This tag is for questions regarding the polite use of words or phrases.

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2
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3answers
653 views

What part of speech is “thank you”?

Can anybody please tell me the subject, verb, and object of this sentence: Thank you all for conducting a landmark experiment. I would also like to please know what part of speech thank you ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

How to reply when someone says 'you deserve this'

I always wonder if it is okay to reply with just a 'Thanks' when someone says 'you deserve this' or 'you have done a great job'. Can someone please advise me about whether saying 'Thanks' and leaving ...
2
votes
1answer
192 views

Etiquette in diplomatic use of the English language (pronunciation of names) [closed]

Does anyone know what the etiquette and usages are when two heads of state, both non-native English speakers, talk to each other in English during an official meeting? E.g. when an Italian head of ...
0
votes
4answers
147 views

Does “Could I …?” always sound more polite than “Can I …?”?

For example, if I say Could I borrow your pen? Does it sound more polite than Can I borrow your pen? I am not a native English speaker, but I rarely hear someone says "Could I ...?". Isn'...
0
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3answers
415 views

Mentally challenged as differently abled [closed]

Can we politely refer to somebody who is mentally challenged but leading an almost normal life upon professional support as differently abled?
0
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2answers
193 views

Is responding 'maybe' to an opinion or statement of fact rude?

When telling someone a statement of fact (i.e. something you know, without a doubt to be true), if they respond "maybe", which to me suggests the possibility that you are wrong, is this rude? ...
0
votes
2answers
140 views

How, as a parent, do I address a teacher (in the UK)?

In semi/non-official correspondence, how a parent should address a teacher of their children? Dear Miss Lastname, Dear Ms Lastname, Dear Firstname or something else? I know it's more about savoir-...
1
vote
3answers
748 views

Need polite phrases expressing disagreement with the information/conclusions of another person, especially an educator [closed]

My classmate told me I should always say, "With all due respect," or "I politely disagree," when disagreeing someone - especially an educator - in order to avoid being perceived as rude. For example: ...
0
votes
2answers
119k views

How to correctly use the expression “safe travel(s)”?

A colleague of mine recently reached out to me. I asked if he would like to meet up sometime to which he notified me that he would be traveling the remainder of this week. In what context is it okay ...
0
votes
2answers
464 views

“I was away for the weekend”

I work as a customer service representative in a software company. Sometimes I receive customer support questions during weekends. I check them on Monday. What is the correct way of saying that I wasn'...
1
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3answers
15k views

Good Luck **in** all your endeavors' versus Good Luck **to** all your endeavors'

What is the difference between 'I am currently busy with family stuff so I really don't know when is a good time to catch up. Good Luck in all your endeavors' versus 'I am currently busy with ...
0
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2answers
58 views

A more polite expression than “minor languages”

I am translating a text to English for a university describing a program aimed at multicultural literacy: Students acquire minor languages in addition to English. The above translation is no ...
1
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2answers
14k views

When someone leaves at 4pm - should I say “Have a good afternoon” or “evening”? [closed]

I started work as a receptionist and must greet people that come and go. Please let me know what I should say when it is 4 pm and the client is leaving. Should I say "Bye, have a nice afternoon" or "...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

How are you spelling, or how do you spell?

I have just given my surname to someone on the telephone, and they asked me as do most people these days How are you spelling the name? It always sounds as if they think I change my name every day and ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

How to reply to “you ok” in British? [closed]

I recently shifted in UK and started to work, here people always say "you ok?" When I am in kitchen or I am working and they pass by. How should i respond to it. Is it rude to simply say I m good or ...
0
votes
1answer
228 views

Polite/professional auto-acknowledgment email for support inquries

I am trying to create an auto acknowledgment email for support requests we receive. I want it to look polite and professional, but I find it a bit difficult to word properly since I am not a native ...
2
votes
0answers
103 views

How to politely say to sellers in stores that you don't need help? [closed]

This happens quite often. You're at a store, and while looking for clothes sellers come over and ask if you need any help. And since my English is far away from normal English I just use what I know ...
-1
votes
2answers
367 views

How to say thank you to a friend who agreed to take care of my pet? [closed]

I have been preparing to IELTS test and currently I need to write a thank you letter to my friend, because she agreed to take care of my pet. So I've come up with this: Thank you so much for ...
-1
votes
4answers
167 views

Word or phrase for people butting in and taking a side in an online conversation?

