Questions about the possessive, one of several constructions that describe ownership or association between two objects.

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Use of possessive adjectives in English

When an Englishman wants to refer to parts of the body or to objects of personal use, he will use a possessive adjective. Examples: My head aches. I dropped my glasses. In the Romance ...
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3answers
389 views

Question about dual possesive nouns [duplicate]

I am writing a technical letter for my (and my lab partner’s) senior design project (we are engineering majors) and I would like some help on properly phrasing part of the letter. The project belongs ...
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2answers
20k views

Which is correct “women's clothing” or “womens clothing”? [duplicate]

When I typed the search into Google most of the responses were websites selling clothing and the ratio of womens versus women's was about 1:1. Searching for mens versus men's and the version with ...
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1answer
1k views

Use of an Apostrophe in Maths Place Values

In mathematics, when you're discussing the concepts behind different number bases, it's often necessary to refer to a digit's place. For example, in the following "base 10" number (the number system ...
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1answer
417 views

Possessive s, apostrophe on end or not?

I am writing a project for college about smart phones. Which would you say is correct in a possessive context? Windows Phone's applications or Windows Phone' applications My thoughts say ...
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1answer
208 views

Ellipsis in noun phrases with possessive case [closed]

Can you omit the second occurrence of the word "poems" in a sentence like the following? I like Lord Byron's poems, and also enjoy a number of Percy Shelley's [poems].
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2answers
2k views

“Me and Joey's” or “mine and Joey's” [duplicate]

Which of the following should I use? Today is me and Joey's anniversary Today is mine and Joey's anniversary
3
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3answers
551 views

Is it ok to omit a possessive apostrophe before a capitalized appellation (President, country name, VP, PM)?

In a recent Financial Times article (Yemen PM Escapes Assissnation), the apostrophe necessary to show possession was left out. I've seen colleagues do it as well. Isn't it supposed to be "Yemen's PM ...
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2answers
256 views

“My friend's, Tom's, object” vs. “My friend, Tom's, object”

How does one combine possession and appositive comma usage in one sentence?
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3answers
168 views

Use of “my” and “your” when referring user's data [closed]

When displaying menu options to a user on a website. When should I label links as My Profile or Your Profile I have several other links such as <My/Your> Likes and <My/Your> ...
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2answers
172 views

Confusion with possessives

We have a choir in the town of Ako called Ako International Students Choir. The choir is directed in English and is indeed international, but by no means limited to International Students. I am ...
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2answers
276 views

One's or ones possesive noun or not? [duplicate]

It is my first question on any stackoverflow site, so sorry if I have not researched the current available questions and answers enough (I tried), but I have thoroughly searched both the internet and ...
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3answers
989 views

“Shooting themselves in the foot/feet”: Which is preferred?

To “shoot oneself in the foot” is to do something harmful to oneself by accident. How should this phrase be worded to apply to several people? This is provided to stop people from shooting ...
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3answers
4k views

Why is it “Paris’s cafés” but “Massachusetts’ capital”?

I’ve been studying the apostrophe and found this in Merriam-Webster’s Guide to Punctuation and Style: The possessives of proper names are generally formed in the same way as those of common nouns. ...
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2answers
345 views

Investors assets or Investor's assets? [closed]

I am wondering about which sentence is correct? It is therefore measuring the volatility of an investors asset. or It is therefore measuring the volatility of an investor's asset.
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2answers
1k views

“When I was in third year at the University”.: Is “my” necessary here like “in my third year”"

Is "my" really necessary in this sentence : " When I was (in third year,in MY third year) at the university" .If it is then why do we need to use 'my'?
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1answer
9k views

Which one is correct “et al.’s” or “et al.”?

I want to use the possessive noun form with et al. as in et al.'s versus et al.
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1answer
80 views

When a name finishes in “s” can you say Jaume Casals's biography? [duplicate]

Is this sentence correct? Here you can find Jaume Casals's biography. I think the final " 's " is unnecessary, but I am not 100% sure. Could anyone help? Thanks.
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3answers
297 views

What's the genitive of “someone else”?

This is Konrad. He has a dog. Hence, it's Konrad's dog. This is someone else. He has a cat. Hence it's someone else's cat. Hence it's someone's else cat. Hence it's someones else cat. Hence it's ...
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1answer
894 views

What happens when baker's, butcher's, etc. are in the plural?

If the singular it is: The baker's and the butcher's are closed on Sundays. Which one is the plural? Bakers and butchers are closed on Sundays. Bakers' and butchers' are closed on ...
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1answer
1k views

Is it “the business'” or “the businesses” responsibility?

It's quite common in my company to make a distinction between "the business" and "the IT department". I think this is the correct way to write what I want: "It is the business' responsibility to set ...
3
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2answers
165 views

How to correctly refer to animal parts as food?

I have found little consistent in how animal parts used as food are named. How can I correctly refer to the tongue of ducks, the necks of ducks, or the ears of pigs? Do you like duck's neck? ...
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2answers
1k views

Should this noun used in a possessive sense be singular or plural?

Consider the following comment in a C++ source file: /* These members are documented with their associated property. */ Should the word property be singular or plural? Each member is associated ...
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2answers
339 views

How is “I'm sick of something” grammatically correct?

How is "I'm sick of something" grammatically correct? The "of" operator seems to denote ownership. The capital of america is DC. So how does "sick of" or something similar work?
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2answers
458 views

Forbes' or Forbes's [duplicate]

Is it correct to say "Forbes' building was sold to NYU" or "Forbes's building was sold to NYU" ? Or perhaps both are correct?
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1answer
659 views

When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?

