Questions about prepositional phrases.

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Recommended sources for understanding the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions

Can anyone recommend to me a good book and any other sources where I can study in detail the spatial and abstract meanings of English prepositions? Since I am a visual learner, I would love to find ...
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1answer
32 views

When should I use a comma before a prepositional phrase?

Can someone please give me some examples of when I should and should not use a comma before a prepositional phrase? These are some of the sentences that I am having trouble with: These are the ...
3
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2answers
64 views

Can one talk “with” someone?

The verb talk usually has to preceding its complement/object: (I) I talked to him about his misbehavior. Is it idiomatic (and/or grammatical) to use with instead? (II) I talked with him about ...
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2answers
107 views

What does “She is tall for her age” mean?

I read the following sentence She is tall for her age. Now I'm greatly confused about its meaning. Does it mean "she would have as long age as she is tall" (perhaps showing prediction) Or ...
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1answer
47 views

Uncommon uses of the preposition 'with'

It strikes me that the way we use 'with' is more complex than we may think. So I have two questions: Can the preposition 'with' be used to mean 'about' or 'in relation to'? (sentence a and b). And ...
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56 views

Adjective after instead

The study described in the article shows that implementation of dynamic LED boards doesn’t show a clear increase in traffic flow at the bottleneck before congestions, probably because the LED ...
2
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1answer
44 views

“At the most difficult times” or “in the most difficult times”

In the example below which preposition is appropriate: at or in? Family will be there for you [at/in] the most difficult times no matter what.
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3answers
124 views

Which is better equivalent for “in stock”? “At hand”, “on hand”, or “in hand”?

Which is a better equivalent for “in stock” (meaning a product is in stock)? “at hand” “on hand” “in hand” Can any of them be used? Which is the most appropriate? Which is second-best?
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2answers
129 views

The Order of Modification in English Nouns, Preceding or Succeeding? [closed]

As I don't know the exact linguistic terms, what I mean my "preceding" and "succeeding" in modifying nouns is as follows. Preceding : delicious food, long way, kind person, et cetera Succeeding : ...
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2answers
68 views

Omitting definite articles in prepositional phrases with specific objects

Hyphenated adjectives aside, is omitting the "the" in "on scene," "in studio," "on set" etc. any more or less correct than including it? My inquiry stems primarily from curiosity about the use of ...
2
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3answers
112 views

'out of' vs 'from' (a series)

Is it acceptable to say something along the lines of "this microphone is out of the 122 series" instead of "this microphone is from the 122 series" ? I have a colleague who insists that using 'out ...
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1answer
81 views

Ordering prepositional phrases

I have rewritten a sentence like the one below several times, and I could not seem to put the prepositional phrases in an order that sounded correct to me. Is there a better way to construct this ...
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4answers
243 views

“My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow” (grammar of 'to dinner')

My aunt is coming to dinner tomorrow. The meaning is clear. However, if you think about it, what this seems to literally say is that the aunt is going directly to some dinner (and not even an ...
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1answer
47 views

“Most of what” and “is” or “are”

I've gotten into an argument about whether "Most of what I've read is books" or "Most of what I've read are books" is correct. I think it should be "is" because "most of" refers to "what I've read" ...
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3answers
106 views

Is there an -ically suffixed word to describe a duration?

We know about chronologically to describe order by time, but is there a word to describe duration? I want to say something like "school is x-ically taxing", as in, school is heavily taxing on an ...
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2answers
443 views

Prepositions: “The confusing widgets of language”

The title is adapted from an article in THE WEEK, written by James Harbeck. Well worth reading if you ask me. I don't particularly like prepositions. They are small, seemingly insignificant things ...
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2answers
202 views

Meaning of “by” when used with dates - inclusive or exclusive [duplicate]

If, in a contract fr example, the text reads: "X has to finish the work by MM-DD-YYYY", does the "by" include the date or exclude it? In other words, will the work delivered on the specified date ...
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0answers
78 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
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3answers
380 views

Near, near to and nearby. What's the difference?

Why isn't near, near to and nearby always interchangeable? They can precede the noun. I live nearby the railway station I live near the railway station I live near to the railway station ...
5
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3answers
425 views

On the part of speech of “now”

I recently had a conversation about the Spanish word "ahora", in which my conversant claimed that "ahora" is always an adverb, and never a noun. This lead me to investigate the part of speech of ...
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2answers
70 views

How to best correct ambiguity of “in the room next to me”?

A common construction in English is: There is a person in the room next to me. However, this is ambiguous because it’s unclear whether the person is in a separate room that happens to be ...
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1answer
105 views

The relative pronoun “which” and the omission in this sentence

The complete sentence: Yet I should point out before I proceed with this line that when I use ‘ideology,’ I do not mean to imply the now-familiar sinister connotations of mischief or falsehood ...
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0answers
119 views

When is it appropriate to use a comma before “which”, “with”, and “who”?

Is it appropriate to use a comma before which in the following sentence? The group has helped me to make new friends and become more independent, which has increased my self-confidence. Is it ...
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3answers
201 views

What function does this prepositional phrase have in this biblical sentence?

