0
votes
1answer
33 views

My and Linda's or Mine and Linda's? [duplicate]

How do you use possessive pronouns in cases where there are multiple "owners" and "objects" in question? For example would it be: "I've included my and Linda's suggestions in the file" or "I've ...
1
vote
2answers
51 views

Posessive of multiple objects by one Noun and one pronoun

*As far as I can tell, not a duplicate of either of these two similar questions. Very close (maybe duplicate, but I don't quite think so) of this question. I want to construct a sentence, where ...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

I get so confused in possessive pronouns [duplicate]

Can you please correct these sentences. 1.Can I click a picture of yours. 2.Do you know the email address of John's? 3.I think of both of yours betterment. 4.You are a friend of John's.
1
vote
1answer
542 views

“My one” vs Mine

I've heard someone say "Here's my one" instead of "Here's mine". Is the former grammatical? It seems like it's a shortcut for "Here's one that is mine".
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Is this usage correct: “my [verb]” [duplicate]

I have been thinking of this sentence: All these factors culminated in my choosing [some life decision]. Is the usage of my choosing correct?
1
vote
1answer
140 views

Possessive pronouns in research papers [closed]

Contrast: In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and their corresponding Fourier transforms... with In order to develop a relationship between the energy spectra and ...
7
votes
1answer
233 views

The significance of “y”

Regarding the pronoun "your", ignoring the singular possessive form. Is there some significance to the "prefix" y or is this a coincidence? Our: Collective possession, including me. Y our: ...
9
votes
1answer
415 views

When did it become incorrect to use apostrophes with possessive pronouns?

I'm reading Jane Austen's Sense and Sensibility, and I notice that she invariably uses an apostrophe with possessive pronouns — in a way that would be considered incorrect now. For example: (Elinor is ...
1
vote
2answers
124 views

Antedecent of “its” in “the dog attacked the cat and its friends” [duplicate]

The dog attacked the cat and its friends. Does the sentence imply that the dog attacked the cat and the cat's friends or that it attacked the cat and the dog's friends? How would one properly ...
-1
votes
2answers
426 views

About adjective possessive pronouns [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? In the sentence ‘Everyone should make everyone’s part’, what adjective ...
0
votes
4answers
8k views

“my”, “of me”, “of mine” - when to use these possessive constructions

I have been encountering possessive constructions with the preposition "of" and a possessive form of pronoun frequently, but I do not fully understand what it means and when to use it. In particular, ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter ...
14
votes
4answers
14k views

“Its” as a Possessive Pronoun

Since its can be both determiner possessive pronoun and nominal possessive pronoun, an example of its as determiner possessive pronoun would be: We saved this question for last because of its ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Use of possessive or object pronoun [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: When is a gerund supposed to be preceded by a possessive pronoun? Do you mind me smoking? Do you mind my smoking? There's little chance of you ...
2
votes
3answers
388 views

“Whom” or “who” and replies to such questions

Which is the most natural way to ask the question below? Are the replies correct? (Words in parentheses show that they are optional.) Whose are these notebooks? - (Of) our students./These ...
3
votes
1answer
477 views

What's the right possessive pronoun for “nobody”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Is there a correct gender-neutral, singular pronoun (“his” versus “her” versus “their”)? None as plural indefinite pronoun Should ...
3
votes
3answers
392 views

Can “whose” refer to a first-person subject in the third person?

This question came from a friend. It is from a college entrance exam for non-native English speakers. Link the following sentences with "whose": I was a small kid. My classmates laughed at ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

What possessive pronouns do have an apostrophe?

I was explaining it's vs. its to someone the other day, and I said "None of the pronouns (his, hers, theirs, yours, its, whose, ...) has an apostrophe." Later I got to wondering whether that was ...
4
votes
2answers
292 views

Why do we use “its” for possessive? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Why doesn't “its” have an apostrophe? Generally, there is an apostrophe when someone possesses something: That's Gerald's cat. Gerald's cat is ...
6
votes
1answer
941 views

Why do we say “of mine/of his” instead of “of me/of him”?

He's a friend of mine. That's a car of his. Why do we use the possessive when the meaning would be the same while not using it (e.g. a friend of me and a car of him)? I thought maybe it is ...
4
votes
1answer
5k views

Proper way to handle plurals with “whose”

I came up (re)phrasing a question like this : What's so special about directories whose name begins with a dot? But now, I'm wondering whether this is correct handling of plurals or not. Should ...
11
votes
3answers
13k views

How do you make the possessive form with “He and I”-style subjects?

Despite being a native speaker of American English, I cannot find a construction that sounds natural when trying to form a possessive from coordinated subjects including a first person pronoun, like ...
1
vote
1answer
432 views

Third person equivalent of “yours” and “mine” [closed]

What is the third person equivalent of yours or mine? For example, It's not your book; you should take yours. It's not my book; I should take mine. It's not his book; he should take X.
8
votes
1answer
789 views

What is the possessive form of “y'all”?

