A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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Are there any patterns to observe in choosing the correct negation prefix to use?

Are there any patterns to observe in choosing the correct prefix to use? There are other prefixes as well, but these are usually the ones I mix up. As in unbelievable, disproportionate, asymmetric, ...
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37 views

“non-assigned” or “un-assigned” inventory?

I am writing up a procedure regarding inventory that is not assigned to any specific employee of the company and would like to know if I should refer to this inventory as "non-assigned" inventory, or "...
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1answer
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Why can we use “inadequate” but not “inspecific”?

I find the use of the word "inspecific" very natural. It makes sense and flows easily in sentences I speak and write (to myself at least). However, upon inspection, it is apparently not a valid ...
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1answer
40 views

Pronunciation of prefixes or letters like “acc-” , “ent-”, “tri-” in various words like accent, enter, trivial? [on hold]

I am not a native English speaker and thus the variation of pronunciation always amazes me. How can the exact prefix or letters pronounced so differently in some words, for example: Accent is ...
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1answer
110 views

What does the prefix “aff” mean? [closed]

What does the prefix "aff" mean in the following words: affine, affirmative, affirm, affable, affection, affluent. Do they have some meaning in common?
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“Unselect” or “Deselect”?

If I want the user to revert their operation of selecting an item, should I say: "Unselect the option" or "Deselect the option"?
26
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3k views

What do you call the other bit of a word with a prefix

Let's say I have a word like unhappy. The "un" is called the prefix. What is the other bit called?
5
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1answer
89 views

What's the word for the use of the wrong prefix or suffix?

For example if someone said unliterate instead of illiterate or discluded instead of excluded? Is there a word for this kind of grammatical error?
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49 views

Which form would be correct: cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity?

I want to stop changing my mind, I've used all three of the forms cyber security, cyber-security or cybersecurity at different times. There have been previous discussions on this (e.g. here and here) ...
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Preservation of the en- prefix form of Latin negative prefix in-, in enemy & enmity

The en- in enemy is a prefix meaning "not": the origin is Latin inimicus, from in- + amicus — a "not friend" or an "unfriend" (Online Etymology Dictionary—enemy). The Latin in- changed to en- when ...
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Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?

The root words in the examples below look fine even without a prefix: un + bearable ir + regular dis + able mis + fortune ... but not in these: pro + gress pro + mote Possibly, I ...
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Adam lay ybounden. Any ys around these days?

thanks for pointing out the similar question. Great, but note that I'm trying to find ... • is there any SPECIFIC examples/evidence around of yword yusage TODAY? if so is it only jokey, is there any ...
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51 views

Undeletable vs Indeletable [closed]

Why do we say undeletable instead of indeletable. Sometimes with other words we use an in prefix, such as with indefatigable. I'm curious about un vs in.
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What is the difference between “Hept-” and “Sept-” prefixes?

As I understand it, both the prefixes "Hept-" and "Sept-" are used to indicate seven of something. We have examples of English words that use both: e.g. Heptathalon, Heptagon, Heptane vs ...
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1answer
42 views

poetic or artistic uses of prefix “proto”

The prefix "proto" is found in technical writing, meaning "first" (as in the first form of a chemical compound or biological process). But it's an evocative word for me as a composer when used to ...
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Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”?

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
2
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1answer
52 views

“Dis-” prefix meaning and etymology [closed]

Most native speakers are used to "dis-" as a prefix having a negative or opposite connotation (disengaged, dissatisfied, disinterested). However, in rare cases, "dis-" is actually an amplifying prefix,...
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5answers
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“Not able to” vs. “unable to”

Which phrase is more suitable to convey one's inability to do something — "not able to" or "unable to"? For example, not able to join the meeting unable to join the meeting
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Meaning of the “rupt” suffix/prefix

I was wondering the other day about the word corrupt, found that the suffix "rupt" appears in many words and as a prefix for another set and decided to ask this question: What does "rupt" mean? ...
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2answers
353 views

Are there any words similar to “abnormal”? [closed]

If we remove ab-, the word abnormal becomes normal, which is the opposite. Are there any other words that are similar and start with the prefix ab-?
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2answers
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The prefix “post” can it mean before? [closed]

The posterior is the behind, the postero-dorsal is behind the antero-dorsal. But when we're talking about time, postmodern means "of, relating to, or being an era after a modern one". So are there ...
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6answers
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“para-” in words like “paraglider” and “parabrake”

As is well known, para-, in its meaning of "alongside or beyond", is derived from Greek loanwords such as paraphrase and parasite, while its meaning of "against" is derived from the Latin "be prepared"...
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1answer
42 views

Does “pro-” always precede “pre-” in a sequence? Why?

In biological vocabulary, sometimes both pre- and pro- are used as prefixes to indicate something earlier in a sequence. For example, pro-B cells develop into pre-B cells, which eventually develop ...
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Pronunciation of the prefix “tri”

I know that English pronunciation is rather arbitrary. There are still some "rules" that even with many exceptions are useful for non-natives like me. I'm puzzled about the pronunciation of the very ...
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Combining forms of country names

For the names of various countries, we have combining forms, e.g.: England -> Anglo- France -> Franco- Russia -> Russo- China -> Sino- India -> Indo- These seem to be used in two major contexts: ...
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Prefixes for Perishable

Unperishable, non-perishable and imperishable. I'm quite confused with which prefix is used. Searching online did not really give me any answers. I hope someone here can.
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Shortening of the phrase “Six weeks”?

