A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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Meaning of the “rupt” suffix/prefix

I was wondering the other day about the word corrupt, found that the suffix "rupt" appears in many words and as a prefix for another set and decided to ask this question: What does "rupt" mean? ...
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331 views

Are there any words similar to “abnormal”? [closed]

If we remove ab-, the word abnormal becomes normal, which is the opposite. Are there any other words that are similar and start with the prefix ab-?
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The prefix “post” can it mean before? [on hold]

The posterior is the behind, the postero-dorsal is behind the antero-dorsal. But when we're talking about time, postmodern means "of, relating to, or being an era after a modern one". So are there ...
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29 views

Cases of an ununsal “de-” prefix and reasons for it [on hold]

Someone can be involved in fraud or defraud and therefore be a fraudster/defraudster respectively. While in both cases deception for selfish ulterior motives is involved it's not the same, e.g. ...
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“para-” in words like “paraglider” and “parabrake”

As is well known, para-, in its meaning of "alongside or beyond", is derived from Greek loanwords such as paraphrase and parasite, while its meaning of "against" is derived from the Latin "be ...
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35 views

Does “pro-” always precede “pre-” in a sequence? Why?

In biological vocabulary, sometimes both pre- and pro- are used as prefixes to indicate something earlier in a sequence. For example, pro-B cells develop into pre-B cells, which eventually develop ...
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751 views

Pronunciation of the prefix “tri”

I know that English pronunciation is rather arbitrary. There are still some "rules" that even with many exceptions are useful for non-natives like me. I'm puzzled about the pronunciation of the very ...
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Combining forms of country names

For the names of various countries, we have combining forms, e.g.: England -> Anglo- France -> Franco- Russia -> Russo- China -> Sino- India -> Indo- These seem to be used in two major contexts: ...
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29 views

Prefixes for Perishable

Unperishable, non-perishable and imperishable. I'm quite confused with which prefix is used. Searching online did not really give me any answers. I hope someone here can.
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Shortening of the phrase “Six weeks”?

In many North American high schools and colleges, the year is split into two sections, called "semesters". If the year is broken into three sections, they're referred to as "trimesters" (notice the ...
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Are there any formal infixes? [duplicate]

Infixes appear in words such as 'absolutely' to form 'abso-bloody-lutely', or as 'educate' to 'edu-ma-cate' in the Simpsons. I was wondering if there were any formal infixes. The only ones I could ...
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What is a good replacement for “ununderstandable”?

I want to tell a colleague of mine I'm doing something that will prevent her from getting "ununderstandable" errors. I have: ...so that you will not get unnecessary, [ununderstandable] errors. ...
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What prefix means “during”?

The prefixes "pre-" and "post-" refer to events before and after. For instance, "pre-season" and "post-season" or "pre-study" and "post-study". Is there a prefix fitting this pattern which means ...
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Are effect and affect related to efferent and afferent?

In my work I occasionally write about neurons. A common description of the relationship between two populations of neurons is to describe one as being "afferent" or "efferent" with respect to another. ...
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48 views

Using superlatives as prefixes, order of significance [duplicate]

This is kind of an opinion-leaning question. I'm naming a set of items based on their order of significance. Their names will be prefixed with the following superlatives: super, ultra, mega, hyper, ...
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Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”?

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
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0answers
46 views

The prefix pre and how to use it. office libre rejects everything [closed]

I'm writing in libreoffice...like openoffice etc. the spellcheck can be...completely unhelpful... It rejects the words prewrite and pre-write as well as preread and pre-read. I saw on the web pre ...
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1answer
50 views

Does “unrenamed” mean “not yet renamed”?

I am writing a software and the following description cannot be more than 15-20 characters long. I need to concisely say “files that have not been renamed”. I think “unrenamed files” works, ...
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47 views

What is the word origin for “ortho-,” “meta-,” and “para-” in chemistry?

The prefix "ortho-" means straight or right; "meta-" means beyond or after; "para-" means beside or along. How, then, did ortho-, meta- and para- come to refer to the carbon positions one, two, and ...
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How did “perfidy” come to mean the absence of faithfulness / trust?

Perfidy is (OED): Deceitfulness, untrustworthiness; breach of faith or of a promise; betrayal of trust; treachery. The roots are per- and fidēs (faith) Per- carries several senses, but ...
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Etymology for “Mc‑” and “O’‑” prefix in surnames

There is clearly a prefix in names like McDonald, McChrystal, O’Brian, O’Neal. What does this Mc- and O- prefix signify? It looks like Donald, Chrystal, Brian, Neal are perfectly fine names on their ...
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untypical, atypical, nontypical

I'm trying to label customer data with a word describing how typical they are. There is basically 3 possible values: typical, temporarily untypical, untypical. But I'm not sure if "untypical" is the ...
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5answers
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Difference between misfunction and malfunction

Difference between misfunction and malfunction? Is misfunction a proper English word? If it is, what's the difference between the two above?
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Is “misconfigured” a word?

I use the word "misconfigured" all the time, but MS Word, Chrome, and the two dictionaries I checked don't list it as a word. I'm going to keep using it instead of "configured incorrectly" because I ...
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On throwing alligators through windows

Over at the excellent Lowering the Bar there is a discussion on throwing alligators through windows:- Let’s apply that definition to our infenestrated alligator. Absolutely, but first let’s ...
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What is the history of adding the a- prefix to form words?

