14
votes
3answers
792 views

What is the correct usage of the word “Cartesian”?

While working on an essay for my English class I included this sentence: The best solution is to take a page out of Cartesian theory and take a proven approach. However, my teacher corrected it ...
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Your Site Visitors or Your Site’s Visitors?

Your site/site’s visitors are very active. How is correct to write: your site visitors or your site’s visitors?
-1
votes
1answer
432 views

possessive form of nouns ending in “x” [duplicate]

Where a noun ends with the letter x, is it proper for the possessive form of the word to end with 's or simply ' ? Example 1: "It is Xerox' position that it owns the patent." vs. "It ...
1
vote
3answers
244 views

Question about dual possesive nouns [duplicate]

I am writing a technical letter for my (and my lab partner’s) senior design project (we are engineering majors) and I would like some help on properly phrasing part of the letter. The project belongs ...
0
votes
2answers
172 views

One's or ones possesive noun or not? [duplicate]

It is my first question on any stackoverflow site, so sorry if I have not researched the current available questions and answers enough (I tried), but I have thoroughly searched both the internet and ...
1
vote
1answer
189 views

Attributive or Possessive noun

In the following is it better to use a possessive noun with an apostrophe or an attributive noun without an apostrophe? The following list details the assumptions that have been made in ...
0
votes
1answer
780 views

Saxon Genitive vs. Adjective Noun (Model Parameters vs. Model's Parameters)

The suggestions in this same forum say that the use of the phrase "the car's antenna" is correct. Questions: Nobody mentioned the use of "the car antenna" -- which to me would be much more natural, ...
0
votes
1answer
171 views

Plural possessive of category? [closed]

Example Sentence: The children of the category. What does category become in this format: The categor(ies|ies'|y's) children?
0
votes
1answer
203 views

What will be the possessive form of the word “Tipsy” used as a noun? [closed]

The Microsoft Word grammar check shows "Tipsy's" to be wrongly formed. I thought "Tipsy'" would do the job and it was shown as correct. However, it occurred to me that Tipsy does not end in a 'z' or ...
1
vote
0answers
30 views

“Thank you for your coming” and “Thank you for your understanding” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “Thank you for coming” and “Thank you for your coming” The first one seems ungrammatical, as pointed by some of native speakers. But the latter ...
2
votes
2answers
7k views

Possessive plural of country? [closed]

Is it countries? Country's? I originally thought the latter but this would suggest a singular country?
2
votes
2answers
187 views

“Ear doctor's” vs “Ear doctor”

In one of Stephen King's books titled "On Writing" he writes: "The next week my mother called another taxi, we went back to the ear doctor's, and I found once more lying on my side with the absorbent ...
3
votes
3answers
909 views

Genitive case or noun as adjective

Is there any rule for when it is better to use genitive case or noun as adjective? I'm not sure if there is any difference in meaning in this example: The department of accounting The ...
2
votes
1answer
118 views

Proper use of possessives

If I wanted to talk about treasure owned by multiple explorers, how would I write it? The explorers' treasure. OR The explorer's treasure. Is the plural form of explorer considered ...
2
votes
1answer
314 views

“List of tasks” or “tasks' list”

Which of these forms is better: list of tasks or tasks' list? Another question is whether I should use an apostrophe or not (tasks's list vs tasks list). Other phrases which are similar to this, but ...
8
votes
3answers
40k views

“Today's assumption” or “todays assumption” — which is valid grammar?

We (non native English-speakers) are writing a paper and are wondering if the following construct is valid English: Yesterday's assumption is no longer valid. Specifically the apostrophe after ...
1
vote
1answer
257 views

Possessive of Queen's? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Possessive of a word that's already possessive? I ran into this issue today. Referring to Queen's University, how would you say "I've been accepted to Queen's MA ...
1
vote
2answers
19k views

How do you show possession with the word “year” (“year's” vs.“years”)?

So, I develop for a company that does workplace-surveys. And one of our report-formats has just been translated into English. And with it a description on how to read the reports. This description ...