Questions about prepositional phrases.

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0
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3answers
39 views

Is “a ten-minutes of a song” right?

I'm curious about if "I need a ten-minutes of 'SONG' to do sth." was right in English. Thanks for reading this quesiton
1
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2answers
77 views

Why do we say “the Indians were put on reservations” and not “in reservations”

The preposition "on" is used to refer to a surface like "on the floor" or "on the ceiling" "in" is used to refer as a enclosed space like "in a country" or "in a city". Why do we say "the Indians ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“Reduce the amount of water” vs. “reduce the water amount”

The first "sounds" better to me but I'm trying to figure out if there is a formal rule regarding which one is more proper in American English: reduce the amount of water reduce the water ...
0
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1answer
24 views

Terminal preposition / adposition question

So I was hoping to know if the phrase as many as I can think of is improper or incorrect because it ends with the word "of"? What would be a way to minimally change this to not violate any ...
4
votes
2answers
299 views

Can a prepositional phrase be the direct object?

We're covering grammar in English I, and we just got to gerunds. In one of the exercises, I had the sentence "Pilgrims learned about planting crops from the Wampanoags." I'm supposed to find the ...
2
votes
4answers
322 views

“Replace with” versus “replace by”

I often see "replace with" and "replace by" used interchangeably, but this doesn't sound right to me: I replaced that component by this one. I would use "with" in such a sentence. "By" only ...
3
votes
3answers
52 views

What preposition do we use with the adjective 'telling' when it means 'revealing'?

Example I: "How telling this is [of/about] the way international students continue to be perceived by their American peers on U.S. campuses?" Example II: "Public opinion is telling ...
-1
votes
1answer
50 views

The repetition of the preposition 'to' in this sentence.

Is there a work-around I can use so that I can avoid the close repetition of to in the following sentence? Clearly my advice-giver here does not know what it means for someone to decide to ...
0
votes
1answer
115 views

“I'm a student at UCLA” or “I'm a student in UCLA”?

Sounds simple, but I've always been confused. I am also not sure about using the definite article, like “I'm a student in/at the UCLA.” Is that normative American English? Thanks for your help.
0
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2answers
145 views

Is “by the street” valid English?

Is "walking by the street" grammatical? Or do I need to write "in/on the street"? Do they convey a different meaning?
0
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1answer
193 views

preposition 'to' after verb 'talk' [closed]

I'm confused whether it is correct to use 'to' after 'talk' or not? Some examples would really be appreciated.
-1
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1answer
115 views

sorry that I did something, sorry for doing something, or sorry to have done something?

Should it be: 1) "I am sorry (that) I did this to you." 2) "I am sorry for doing this to you." 3) "I am sorry to have done this to you." From what I have learnt about 'sorry', I would exclude 3) ...
0
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2answers
49 views

separability, and a question of emphasis

The sentence in question: In short, the so-called “balance of power” is nothing but a policy that masks beneath a desire to preserve a favorable nuclear status quo designed to keep an entire ...
0
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1answer
52 views

what do you think of NP?

[i] She thinks of herself as a poet. (Collins #7) [ii] People are thinking of her for president. (Webster’s, think of #2.b) [iii] What do you think of the film? (Cambridge) It seems like verb ...
0
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3answers
74 views

Expressions similar to “at the expense of”

I'm struggling to expand my vocabulary. Could you please provide expressions alike to "at the expense of"? Words or phrases are all well-appreciated.
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Up- vs Down-here

Geographically speaking, up is north and down is south (if that's wrong, my entire question is dumb). My friends keep saying they are doing something "down here" when they are actually talking about ...
0
votes
1answer
222 views

“With use of” or “with the use of”?

Do you solve engineering problems with use of programming methods, or, Do you solve engineering problems with the use of programming methods ? Which one is true? Or are both of them false? If so, ...
2
votes
2answers
103 views

Usage of 'into' after 'penetrate'

Somehow I have difficulties telling which one is more correct They penetrate into the building OR They penetrate the building I've heard it being used both ways and I'd like to hear some thoughts on ...
2
votes
2answers
394 views

What's the most appropriate preposition to use with the word “status”?

Say I have application that tracks TODO items; each TODO item has a status, e.g. "Not Started", "In Progress", "Completed", etc. Which phrasing is the most appropriate to display in the application? ...
1
vote
1answer
193 views

Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase?

It seems like a basic concept, but I want to make sure. Can the antecedent ever be in a prepositional phrase? For example: Jill likes running with Julie. She is a good person. Does she refer to ...
0
votes
1answer
73 views

Ambiguity about passive in my textbook

In my textbook, it said "In an active sentence we need to include the agent as subject; using a passive allows us to omit the agent by leaving out the prepositional phrase with by" Ex: ...
1
vote
1answer
273 views

Can “to be able to” be used without preposition

Can the phrase "to be able to" be used without the preposition "to". For example, can you say "I will call you back as soon as I am able?"
-2
votes
1answer
130 views

“All of the above” usage [duplicate]

My spelling tool suggests that I should fix "All of the" to "All the" in the following statements: If we take all of the above notes into account... All of the methods described above shorten your ...
2
votes
2answers
336 views

prepositional phrases strong enough to bring 'the' before the nouns they modify?

I was wondering if prepositional phrases alone were strong enough to bring the relative pronoun the before the nouns that they modify. Upon reading (2) do you feel the people is restricted or ...
2
votes
1answer
155 views

Apart from + infinitive

A piece of news from the BBC reads as follows [emphasis in the original]: The UN has said very little on the matter, apart from to insist it is immune from legal proceedings. Now, I knew that ...
0
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2answers
97 views

Technicalities about “%”?