I generally hear y'alls's used as the possessive form, but I have also heard yourn. Since y'all is a colloquial pronoun, its possessive form is basically liberated from prescriptive linguistics which ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

Why “themselves” and “himself”

In the earliest grades of elementary schools, students learn that "hisself" and "theirselves" are not words. I do not understand why this is. If you wanted to refer to 'his' sock, you would say "his ...
0
votes
1answer
624 views

How do we pronounce “others'”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the correct possessive for nouns ending in s? I know that we pronounce "someone else's" as "someone else sus." I'm wondering how do we pronounce others'. Is it ...
17
votes
1answer
9k views

Ones or one's: Which is the correct usage?

I've been confused about this as long as I can remember. Should it be: One should do ones duty. or One should do one's duty. I'm guessing it should be the latter. But that doesn't sit well ...
4
votes
2answers
735 views

Ambiguity when a sentence contains multiple possessive pronouns

I have a question related to another one that I have asked. In the following sentence, whose father is being referenced? Billy’s friend and his father were there. In the following re-structured ...
16
votes
4answers
7k views

Can “whose” refer to an inanimate object?

We lit a fire whose fuel was old timber wood. Is the word whose referring to fire, an inanimate object, correct in this sentence? Or is there a more appropriate word?
4
votes
6answers
3k views

Is [Its'] a word? (Note the apostrophe at the end.)

I just had a strange flashback to a conversation I had when I was in high school, with a man who was regarded by many members of a particular online community as having an impressive degree of ...
20
votes
3answers
6k views

Why doesn't “its” have an apostrophe?

I know that its is the possessive and it's is the contraction, and know when to use them. But why doesn't the possessive have an apostrophe? "The bear's eating a fish." [contraction] "The bear's ...
2
votes
1answer
826 views

Usage of “whose” not referring to a person [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Referring to some attribute of an inanimate object — use “who's”? I noticed the use of "whose" in the following sentence I wrote does not refer to a ...
8
votes
6answers
3k views

Difference in pronunciation between “your” and “you're”?

I'm a native English speaker (Texas counts, I suppose), and I pronounce "your" to rhyme with "core", and "you're" to rhyme with "cure". Is it just me or did I pick this up somewhere?
2
votes
6answers
321 views

“It's” versus “its” frequencies

My hypothesis is that in informal writing (say something like Stack Exchange questions) "it's" is massively more common than "its". Is this true? Are there any data to support it? Concrete ...
1
vote
3answers
929 views

Possessive for a third person and a first person

Bob and I are working on a project. I want to refer to "Bob's work" and "my work" collectively, without referring to Bob and myself collectively. (This will be the first reference to Bob and myself in ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

Origins of possessive pronouns

If apostrophe + s is the acceptable way of denoting a genitive in English, is it possible that possessive pronouns, such as hers, ours and yours, started life as possessive adjectives with apostrophe ...
2
votes
3answers
1k views

Can “his/her” be replaced by “his”?

Yesterday, I asked this question on Web Apps: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to the account? Actually, I wanted to ask it this way: If a Facebook user dies, what happens to ...
4
votes
0answers
393 views

What is the possessive form of “what”? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: 'Which', 'whose' or something else? First of all, I'm not a native speaker so I can't rely on my intuition in this specific case. For a very long time I ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Why use “his” in association with the word “mankind”?

I have a doubt. The economist Keynes in a book wrote: The power to become habituated to his surroundings is a marked characteristic of mankind. I would have used "its" instead but since English ...
2
votes
1answer
211 views

Which goal is whose?

Here is the situation: Kids in a small yard are about to play soccer. There are no goalposts in that yard (or "goals" or whatever you call it, I mean those metal frames on each side of the soccer ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

“You” or “your” when using two subjects with a possession?

I came across your and Mr X's publication or I came across you and Mr X's publication
5
votes
4answers
22k views

Correct usage of pronoun: “their” vs “its” [closed]

Which word goes in the blank (their or its)? The stones are small, but ___ value is great. I think it is their but my child's paper says it is its. Which is correct and why?
8
votes
2answers
498 views

*all of us's friend

There's this funny gap I tried to write a paper once upon a time when I studied linguistics, and I'd like to know if anyone has insight into it. The construction in question is the possessive ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Using “who” for things (nonliving beings)

On an online typing tutor site I came across the following phrase: We're now going to move on to words who's first letter originates on the top row. Can "who" normally be used in this way (to ...
4
votes
4answers
9k views

'Which', 'whose' or something else?

I would appreciate your help phrasing the following: I am looking for elements which/whose/... size/sizes is/are relatively large.
2
votes
1answer
531 views

Referring to some attribute of an inanimate object — use “who's”?

This came up in describing an input to a function: A handle to the daemon who's name is desired. (Daemon is a type of process on a system.) Somehow, "who's" just doesn't seem right because it's ...
4
votes
4answers
516 views

Are there cases where a possessive pronoun is omitted?

Are there cases where the possessive adjective is omitted in a sentence, or is it always used? For example, in a sentence like "Susan was walking with her hands in her pockets", is it necessary to ...