A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

3
votes
1answer
1k views

Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?

The root words in the examples below look fine even without a prefix: un + bearable ir + regular dis + able mis + fortune ... but not in these: pro + gress pro + mote Possibly, I ...
3
votes
3answers
168 views

Verb for removing from end or beginning [duplicate]

We use "append" and "prepend" for adding to the end and to the beginning respectivly. Is there a word for removing in same place
-2
votes
1answer
644 views

Phe- prefix - etymology [closed]

What is the meaning, origin and usage of the "phe-" prefix? According to one source, it means "to speak".
1
vote
1answer
653 views

Prefix im- is for opposite or asserting

Is the prefix im- used in a negative sense, as in, the opposite of the word following it, e.g. Impenitent = "not penitent" Or it is used in the positive sense that supports the word following ...
1
vote
1answer
584 views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
1
vote
1answer
617 views

“para-” in words like “paraglider” and “parabrake”

As is well known, para-, meaning "alongside or beyond", is derived from Greek loanwords such as paraphrase and parasite, while, meaning "against", is derived from the Latin "be prepared" as in ...
1
vote
1answer
150 views

How did “replace” come to mean “put something in the place of”?

Replace has several meanings, but a common one is "to put something in the place of," as in, "After drinking your cola, I replaced it with a beer." The way in which replace, which seems to most ...
4
votes
1answer
140 views

Any connection between akimbo, askance and atremble?

I came across akimbo and askance today and wondered if they were related, with the opening 'a' signifying something. Apparently not: Akimbo — to stand "with hands on hips and elbows projecting ...
0
votes
2answers
570 views

“dis” and “un” prefixes for the word interest

For the word interest we can say: I am disinterested* in that topic. And it is correct. To be correct again we must use the prefix "un" if we choose to structure the sentence this way: That ...
0
votes
1answer
75 views

Sub edge, sub-edge or subedge?

In fields like geometry and numerical methods for solving differential equations we often use words like sub-face and sub-edge, referring to parts of a geometrical object. For instance, a cube has 6 ...
8
votes
1answer
414 views

Un-(adjective) but In-(noun) — does it ever go the other way?

Many pairs of words use un- as a prefix for the preferred adjective but in- as a prefix for the preferred noun (e.g. unstable/instability, unequal/inequality, unable/inability, unjust/injustice, ...
1
vote
3answers
183 views

Why does no dictionary carry the word 'non-affair', though all carry 'nonevent'?

I came across the word “non-affair” in Jeffery Archer’s novel Kane and Abel, which I just finished reading yesterday. The word appears in the following sentence (p. 544): “She couldn’t recall ...
6
votes
3answers
409 views

In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?

For half, I could use semi, demi, or hemi. While semi does mean "half", it sometimes has a connotation of "some". Demi is often found with French roots. According to this link, hemi is the least ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between a “prefix” and a “combining form”?

According to ODO, mini- is classified as a combining form. How exactly is this different from a prefix (or an affix, in general)? Can combining forms also be prefixes?
1
vote
6answers
224 views

Synonyms for “extra-”

I'm looking for prefixes similar to extra- in the sense of 'outside of'. I'm attaching it to "mathematical" and in its context "extra-mathematical" or "extramathematical" can be misread as "very ...
0
votes
4answers
1k views

“pre-” and “post-”, but what about “suf-”?

Is there a prefix related to “suf-” the way “pre-” is related to “post-”? In my opinion, “pre-” seems to mean leading, “post-” means bringing up the rear (like a post script). “suf-” would seem to ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Is “dispreferred” a mainstream word in English?

I just recently came across the word dispreferred in a linguistic document. I have never heard the word used before, rather I generally hear something like "preferred something else" in everyday ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Pre-design, design and post-design [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: If ‘pre’ is previous, ‘post’ is after, what is current? Pre-design, design and post-design. What is the right word that describes during the design (design that is ...
5
votes
3answers
369 views

What is the correct Latinate prefix for honey-eaters?

In English, a vegetarian who eats eggs and dairy products can be referred to as an ovo-lacto vegetarian. By the same token, could a person who eats honey but is otherwise vegan be meaningfully called ...
5
votes
1answer
369 views

Is “catenate” used in IT parlance?

When I was doing my IT degree in the 80s we learned that, in programming terms, concatenation was the act of joining two strings together. Recently I was reading a technical manual and came across ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

When adding prefixes to noun phrases, should you hyphenate? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is it necessary to use a hyphen in writing a compound word? Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase When adding a prefix to a noun, I've been taught to usually ...
3
votes
4answers
1k views

What is the difference between “dewatering” and “unwatering”

This report on the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy refers to the process of removing water as unwatering. However, I always thought that this process was called dewatering. What, if any, is the ...
3
votes
4answers
184 views

Why is it that denuding something means you strip it rather than dress it?

When we denude something we strip it, like the branches of a tree. That seems a bit inverted to me, shouldn't it be to nude-something?
14
votes
4answers
2k views

How productive is the prefix “un-”?

Is it possible to use un- with new words such as sit, sleep, sad? I'm currently seeing many words (in programming) which use "un-" in the meaning of undoing something. For example, is it possible to ...
2
votes
2answers
671 views

Hyphens after the prefixes “non-” and “anti-” in mathematics

Is there a convention when to attach the prefixes non- and anti- to mathematical terms using a hyphen and when without? One uses non-zero but also noncommutative. Likewise for anti-. I no longer ...
7
votes
7answers
1k views

What is a prefix that means near?

