A prefix is an affix which is placed before the stem of a word

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meaning of Republic [on hold]

I've been thinking what might be the real meaning of the word Republic? As far as I know the prefix re- gives the base word the meaning of again; as in renew, replace, reclaim. I am wondering what ...
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2answers
44 views

Is it ok to use Er. if a person is engineering degree holder

Its usual that we see doctors use Dr. Title, but I have also seen engineers use title - Er. Is this practise allowed, approved? I have seen few name boards like that in India.
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16answers
3k views

A word that means 'most important'?

I tried to find a single word that means "most important", but I couldn't. I want it to be able to express what's missing below: If you get hurt, the _ thing to do is to stay calm. It would ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Origin and usage of “nu-” (e.g. nu-metal)

Not every dictionary I checked has "nu-" but here are a few examples: nu- dictionary.com — indicating an updated or modern version of something: nu-metal music Bing — new: ...
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3answers
203 views

How to form this tag question?

We always use a positive tag question after a negative sentence: You shouldn't take this medicine, should you? We use a negative tag question after a positive sentence: She must leave early, ...
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2answers
88 views

Is there a gender-neutral prefix for “parent”?

The prefixes "patr-" and "matr-" refer, respectively, to father and mother--e.g., a patriarch is a father who rules a family, and a matrilineal society is one where property is passed from mother to ...
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1answer
61 views

confusion about the 'ch' sound [duplicate]

i am confused about using the "ch" as there are three sound starting with "ch" as-/k/sound, and like these. is there some important rules to find out word formation?.someone please help me.
4
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1answer
85 views

Pronunciation of the prefix “tri”

I know that English pronunciation is rather arbitrary. There are still some "rules" that even with many exceptions are useful for non-natives like me. I'm puzzled about the pronunciation of the very ...
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3answers
11k views

Why does “quadratic” describe second power while “quad” usually describes “four”?

In mathematics, quadratic means "involving the second and no higher power of an unknown quantity or variable". But the prefix quad- usually describes something that has to do with four, such as ...
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2answers
140 views

Should there be a hyphen in 're-rate'?

If you have already rated something and then you want to rate it again, what is the correct term? Rerate or Re-rate?
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2answers
229 views

Is there any dictionary that decomposes an English word into prefix, root, and suffix?

Is there any dictionary that shows the decomposition of each word into these three parts, if application at all? For instance, "incapable" is divided into prefix "in", root "cap", and suffix "able". ...
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0answers
108 views

How meanings of “dis” and “play” construct the meaning of word “display” [closed]

In what way do meanings of "dis" and "play" construct the meaning of word "display"? As I understand it, the prefix "dis" negates what follows e.g., disability, and disadvantage. But I can't quite ...
2
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1answer
258 views

Difference between the terms 'famous' & 'infamous'; 'valuable' & 'invaluable'

Question in Short: Why is it that the terms valuable and invaluable mean almost the same thing while the terms famous and infamous are almost semantically opposite in meaning? That is, one is used to ...
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2answers
112 views

How do I address an envelope where one person has a professional title but their spouse does not?

When addressing an envelope to Dr John Smith and his wife, Jane Smith, what would be the proper form to utilize? I have been using "Dr. and Mrs. John and Jane Smith", but I was told by my co-worker ...
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0answers
58 views

Why doesn't the prefix 'in-' mean the same in “invaluable” and “infamous” as it does in “insufficient” and “incompetent”? [duplicate]

Looking at a Prefix/Suffix chart confirms that the prefix "in-" is supposed to mean 'not' or 'without', just wondering why the exception only occurs for certain words. I don't know if it's an origin ...
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2answers
61 views

Inconsecutive or nonconsecutive or …? [closed]

I want to say that the data is not like 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159 but can be 154, 156, 157, 159. How do I negate the word "consecutive"? I was not able to find it in the dictionary. I have found ...
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3answers
76 views

Why is “back-” used in “back-order”?

I understand the meaning of the term "back-order": The item is not available, and will be ordered when it becomes available again. But I can't quite figure out why the prefix "back-" is used, when in ...
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2answers
246 views

Is re a prefix in respect?

Is re a prefix in respect or just a part of the word? Any guidance on this would be appreciated?
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2answers
57 views

Why does unremitting mean going on without interruptions? [closed]

Why does unremitting mean going on without interruptions? Here I think un- means opposite. remit means "send back". So remitting means the action of remit. There seems no issue of whether ...
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2answers
70 views

Are “brim” and “rim” related in etymology? [closed]

Are "brim" and "rim" related in etymology? I remember there are some other words which have similar meanings after adding "b-" in their fronts. It seems as if "b-" is a prefix. But I can't recall ...
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1answer
207 views

What is the difference between these two types of negation?

What is the difference between:- Ali is rich,but he isn't happy. Ali is rich, but he is unhappy.
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2answers
300 views

Prefixes milli- and cent- used for years

The prefix "milli-" means "thousandth" (e.g. 1000 millimeters in 1 meter) and the prefix "kilo-" means "thousand" (e.g. 1 kilogram is 1000 grams). Why is the period of 1000 years called a ...
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2answers
164 views

Meaningless s- and f-?

I saw some words on etymonline, started with s-, which seems meaningless For example, slack actually means "lax". There are also other words, if you delete the starting letter s or f, they are still ...
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2answers
788 views

What's the difference between “ex-” and “former” [closed]

Is there any real difference in usage between ex- and former?
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1answer
211 views

Understand prefix out-

From Merriam-Webster out- in a manner that is greater, better, or more than something else. in a manner that exceeds or surpasses and sometimes overpowers or defeats. e.g outmaneuver> Does ...
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2answers
330 views

prefix for “possible”, “supposed”, “potential” etc.?

