A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'

Question in Short: Why is it that the terms valuable and invaluable mean almost the same thing while the terms famous and infamous are almost semantically opposite in meaning? That is, one is used to ...
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2answers
729 views

How do I address an envelope where one person has a professional title but their spouse does not? [closed]

When addressing an envelope to Dr John Smith and his wife, Jane Smith, what would be the proper form to utilize? I have been using "Dr. and Mrs. John and Jane Smith", but I was told by my co-worker ...
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62 views

Why doesn't the prefix 'in-' mean the same in “invaluable” and “infamous” as it does in “insufficient” and “incompetent”? [duplicate]

Looking at a Prefix/Suffix chart confirms that the prefix "in-" is supposed to mean 'not' or 'without', just wondering why the exception only occurs for certain words. I don't know if it's an origin ...
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305 views

Inconsecutive or nonconsecutive or …? [closed]

I want to say that the data is not like 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159 but can be 154, 156, 157, 159. How do I negate the word "consecutive"? I was not able to find it in the dictionary. I have found ...
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115 views

Why is “back-” used in “back-order”?

I understand the meaning of the term "back-order": The item is not available, and will be ordered when it becomes available again. But I can't quite figure out why the prefix "back-" is used, when in ...
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828 views

Is re a prefix in respect?

Is re a prefix in respect or just a part of the word? Any guidance on this would be appreciated?
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116 views

Why does unremitting mean going on without interruptions? [closed]

Why does unremitting mean going on without interruptions? Here I think un- means opposite. remit means "send back". So remitting means the action of remit. There seems no issue of whether ...
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2answers
85 views

Are “brim” and “rim” related in etymology? [closed]

Are "brim" and "rim" related in etymology? I remember there are some other words which have similar meanings after adding "b-" in their fronts. It seems as if "b-" is a prefix. But I can't recall ...
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355 views

What is the difference between these two types of negation?

What is the difference between:- Ali is rich,but he isn't happy. Ali is rich, but he is unhappy.
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750 views

Prefixes milli- and cent- used for years

The prefix "milli-" means "thousandth" (e.g. 1000 millimeters in 1 meter) and the prefix "kilo-" means "thousand" (e.g. 1 kilogram is 1000 grams). Why is the period of 1000 years called a ...
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Meaningless s- and f-?

I saw some words on etymonline, started with s-, which seems meaningless For example, slack actually means "lax". There are also other words, if you delete the starting letter s or f, they are still ...
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What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
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458 views

Understand prefix out-

From Merriam-Webster out- in a manner that is greater, better, or more than something else. in a manner that exceeds or surpasses and sometimes overpowers or defeats. e.g outmaneuver> Does ...
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2answers
641 views

prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?

I am looking for a prefix to express the meaning of something possibly belonging to a class / category, or being a candidate for the concept in question. For instance, a "[...]-solution" would be ...
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3answers
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What is the difference between the prefix iso and homo

I haven't found a ancient Greek site on stack exchange, so i hope it is ok to ask it here: What is the difference between 'iso-' and 'homo-'? Do they both mean 'same'? For example: isotope, isomer, ...
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Change of form of some (Latin) prefixes like ex-, ad- into ef-, a-: are there rules or conditions?

There are many cases of prefixes changing their forms. For example ex- can change to ef- in front of f, e.g. effusion. ad- becomes a- in front of b, e.g. abate. Are there some more general rules ...
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2answers
153 views

Using “not” versus the negation prefixes for negation

Let's take this sentence as an example He is able to move. Now, what is the best negation of that action between those two? He is not able to move. He is unable to move. And what ...
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2answers
809 views

How to understand “-metr-”, as a root?

-Metr-, as a root, from http://www.prefixsuffix.com/rootchart.php: metr: admeasure, apportion. E.g., metrics, asymmetric, parametric, telemetry "Admeasure, apportion" means distribution. So I ...
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3answers
14k views

“Not able to” vs. “unable to”

Which phrase is more suitable to convey one's inability to do something — "not able to" or "unable to"? For example, not able to join the meeting unable to join the meeting
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The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
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750 views

How does one capitalize words like “un-American”?

Google's dictionary lists it as "un-American" or "unAmerican" (which looks clumsy to me). Since American is a "demonym," I would usually capitalize it, so I feel compelled to capitalize "un-American" ...
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Opposite of 'for-' prefix

I understand that often the opposite of the 'for-' prefix is 'back-', ie. "forwards" and "backwards," "foreground" and "background." But what is the opposite of 'foreshadowing,' 'forgiven' or ...
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What prefix means “during”?

The prefixes "pre-" and "post-" refer to events before and after. For instance, "pre-season" and "post-season" or "pre-study" and "post-study". Is there a prefix fitting this pattern which means ...
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348 views

The prefix *sub*

The prefix sub appears in many words, such as subway and substantial. For subway, I take it as the way that is completely different from the way that I get used to. Moreover it is not the main way. ...
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Prefix or adjective meaning “one and a half”

Is there a prefix or adjective that means "one and a half", as "tri-" or "triple" is for "three"? The exact usage I have is to describe "18" in terms of a dozen. Where I live they've started making ...
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Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?