From Mark 7:13: Making the word of God of none effect through your tradition, which ye have delivered: and many such like things do ye. Although this sentence may be incomplete, I am wondering ...
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1answer
136 views

Using two and’s in one sentence, and starting a sentence with “To” [duplicate]

Is this sentence correct? To view your policy status, last payment information and next payment information, enter your policy number in the box below and click Submit to continue. I’m not a fan ...
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1answer
167 views

Why is “in the catching of” wrong?

In this sentence, in the catching of is grammatically incorrect, but I cannot tell how: The new system, which uses remote cameras in the catching of speeding motorists, may undermine the police ...
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2answers
119 views

“On the principle” versus “Under the principle”

Is there a significant difference between the two? As far as I can tell, they seem to be used interchangeably.
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2answers
98 views

“as much as you and I” vs. “as much as you and me”

This was posted on facebook and people are saying it is incorrect, it should be: "...as you and I" Which is correct?
2
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1answer
62 views

A question about “to becoming” [duplicate]

Would this sentence be correct? Being scared is the first step to becoming free. The more I look at it, the less clear it becomes.
5
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2answers
727 views

Is 'there' an adverb or a preposition? (Or something else entirely!?)

Most dictionaries seem to describe 'there' as an adverb. Oxford online dictionary definition Is this true? "Last year we went to Paris. We stayed there for three nights." In sentences like this ...
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1answer
67 views

“On the equivalence of A and B” or “between A and B”

I am writing an academic paper with a choice of titles: On the equivalence of A and B On the equivalence between A and B or On the equivalence of A, B and C On the equivalence ...
5
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2answers
342 views

Is “nothing but birds and a few insects” singular or plural?

Nothing but birds and a few insects [was/were] to be seen. In the above sentence, should the verb agree with "nothing" or with "birds and a few insects"?
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4answers
92 views

Does one open a browser “on” a URL?

Can I say: It opens the browser on the URL [X] meaning that something is opening the browser with the URL [X] already typed in and loading?
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5answers
100 views

“A threat to us people” or “a threat to we people”? [closed]

Which of these is correct: Global warming is a great threat to us people. Global warming is a great threat to we people.
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1answer
149 views

“but, except, besides”?

When learning the infinitive construction, my teacher told us that if “but, except, besides” serves as a preposition and before them there exists “do” or its other forms (did, does), “but, except, ...
2
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1answer
68 views

What kind of phrase is this? [manically across the stage]

In the sentence: At the beginning of the play, the entire cast dances maniacally across the stage. What kind of phrase is [manically across the stage]? Is it an adverb phrase, prepositional phrase or ...
2
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1answer
91 views

Two verbal nouns with one/two prepositional phrases

I have a question on English style. Take the following sentence: Following the Candidate Shabbat, all participants are mailed an official letter of acceptance to or rejection from the program. ...
3
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3answers
87 views

Do I need an extra “about”, or does one suffice?

Consider the following sentence: I have a lot to talk about with John about his project. Since I can swap the position of the first about to make it 'I have a lot to talk with John about', then ...
3
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1answer
128 views

Version control “in revision” vs. “at revision”

Should a programmer use in or at as a preposition when referring to the version-control revision number? Example: Which is correct, fixed in revision 12345 or fixed at revision 12345? The ...
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4answers
103 views

Half doesn't or half don't? [duplicate]

What’s the right version of these two? Half of the students doesn’t bother to show up. Half of the students don’t bother to show up. Or are both right?
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3answers
432 views

Having had someone DO or Having had someone TO DO?

I have read an older thread, presenting the following sentences: Having advised many of your colleagues (yet having had no one stand up for me when the shit hit the fan)... and Having ...
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3answers
48 views

Is “a ten-minutes of a song” right?

I'm curious about if "I need a ten-minutes of 'SONG' to do sth." was right in English. Thanks for reading this quesiton
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2answers
109 views

Why do we say “the Indians were put on reservations” and not “in reservations”

The preposition "on" is used to refer to a surface like "on the floor" or "on the ceiling" "in" is used to refer as a enclosed space like "in a country" or "in a city". Why do we say "the Indians ...
0
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1answer
44 views

“Reduce the amount of water” vs. “reduce the water amount”

The first "sounds" better to me but I'm trying to figure out if there is a formal rule regarding which one is more proper in American English: reduce the amount of water reduce the water ...
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2answers
91 views

Terminal preposition / adposition question

So I was hoping to know if the phrase as many as I can think of is improper or incorrect because it ends with the word "of"? What would be a way to minimally change this to not violate any ...
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2answers
3k views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
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5answers
8k views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
3
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3answers
139 views

What preposition do we use with the adjective 'telling' when it means 'revealing'?

Example I: "How telling this is [of/about] the way international students continue to be perceived by their American peers on U.S. campuses?" Example II: "Public opinion is telling ...
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147 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
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1answer
955 views

“I'm a student at UCLA” or “I'm a student in UCLA”?

Sounds simple, but I've always been confused. I am also not sure about using the definite article, like “I'm a student in/at the UCLA.” Is that normative American English? Thanks for your help.