I'm reading Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and I notice that she invariably uses an apostrophe with possessive pronouns — in a way that would be considered incorrect now. For example: (Elinor is ...
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1answer
113 views

Questions about the subtleties of the genitive case

The AP style guide suggests that things like "Farmers Markets" or "Veterans Cemeteries" cannot "belong" to the members of the groups for which they were set up. I would posit that a thing for the use ...
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1answer
2k views

your/yours, her/hers etc [duplicate]

I am if sure if this sentence sounds correct or not, "you can tell Rachel that your and her hunch was right" For some reason my brain wants me to change the 'your' to 'yours'. Also should the 'hunch ...
3
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1answer
5k views

When do we use “of” rather than “ 's” to show possession? [duplicate]

It is a very simple word but I am quite confused when I write formal documents. I do not know exactly when to use the of rather than 's. For example: The value of the mean or The mean's value. ...
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2answers
334 views

“both of” + possessive, which noun does “both of” refer to?

Both of the boy's parents were happy with the new school. Is it proper English to say "both of the boy's parents", as in the above sentence, to mean "both parents of the boy"? Or do we have to ...
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1answer
163 views

Use of the possessive apostrophe [closed]

Consider a person whose name is "Lehman". In the sentence "I read Lehman's documents." why is it "Lehman's" and not "Lehmans' " ?
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2answers
466 views

How does one write the possesive form of stock ticker symbols ending in “s”?

How does one write the possessive form of stock ticker symbols ending in "s"? These are neither acronyms nor initialisms (/TLAs). For instance, does one write RAS' earnings, or RAS's earnings?
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1answer
339 views

How to Construct an Unambiguous Joint Possessive that Follows a Verb?

How to Construct an Unambiguous Joint Possessive that Follows a Verb? I've read that when writing about multiple possessors who jointly posses a thing, the common practice is to add a Saxon-genitive ...
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1answer
322 views

Attributive or Possessive noun

In the following is it better to use a possessive noun with an apostrophe or an attributive noun without an apostrophe? The following list details the assumptions that have been made in ...
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1answer
10k views

Singular/plural possessive form of fish? [closed]

The singular form of fish is fish. The plural form of fish is also fish. What are their possessive forms?
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1answer
246 views

Job title + possessive case [duplicate]

Is the following construct (grammatically) correct? Swiss mathematician and physicist Leonhard Euler's contribution to number theory was [...] It sounds clumsy to me; however, this rewrite sounds ...
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2answers
4k views

Plural possessive with compound subject [duplicate]

Which of the following is correct? John and Becky's knowledge John's and Becky's knowledge
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1answer
1k views

Saxon Genitive vs. Adjective Noun (Model Parameters vs. Model's Parameters)

The suggestions in this same forum say that the use of the phrase "the car's antenna" is correct. Questions: Nobody mentioned the use of "the car antenna" -- which to me would be much more natural, ...
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1answer
88 views

“Near St. John's church” vs. “near the St. John's church” vs. “near the St. John church” [duplicate]

When it comes to churches and so on, which one is correct? Our hotel is near St. John's church. Our hotel is near the St. John's church. Our hotel is near the St. John church.
3
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1answer
557 views

Name, Conditions, and Pluralization of “Conscience' sake”

In some versions of the Bible, 1 Cor. 10:25 contains the phrase conscience' sake with no s following the possessive apostrophe of conscience, which does not end with s, as in: New American ...
3
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1answer
396 views

Gerund preceded by a genitive?

Is this sentence actually grammatical? You know your having a rough day when kittens don't even make you smile. The writer of this sentence may intend to mean you're instead of your but I'm just ...
0
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1answer
156 views

How to denote possession with “Bureau of Statistics” [duplicate]

When denoting possession with Bureau of Statistics, does one use "Bureau's of Statistics" or "Bureau of Statistics'"? E.g. according to the Bureau's of Statistics Consumer Price Index ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Apostrophe Usage with Arkansas [duplicate]

Currently, we are having an issue at work where we may not be able to tack on apostrophes to words programmatically, in order to make them possessive, because of certain edge cases; such as Arkansas' ...
3
votes
1answer
483 views

Origin of plurals and possessives

What is the origin of English plurals and possessives? English plurals look more French plurals, but I am not sure that is where they come from. As for possessives, I don't know where they come from.
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1answer
161 views

Attribute of multiple entities

Which is the correct form of an attribute related to multiple entities? For example, which is the correct form of position? The position of the circle and of the square is wrong. The ...
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2answers
283 views

“Whomever runs it's” or “whomever runs its”?

I know that "its" is the possessive form of "it", but does this rule apply to the possessive form of phrases ending in "it"? Should I say, "the program runs on whomever runs its computer" or "the ...
2
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2answers
166 views

Does your name belong to you?

I'm having trouble deciding whether the word 'name' can be used possessively. Currently I'm thinking it's correct to say: Patients' names have been altered to provide anonymity However it just ...
3
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1answer
80 views

Should I answer the phone with “Mr. Beltz’s office” or “Mr. Beltz’ office”?

How would you pronounce the following when answering a phone for a boss whose last name is Beltz? Some people are saying Mr. Beltz’s office, pronouncing the extra s, and someone else thinks you should ...
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2answers
4k views

Possessives of a title in italics

If one writes a word in italics, say the name of a movie, and wants to put apostrophe s at the end to form the possessive, is the apostrophe s italicised with the title? Chinatown's or Chinatown's?
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1answer
11k views

Apostrophes and s’s [duplicate]

I always forget the rule about if something is possessive put 's at the end, for example "the sailor's hat". I know some people say to remember because it has a different meaning if it's plural (e.g. ...