I am looking for a prefix to express the meaning of something possibly belonging to a class / category, or being a candidate for the concept in question. For instance, a "[...]-solution" would be ...
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3answers
420 views

What is the difference between the prefix iso and homo

I haven't found a ancient Greek site on stack exchange, so i hope it is ok to ask it here: What is the difference between 'iso-' and 'homo-'? Do they both mean 'same'? For example: isotope, isomer, ...
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3answers
616 views

Change of form of some (Latin) prefixes like ex-, ad- into ef-, a-: are there rules or conditions?

There are many cases of prefixes changing their forms. For example ex- can change to ef- in front of f, e.g. effusion. ad- becomes a- in front of b, e.g. abate. Are there some more general rules ...
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2answers
113 views

Using “not” versus the negation prefixes for negation

Let's take this sentence as an example He is able to move. Now, what is the best negation of that action between those two? He is not able to move. He is unable to move. And what ...
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2answers
190 views

How to understand “-metr-”, as a root?

-Metr-, as a root, from http://www.prefixsuffix.com/rootchart.php: metr: admeasure, apportion. E.g., metrics, asymmetric, parametric, telemetry "Admeasure, apportion" means distribution. So I ...
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1answer
3k views

“Not able to” vs. “unable to”

Which phrase is more suitable to convey one's inability to do something — "not able to" or "unable to"? For example, not able to join the meeting unable to join the meeting
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232 views

The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
7
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1answer
389 views

How does one capitalize words like “un-American”?

Google's dictionary lists it as "un-American" or "unAmerican" (which looks clumsy to me). Since American is a "demonym," I would usually capitalize it, so I feel compelled to capitalize "un-American" ...
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1answer
912 views

Opposite of 'for-' prefix

I understand that often the opposite of the 'for-' prefix is 'back-', ie. "forwards" and "backwards," "foreground" and "background." But what is the opposite of 'foreshadowing,' 'forgiven' or ...
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5answers
1k views

What prefix means “during”?

The prefixes "pre-" and "post-" refer to events before and after. For instance, "pre-season" and "post-season" or "pre-study" and "post-study". Is there a prefix fitting this pattern which means ...
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1answer
107 views

The prefix *sub*

The prefix sub appears in many words, such as subway and substantial. For subway, I take it as the way that is completely different from the way that I get used to. Moreover it is not the main way. ...
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7answers
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Prefix or adjective meaning “one and a half”

Is there a prefix or adjective that means "one and a half", as "tri-" or "triple" is for "three"? The exact usage I have is to describe "18" in terms of a dozen. Where I live they've started making ...
3
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1answer
845 views

Are prefixes, as bound morphemes, always separable from their root words?

The root words in the examples below look fine even without a prefix: un + bearable ir + regular dis + able mis + fortune ... but not in these: pro + gress pro + mote Possibly, I ...
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3answers
145 views

Verb for removing from end or beginning [duplicate]

We use "append" and "prepend" for adding to the end and to the beginning respectivly. Is there a word for removing in same place
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1answer
522 views

Phe- prefix - etymology [closed]

What is the meaning, origin and usage of the "phe-" prefix? According to one source, it means "to speak".
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1answer
490 views

Prefix im- is for opposite or asserting

Is the prefix im- used in a negative sense, as in, the opposite of the word following it, e.g. Impenitent = "not penitent" Or it is used in the positive sense that supports the word following ...
1
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1answer
409 views

Sub-classification or subclassification? [closed]

We’re debating this at work. Merriam-Webster says it’s “subclassification”. Dictionary.Reference.com allows “sub-classification” and “subclassification” Is there a ‘more correct’ word to use? ...
1
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1answer
526 views

“para-” in words like “paraglider” and “parabrake”

As is well known, para-, meaning "alongside or beyond", is derived from Greek loanwords such as paraphrase and parasite, while, meaning "against", is derived from the Latin "be prepared" as in ...
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1answer
121 views

How did “replace” come to mean “put something in the place of”?

Replace has several meanings, but a common one is "to put something in the place of," as in, "After drinking your cola, I replaced it with a beer." The way in which replace, which seems to most ...
3
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1answer
127 views

Any connection between akimbo, askance and atremble?

I came across akimbo and askance today and wondered if they were related, with the opening 'a' signifying something. Apparently not: Akimbo — to stand "with hands on hips and elbows projecting ...
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2answers
346 views

dis an un prefixes for the word interest

For the word interest we can say: I am disinterested* in that topic. And it is correct. To be correct again we must use the prefix "un" if we choose to structure the sentence this way: That ...
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1answer
61 views

Sub edge, sub-edge or subedge?

In fields like geometry and numerical methods for solving differential equations we often use words like sub-face and sub-edge, referring to parts of a geometrical object. For instance, a cube has 6 ...
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1answer
389 views

Un-(adjective) but In-(noun) — does it ever go the other way?

Many pairs of words use un- as a prefix for the preferred adjective but in- as a prefix for the preferred noun (e.g. unstable/instability, unequal/inequality, unable/inability, unjust/injustice, ...
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3answers
161 views

Why does no dictionary carry the word 'non-affair', though all carry 'nonevent'?

I came across the word “non-affair” in Jeffery Archer’s novel Kane and Abel, which I just finished reading yesterday. The word appears in the following sentence (p. 544): “She couldn’t recall ...
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3answers
376 views

In English, is there an established prefix for “mostly”?

For half, I could use semi, demi, or hemi. While semi does mean "half", it sometimes has a connotation of "some". Demi is often found with French roots. According to this link, hemi is the least ...