For instance, if I were to describe someone as being *near-*carnivorous, I'm have the goal of depicting them as being a heavy meat eater that includes very few forms of non-meat based food in their ...
5
votes
5answers
16k views

Which is higher — “hyper-”, “ultra-” or “super-”? [closed]

According to OED, hyper-: over, beyond, over much, above measure ultra-: beyond super-: over, above, higher than They all have the meaning "higher than", but what is the order of ...
4
votes
4answers
199 views

To either revive or kill something

I'm wondering if there's a word out there for me. I think that a clever use of a prefix would do as well. So, to revive means to make alive, and to kill means to make dead. Is there a word that means ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Hyphens in verb construction containing prefix such as “re”

In semi-formal business writing in the United States, I often observe that writers tend to add a hyphen between a prefix and the root infinitive of verbs. In many of the cases, the resulting verb ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Non-lexical words

I like suffixes and prefixes. I am wondering if I can use new nonlexical words such as: Javasmith (-smith) Javamaniac (-maniac) (just like shoemania!!) Javaster (-ster) The main ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Words having two prefixes incorporated

There are prefixes of time and order (pre-, post-), of location (sub-, super-), for expressing the reversing of an action (de-, dis-), and go on. English words may take prefixes from one or two of ...
6
votes
3answers
4k views

Word for a person who knows two or three languages

A polyglot is a person who is fluent in many languages, but what do we call a person who is fluent in only two or three languages? Is bi-glot a proper term for this? I don't think the words ...
-3
votes
2answers
218 views

“bigamy” and “digamy”

bi‑  from Latin with the meaning of two. di‑  is the Greek counterpart of bi‑, with the same meaning of two. Are bigamy and digamy words with the same meaning. If not, why?
1
vote
2answers
229 views

How can you omit repetition of words with prefixes, e.g. “inputs and outputs”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Use of hyphens when writing repeated compound words that has common parts I am looking for a general way of shortening the repetition of words with prefixes like ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Using “non-” to prefix a two-word phrase

Does "non-" prefixed to a two word phrase permit another hyphen before the second word? If I want to refer to an entity which is defined as the negation of another entity by attaching "non-" it seems ...
15
votes
4answers
12k views

“Instable” or “unstable”?

From my experience, it seems that although unstable is more commonly used, instable is often preferred in engineering and scientific contexts, e.g. "aircraft instability", "instable algorithm". Are ...
5
votes
3answers
7k views

What is the difference between “Hept-” and “Sept-” prefixes?

As I understand it, both the prefixes "Hept-" and "Sept-" are used to indicate seven of something. We have examples of English words that use both: e.g. Heptathalon, Heptagon, Heptane vs ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“Reset” or “re-set”?

As far as I know there are two different meanings of the word "reset": to restore an object/value to a previous/initial state - that's the most widely use of the word;  to set the value/state a ...
6
votes
2answers
796 views

Difference between “pangalactic” and “transgalactic”?

I am building a game and trying to give some fancy names to some objectives in my game. So, I was wondering about the difference between the words pangalactic and transgalactic? Does any of them ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

in-able ? un-able?

Suffix -able adds meaning "being able" to a word. I know that. Prefix in- and un- mean "not" or some negative meaning. I know that. However, when it comes to mixing of these, I am confused. ...
0
votes
1answer
174 views

Prefixing a two-word technical term with “sub-”

I have the term "verification code" and need a term for a particular code that is part of it. Normally, if the term were only "code", I'd use "subcode". How would I correctly prefix "verification ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

intro- vs. intra-

I recently found out that “extrovert” is a misspelling and that it’s actually written extravert. That makes sense, because other words use the same prefix, e.g. extraordinary, extradite, etc., but ...
0
votes
2answers
297 views

Is a prefix any set of letters that could be the beginning of a word?

For example, is it accurate to say that unac is a prefix of unacceptable, or is un the only valid prefix? If it is not a prefix is there a word for what unac would be in the above case?
0
votes
4answers
862 views

Two cultures — “bicultural”, one culture —?

I am looking for a word that means that somebody only has one culture. For example, somebody immigrating from Country 1 to Country 2 would be bicultural. What is someone who has only one culture. I ...
7
votes
1answer
198 views

What are the correct spelling and regional distribution of “X, schmX” to indicate dismissiveness (e.g., “evidence, schmevidence”)?

There is a curious construct in American English in which a word is stated and then repeated with the prefix "schm-" or "shm-" in order to indicate the speaker's dismissive attitude toward a concern ...
3
votes
4answers
796 views

Is there a prefix for “infinite”?

I was looking for a prefix I could prepend to a word to mean an infinite amount of the thing the word describes. I eventually found someone with the same question, and since there were no answers, I ...
13
votes
7answers
4k views

Logical meaning of the word “understand”

To understand something means to be aquainted with it, to know it very well, know how it "ticks". This is one of the basic words that has a direct "meaning" in mind. However, if we "dissect" it, is ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Using the prefix “be-”?

I read somewhere that the prefix be- can be used as a causative and this got me thinking. Does this mean that because means to cause to cause or to make cause?
6
votes
2answers
596 views

What comes in between predecessor and successor?

I'd like a good word for "current item in a succession of items". Let's say I am looking ahead, towards my successor. Back behind me, I can also see my predecessor. What am I? I'd hate to use the ...
4
votes
0answers
362 views

I was wondering why there are multiple prefixes for the same meaning [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why “unequal” but “inequality”? Origins of negative prefixes like in-, un-, il-, ir-, dis-, a- There are a lot of prefixes for meaning ...