Usage of "%" I'm almost positive it's a prepositional phrase since it's really means "per cent" or "per 100". So in a sentence like: 90% of my street are doing lawn work. It would be "are" and ...
2
votes
1answer
321 views

Is it preferable to generally use nested prepositional phrases or a hyphenated adjectival phrase?

I've recently run into some sticky situations involving how to write out complicated concept descriptions. Take this example: Which metrics are appropriate for evaluating the accuracy of a ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between prepositional phrase and adverbial complement?

“I try to give ‘em a reason, you see. It helps folks if they can latch onto a reason.” (Harper Lee, To Kill A Mockingbird) When we say ‘prepositional verb’ and ‘adverbial complement,’ are they ...
1
vote
0answers
209 views

Help sheet for determiners and prepositions [closed]

I'm trying to produce a simple help sheet for foriegn speakers on English determiners and prepositions. Specifically, a basic description of when to use each type of determiner, and then the list of ...
-1
votes
1answer
76 views

preposition plus as little noise as possible

The side-passage door was fastened; I opened it with as little noise as possible. (Jane Eyre) What do you call grammatically ‘as little noise as possible’ after ‘with’? I’m very confused ...
0
votes
3answers
594 views

two prepositional phrases

The lighted dial of Dudley's watch, which was dangling over the edge of the sofa on his fat wrist, told Harry he'd be eleven in ten minutes' time. (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) Are ...
1
vote
3answers
615 views

What is the difference between these two sentences?

Consider these two sentences: "I gave him a pencil," and, "I gave a pencil to him." Is it correct that the important part of the sentence is placed at the end? When we want to emphasize the pencil ...
-1
votes
2answers
646 views

Is “off to somewhere with a car” correct?

I wonder if the structure of the following sentence is correct: I'm off to my place with my car. I'm the one driving the car, but I prefer not to use the verb drive. Would the following ...
-2
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1answer
862 views

When do we use “to” as an infinitive marker? [closed]

In these two sentences: I look forward to get. I look forward to getting it. Why is the first sentence incorrect? When do we use to as an infinitive marker?
0
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1answer
2k views

“For clarity” vs. “To make clear” [closed]

Compare: "He modified the sentence for clarity." vs "He modified the sentence to make it clear." Any difference here?
2
votes
1answer
195 views

When should the subject agree with the object of the preposition?

Quite often while I'm looking through research articles, I see sentences that start like this one: The tensile strengths of the composites changed... I generally change strengths to strength in ...
1
vote
3answers
180 views

“compiled with gcc” vs “compiled in gcc”

"This program was compiled with gcc." "This program was compiled in gcc." "This program was written in C++." "This program was written with C++." Note: gcc is a widely used compiler ...
1
vote
3answers
136 views

“running on windows” vs “running under windows” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Run on an OS” vs. “run under an OS” "This application can run on windows" versus "This application can run under windows" Which is more natural, or what's the ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

What part of speech are the words in the phrase “as well as”?

In the sentence: My car as well as my lap top were stolen last night. What part of speech are the words in the phrase as well as? I believe the first as is the preposition of the phrase, that ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What are “up” and “down” in “up there” and “down there”?

"Up there" and "down there" are two of the most frequent expressions that I, myself, use often. I really don't know whether they are just expressions used to refer to a place to go ("I went down ...
4
votes
3answers
447 views

Test for intransitivity of verbs?

Is it true that if any verb is immediately followed by a prepositional phrase, then it has to be an intransitive verb? As a counter example, I need a sentence which: (i) has only one verb, and ...
1
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2answers
704 views

Infinitive or Gerund for celebration of an event?

Which of the following sentences would be correct in a baby shower invitation. My grandparents are looking forward to celebrate my arrival in February. My grandparents are looking forward to ...
0
votes
2answers
6k views

“Support of” vs. “Support for”

"Show your support for the XYZ (Organization name) this season" or "Show your support of XYZ (Organization name) this year"? I have seen support of and support for both being used. Is there a rule? ...
5
votes
3answers
491 views

When can “very” modify a prepositional phrase?

In Hamlet, when Hammy Jr. asks Polonius whether a cloud looks like a whale, Polly replies, Very like a whale. In contemporary English, however, "very like ..." feels ungrammatical. You instead ...
4
votes
4answers
356 views

Up my street and down the lane [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Do I travel “up” or “down” to London from north of the city? Except where there is obvious difference in elevation e.g. on a sloping road, how do ...
7
votes
3answers
960 views

Using “to” versus “for” between two nouns (“key to success”)

Another user provided an example and I have added others: Key to exercise Key for exercise Answer to a problem Answer for a problem Bullet to a gun Bullet for a gun She bought ...
6
votes
2answers
244 views

On Paddington Station?

I was interested to read that Paddington Bear was found on Paddington Station, not in or at Paddington Station. I would never have chosen this usage (I speak Canadian English). I had a look at Google ...
4
votes
4answers
3k views

“'To'/'on' the contrary” in these sentences: is the difference very slight?

I was interested in the following sentences which appeared, respectively, in a news article titled “Can’t Park? Blame a Condo" and in a news article titled "Senator Simmons on the Negro", both in The ...
9
votes
3answers
38k views

“Consist in” vs. “consist of”

I would like to have this clear once and for all: What is the correct use of consist in / consist of? "Meditation consists in/of attentive watchfulness." "The body consists in/of cells." ...
3
votes
1answer
6k views

Is single-word “inbetween” becoming more acceptable? How far can it go?

I get the distinct feeling that "inbetween" occurs increasingly often as a single word, but I'm not at all clear on why it's used more in some contexts than others. What I can is see that in Google ...