In many North American high schools and colleges, the year is split into two sections, called "semesters". If the year is broken into three sections, they're referred to as "trimesters" (notice the ...
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Are there any formal infixes? [duplicate]

Infixes appear in words such as 'absolutely' to form 'abso-bloody-lutely', or as 'educate' to 'edu-ma-cate' in the Simpsons. I was wondering if there were any formal infixes. The only ones I could ...
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What is a good replacement for “ununderstandable”?

I want to tell a colleague of mine I'm doing something that will prevent her from getting "ununderstandable" errors. I have: ...so that you will not get unnecessary, [ununderstandable] errors. ...
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What prefix means “during”?

The prefixes "pre-" and "post-" refer to events before and after. For instance, "pre-season" and "post-season" or "pre-study" and "post-study". Is there a prefix fitting this pattern which means "...
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3answers
785 views

Are effect and affect related to efferent and afferent?

In my work I occasionally write about neurons. A common description of the relationship between two populations of neurons is to describe one as being "afferent" or "efferent" with respect to another. ...
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48 views

Using superlatives as prefixes, order of significance [duplicate]

This is kind of an opinion-leaning question. I'm naming a set of items based on their order of significance. Their names will be prefixed with the following superlatives: super, ultra, mega, hyper, ...
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51 views

The prefix pre and how to use it. office libre rejects everything [closed]

I'm writing in libreoffice...like openoffice etc. the spellcheck can be...completely unhelpful... It rejects the words prewrite and pre-write as well as preread and pre-read. I saw on the web pre ...
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1answer
56 views

Does “unrenamed” mean “not yet renamed”?

I am writing a software and the following description cannot be more than 15-20 characters long. I need to concisely say “files that have not been renamed”. I think “unrenamed files” works, ...
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What is the word origin for “ortho-,” “meta-,” and “para-” in chemistry?

The prefix "ortho-" means straight or right; "meta-" means beyond or after; "para-" means beside or along. How, then, did ortho-, meta- and para- come to refer to the carbon positions one, two, and ...
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1answer
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How did “perfidy” come to mean the absence of faithfulness / trust?

Perfidy is (OED): Deceitfulness, untrustworthiness; breach of faith or of a promise; betrayal of trust; treachery. The roots are per- and fidēs (faith) Per- carries several senses, but ...
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Etymology for “Mc‑” and “O’‑” prefix in surnames

There is clearly a prefix in names like McDonald, McChrystal, O’Brian, O’Neal. What does this Mc- and O- prefix signify? It looks like Donald, Chrystal, Brian, Neal are perfectly fine names on their ...
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untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
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Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
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Is “misconfigured” a word?

I use the word "misconfigured" all the time, but MS Word, Chrome, and the two dictionaries I checked don't list it as a word. I'm going to keep using it instead of "configured incorrectly" because I ...
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1answer
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On throwing alligators through windows

Over at the excellent Lowering the Bar there is a discussion on throwing alligators through windows:- Let’s apply that definition to our infenestrated alligator. Absolutely, but first let’s ...
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What is the history of adding the a- prefix to form words?

I have always found the a- prefix to words (as in anew, ajar, aside, awake, afoot, a-hunting, etc.) fascinating. The NOAD says on this topic: a- 2. prefix •to; toward : aside | ashore. •...
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Is/could “noctophyte” be a word?

Let me preface this by saying that I am trying to come up with an interesting-sounding name for gamedev purposes. I'm looking for a potentially imaginary word that can be given a logical definition. ...
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Prefix for three-way logic

As a programmer I usually want variable names that makes sense. I now stumbled upon a variable that can take three different values, so called three-valued logic. In this case I am trying to name a ...
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5answers
429 views

Nonstop, non-stop, or non stop? [closed]

Which is the proper spelling of "nonstop?" nonstop or non stop or non-stop
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117 views

Which animals can and can't be prefixed with “she-”?

I've heard of "she-wolf" (partially from mythology, partially from pop music), and I'm wondering which animals "she-" can and can't be used on. Wiktionary mentions a variety of animals (she-ass, she-...
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What are antonym-like prefixes to the Greek “crypto”?

What is a prefix that is similar to "public", or "accessible", or "ubiquitous" such that it is harmonious with the spirit of currency needing to be of public domain, widely adopted, accessible, etc. ...
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3answers
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Why is there a negation of “ability” but not a negation of “agility”?

Would like to know what is the reasoning behind the use of some prefixes for example if one were to use "un-"able as opposed to "dis-"able the situational context is understood yet the same does not ...
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Proper term for knowing four or more languages?

If bilingual means you know two languages, and trilingual means you know three, what would be the proper term for knowing four, five or even six languages?
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An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...