about' & 'for' impart different meaning to the phrases 'sorry for your loss' & 'sorry about your loss' ? Considering the cases of both personal loss(death) & ...
4
votes
4answers
278 views

Which is better equivalent for “in stock”? “At hand”, “on hand”, or “in hand”?

Which is a better equivalent for “in stock” (meaning a product is in stock)? “at hand” “on hand” “in hand” Can any of them be used? Which is the most appropriate? Which is second-best?
0
votes
0answers
39 views

Function of “about”- practised physiotherapy for about 6 months

I practised physiotherapy for about 6 months. I understand that "about" can take forms such as an adv, adj, preposition. Though I can rephrase the sentence, however, I am curious to find out ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

Near, near to and nearby. What's the difference?

Why isn't near, near to and nearby always interchangeable? They can precede the noun. I live nearby the railway station I live near the railway station I live near to the railway station ...
-1
votes
2answers
75 views

What's the hypercorrect way to phrase a sentence with two 'for's in a row?

Some backstory: It was the Friday before Valentine's day, and I walked into a classroom to find a pile of Hershey's Kisses left for someone in the class. Initially, I wanted to take one, but then I ...
2
votes
3answers
66 views

Use of preposition “from” after “across” [closed]

I need a little help with these sentences: The cafe is across from the tailor. The cafe is across the tailor. Which one is correct? Thank you!
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Adjective after instead

The study described in the article shows that implementation of dynamic LED boards doesn’t show a clear increase in traffic flow at the bottleneck before congestions, probably because the LED ...
19
votes
6answers
31k views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
10
votes
4answers
874 views

Do brides in church weddings go up the aisle toward the altar or down the aisle toward the altar?

Nigel Rees, The Cassell Dictionary of Word and Phrase Origins (1987) has this entry regarding the question "WHY DO WE SAY ... BRIDES GO UP THE AISLE?" Sir Thomas Bazley fired off a letter to The ...
3
votes
4answers
538 views

Difference between 'to the left' and 'on the left'

I have encountered these expressions today, when I was describing a photo. People are lining up in the picture. I wanted to explain someone who is standing next to the person on the far left. And I ...
1
vote
2answers
154 views

“identical with” vs. “identical to”

I find myself always wondering which is the grammatically correct expression or, provided that both are correct, whether there are differences between their meaning. One example: Passage A in this ...
0
votes
3answers
199 views

Alternative to ending an sentence with “contribute to”

I have a bad habit of leaving ending sentences with prepositions. I'm inclined to write: Two communities I'm working to contribute to Is there a phrasing, and possibly a grammatical rule, that ...
0
votes
2answers
53 views

“Change in meaning (or role, or use)” vs "Change of meaning (or role, or use)

I'm slightly confused. I'm editing my notes from an introductory lecture to grammar and I found this: A change in the form of the word in order to express a change in the use, meaning or role in ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

Sentences start with Of

What is the meaning of of when it starts a sentence? For example, and what is the grammatically correct way to write a sentence starting with of?
0
votes
1answer
72 views

what is the prepositional object of “1 in 5 students”? [duplicate]

"1 in 5 students uses tobacco." What is the subject? What is the prepositional object of "in"? What part of speech is "5"? What part of speech is "students"? I don't need a re-wording of the ...
1
vote
1answer
80 views

Do we say “After 7th grade” or “After THE 7th grade”

I would like to ask if we say "After 7th grade" or "After THE 7th grade"
0
votes
0answers
63 views

Recommended sources for understanding the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions

Can anyone recommend to me a good book and any other sources where I can study in detail the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions? Since I am a visual learner, I would love to find ...
-1
votes
1answer
870 views

When should I use a comma before a prepositional phrase?

Can someone please give me some examples of when I should and should not use a comma before a prepositional phrase? These are some of the sentences that I am having trouble with: These are the ...
4
votes
2answers
109 views

Can one talk “with” someone?

The verb talk usually has to preceding its complement/object: (I) I talked to him about his misbehavior. Is it idiomatic (and/or grammatical) to use with instead? (II) I talked with him about ...
2
votes
2answers
338 views

What does “She is tall for her age” mean?

I read the following sentence She is tall for her age. Now I'm greatly confused about its meaning. Does it mean "she would have as long age as she is tall" (perhaps showing prediction) Or ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

Uncommon uses of the preposition 'with'

It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions: Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And ...
2
votes
1answer
260 views

“At the most difficult times” or “in the most difficult times”

In the example below which preposition is appropriate: at or in? Family will be there for you [at/in] the most difficult times no matter what.
3
votes
2answers
280 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
3
votes
1answer
398 views

Ordering prepositional phrases

I have rewritten a sentence like the one below several times, and I could not seem to put the prepositional phrases in an order that sounded correct to me. Is there a better way to construct this ...
3
votes
2answers
166 views

Omitting definite articles in prepositional phrases with specific objects

Hyphenated adjectives aside, is omitting the "the" in "on scene," "in studio," "on set" etc. any more or less correct than including it? My inquiry stems primarily from curiosity about the use of ...
2
votes
3answers
478 views

'out of' vs 'from' (a series)

Is it acceptable to say something along the lines of "this microphone is out of the 122 series" instead of "this microphone is from the 122 series" ? I have a colleague who insists that using 'out ...
5
votes
2answers
536 views

Prepositions: “The confusing widgets of language”

The title is adapted from an article in THE WEEK, written by James Harbeck. Well worth reading if you ask me. I don't particularly like prepositions. They are small, seemingly insignificant things ...
0
votes
2answers
129 views

Terminal preposition / adposition question

So I was hoping to know if the phrase as many as I can think of is improper or incorrect because it ends with the word "of"? What would be a way to minimally change this to not violate any ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...