I have always found the a- prefix to words (as in anew, ajar, aside, awake, afoot, a-hunting, etc.) fascinating. The NOAD says on this topic: a- 2. prefix •to; toward : aside | ashore. ...
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Is/could “noctophyte” be a word?

Let me preface this by saying that I am trying to come up with an interesting-sounding name for gamedev purposes. I'm looking for a potentially imaginary word that can be given a logical definition. ...
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Prefix for three-way logic

As a programmer I usually want variable names that makes sense. I now stumbled upon a variable that can take three different values, so called three-valued logic. In this case I am trying to name a ...
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“Unselect” or “Deselect”?

If I want the user to revert their operation of selecting an item, should I say: "Unselect the option" or "Deselect the option"?
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169 views

Nonstop, non-stop, or non stop? [closed]

Which is the proper spelling of "nonstop?" nonstop or non stop or non-stop
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Which animals can and can't be prefixed with “she-”?

I've heard of "she-wolf" (partially from mythology, partially from pop music), and I'm wondering which animals "she-" can and can't be used on. Wiktionary mentions a variety of animals (she-ass, ...
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What are antonym-like prefixes to the Greek “crypto”?

What is a prefix that is similar to "public", or "accessible", or "ubiquitous" such that it is harmonious with the spirit of currency needing to be of public domain, widely adopted, accessible, etc. ...
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Why is there a negation of “ability” but not a negation of “agility”?

Would like to know what is the reasoning behind the use of some prefixes for example if one were to use "un-"able as opposed to "dis-"able the situational context is understood yet the same does not ...
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Proper term for knowing four or more languages?

If bilingual means you know two languages, and trilingual means you know three, what would be the proper term for knowing four, five or even six languages?
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An antonym for 'sought-after'

Whenever describing something that is seldom looked for or desired I often verbalise it with "ill sought after" without hesitating. (ignore that ill is its own word, the trouble I'm having writing it ...
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Should I say “declutter” or “unclutter”?

Which verb is more appropriate (and older) for clearing out my desk: declutter or unclutter and why? I should declutter my desk I should unclutter my desk Dictionary.com defines ...
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I need a word for my obscure phobia for hard, smooth structures

If I let myself, I become upset and a bit terrified by smooth hard structures. A good example is the most perfect sphere in the world, seen here. It's a polished sphere of solid silicon-28. The metal ...
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5answers
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What is the antonym of the prefix retro-?

A coworker and I are discussing the word "retromingent", which means urinating backwards. We are wondering what the opposite would be: the word that means urinating forwards. What is the opposite of ...
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How can pre be used

What are rules or style guidelines when adding "pre" to the beginning of words. I know that this called a prefix and that illustrates my point. How/when can pre be attached without a hyphen? ...
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1answer
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Why are numbers associated with shapes and nomials so complicated?

I was reading up a bit on the wiki page "Numeral Prefix" and realized that the monos, bis, and tris etc. prefixes of nomials, and the hexa, poly, and nanos etc. of shapes are all mixed around amongst ...
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Logical meaning of the word “understand”

To understand something means to be aquainted with it, to know it very well, know how it "ticks". This is one of the basic words that has a direct "meaning" in mind. However, if we "dissect" it, is ...
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Why does “quadratic” describe second power when “quad” means “four”?

In mathematics, quadratic means "involving the second and no higher power of an unknown quantity or variable". But the prefix quad- usually describes something that has to do with four, such as ...
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semi-business-related?

I'm writing my statement of purpose for grad school application. I would like to express "I came from an academic background that is half business-related", as I majored in E-business. What is the ...
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1answer
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Un-(adjective) but In-(noun) — does it ever go the other way?

Many pairs of words use un- as a prefix for the preferred adjective but in- as a prefix for the preferred noun (e.g. unstable/instability, unequal/inequality, unable/inability, unjust/injustice, ...
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1answer
120 views

difference between the prefix “un” and “not” [closed]

is there any plausible way to seperate the semantics of undefined - not defined or undetermined - not determined ?
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2answers
115 views

Why don't we say things are pervious?

Why is the word "pervious" uncommon to the point of being considered a spelling error, but "impervious" is extremely common? For the record, it is a word, apparently. Dictionary.com defines it as: ...
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Negative prefixes: Why impossible but unpleasant?

I know that the negative prefix im- is used before b, m, p as an assimilation of the prefix in-. Then why can't we say imbelievable, inpleasant or inpredictable but we use unbelievable, unpleasant and ...
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Logically, could the word “University” mean the opposite of “Diversity”?

DI- twice; two-; double. DI-VERSE: showing a great deal of variety; very different. DI-VERS-ITY: the state of being diverse; variety. UNI- one; having or consisting of one. While, by ...
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Prefix im- is for opposite or asserting

Is the prefix im- used in a negative sense, as in, the opposite of the word following it, e.g. Impenitent = "not penitent" Or it is used in the positive sense that supports the word following ...
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1answer
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Use of the prefix Im- [closed]

I have read the rules for using im- versus un- and agree with the general ideas put forth. A word that I used recently, seems to fall into a category all its own. The word is (im)provable, meaning ...