The root words in the examples below look fine even without a prefix: un + bearable ir + regular dis + able mis + fortune ... but not in these: pro + gress pro + mote Possibly, I ...
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Verb for removing from end or beginning [duplicate]

We use "append" and "prepend" for adding to the end and to the beginning respectivly. Is there a word for removing in same place
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Phe- prefix - etymology [closed]

What is the meaning, origin and usage of the "phe-" prefix? According to one source, it means "to speak".
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Prefix im- is for opposite or asserting

Is the prefix im- used in a negative sense, as in, the opposite of the word following it, e.g. Impenitent = "not penitent" Or it is used in the positive sense that supports the word following ...
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921 views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
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883 views

“para-” in words like “paraglider” and “parabrake”

As is well known, para-, meaning "alongside or beyond", is derived from Greek loanwords such as paraphrase and parasite, while, meaning "against", is derived from the Latin "be prepared" as in ...
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221 views

How did “replace” come to mean “put something in the place of”?

Replace has several meanings, but a common one is "to put something in the place of," as in, "After drinking your cola, I replaced it with a beer." The way in which replace, which seems to most ...
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Any connection between akimbo, askance and atremble?

I came across akimbo and askance today and wondered if they were related, with the opening 'a' signifying something. Apparently not: Akimbo — to stand "with hands on hips and elbows projecting ...
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“dis” and “un” prefixes for the word interest

For the word interest we can say: I am disinterested* in that topic. And it is correct. To be correct again we must use the prefix "un" if we choose to structure the sentence this way: That ...
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Sub edge, sub-edge or subedge?

In fields like geometry and numerical methods for solving differential equations we often use words like sub-face and sub-edge, referring to parts of a geometrical object. For instance, a cube has 6 ...
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614 views

Un-(adjective) but In-(noun) — does it ever go the other way?

Many pairs of words use un- as a prefix for the preferred adjective but in- as a prefix for the preferred noun (e.g. unstable/instability, unequal/inequality, unable/inability, unjust/injustice, ...
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Why does no dictionary carry the word 'non-affair', though all carry 'nonevent'?

I came across the word “non-affair” in Jeffery Archer’s novel Kane and Abel, which I just finished reading yesterday. The word appears in the following sentence (p. 544): “She couldn’t recall ...
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663 views

In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?

For half, I could use semi, demi, or hemi. While semi does mean "half", it sometimes has a connotation of "some". Demi is often found with French roots. According to this link, hemi is the least ...
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What is the difference between a “prefix” and a “combining form”?

According to ODO, mini- is classified as a combining form. How exactly is this different from a prefix (or an affix, in general)? Can combining forms also be prefixes?
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Synonyms for “extra-”

I'm looking for prefixes similar to extra- in the sense of 'outside of'. I'm attaching it to "mathematical" and in its context "extra-mathematical" or "extramathematical" can be misread as "very ...
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“pre-” and “post-”, but what about “suf-”?

Is there a prefix related to “suf-” the way “pre-” is related to “post-”? In my opinion, “pre-” seems to mean leading, “post-” means bringing up the rear (like a post script). “suf-” would seem to ...
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Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?

I just recently came across the word dispreferred in a linguistic document. I have never heard the word used before, rather I generally hear something like "preferred something else" in everyday ...
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Pre-design, design and post-design [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: If ‘pre’ is previous, ‘post’ is after, what is current? Pre-design, design and post-design. What is the right word that describes during the design (design that is ...
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516 views

What is the correct Latinate prefix for honey-eaters?

In English, a vegetarian who eats eggs and dairy products can be referred to as an ovo-lacto vegetarian. By the same token, could a person who eats honey but is otherwise vegan be meaningfully called ...
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487 views

Is “catenate” used in IT parlance?

When I was doing my IT degree in the 80s we learned that, in programming terms, concatenation was the act of joining two strings together. Recently I was reading a technical manual and came across ...
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When adding prefixes to noun phrases, should you hyphenate? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase When adding a prefix to a noun, I've been taught to usually ...
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What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
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Why is it that denuding something means you strip it rather than dress it?

When we denude something we strip it, like the branches of a tree. That seems a bit inverted to me, shouldn't it be to nude-something?
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How productive is the prefix “un-”?

Is it possible to use un- with new words such as sit, sleep, sad? I'm currently seeing many words (in programming) which use "un-" in the meaning of undoing something. For example, is it possible to ...
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2answers
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Hyphens after the prefixes “non-” and “anti-” in mathematics

Is there a convention when to attach the prefixes non- and anti- to mathematical terms using a hyphen and when without? One uses non-zero but also noncommutative. Likewise for anti-. I no longer ...