The phenomenon is not dissimilar to this: Word for "butting in on the Net", yet it wouldn't necessarily be considered trolling. Person A replies to a comment/post by Person B on the ...
1
vote
2answers
125 views

Past tense equivalent of “will do”

I suffer from spending inordinate amounts of time on email. Once in a while I get an email that I can respond to succinctly by saying, "Thanks for the suggestion -- will do." Suppose I respond to ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How to respond to “I'm sorry” appropriately

One thing that's been bugging me about English recently: Let's say I stole Joe's gym socks. Then a month later I went to Joe and said "I'm sorry I stole your socks." Joe's typical response would be "...
2
votes
2answers
866 views

Object pronoun: me and John, or John and me?

When using ourselves and another person as the subject of a sentence, we use their name first (like "John and I"); but when the same two people become the object of a sentence, which order should the ...
8
votes
1answer
424 views

Beginning a question with “Say,”?

Since English is not my native language, I have a hard time understanding some expressions I hear in movies. From what I gather, it's possible to start a question with "say", such as "Say, do you know ...
-1
votes
2answers
631 views

When to use “Do you mind…?” and when “Would you mind…?”

I know that "Would you mind… ?" (the Present Conditional) is more polite than "Do you mind…?" (the Simple Present), and also, that they have to be completed this way: "Do you mind if I do sth?/Would ...
22
votes
11answers
7k views

Why doesn't the English language have distinct words to use when talking to elders? [closed]

In many of the languages that I've studied there are separate distinctions in the words to use when talking to elders and when talking to someone of your age or younger. For e.g. in Hindi, if I ...
0
votes
1answer
94 views

How much is idiom “chew the fat” acceptable and neutral?

Does the idiom have strictly negative meaning or is it neutral? Can it be used to talk not only about close people so that not to insult anybody?
0
votes
1answer
255 views

“Good for Me!” as a response to someone doing something nice for you

I have done many nice things for a relative (e.g. reorganize the outdoor deck space) and upon seeing whatever I try & do nice for her she replies "Good for Me!" I find this offensive—am I ...
0
votes
2answers
285 views

Résumé: Additional details can be provided (if required / on request)

I'm a freshman applying for internships. I previously had a detailed résumé with appropriate information regarding my projects and areas of expertise. However, I want to tailor it down and keep it as ...
2
votes
1answer
928 views

Do “Care to do something” and “Would you care to do something” sound equally polite?

Today on one of other stackexchange sites I've been reached with following comment: "Care to add some references for your claims?". This sounds to me not only formal but a bit rude, so I've ...
0
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0answers
28 views

Is there a rule regarding the placement of “please” in a sentence? [duplicate]

Both written or spoken? For example: Please have a seat. Have a seat please. And how would the use of commas change the meaning or tone of the request? Are there other options that I've excluded?...
1
vote
1answer
388 views

Polite Answers to “What else can I do for you? ” [closed]

Suppose that I call a company's call center for help. And near the end of the conversation, the staff asks a question like "what else can I do for you ?". How can I give a polite answer to this sort ...
4
votes
2answers
753 views

What is happening to “Thank you”?

What is happening to the phrase "Thank you"? Related questions: Is thank you considered formal nowadays? Is thanks used more often? Is there a decline in the usage of the phrase thank you ...
-3
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2answers
200 views

The right word to show honour for president or such dignitaries while addressing them

what is the right word to show honour while addressing president or such dignitaries. Is "respected president" sufficient?
0
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2answers
5k views

How to respond to someone who says “Pleasure to meet you”, but you don't feel the exact same thing? [closed]

It is not that I hated meeting him, but it wasn't a "pleasure" either. Not because I have some problems with him but because I don't get usually enchanted when meeting someone for the first time. I ...
0
votes
1answer
222 views

Is “would you be keen to consider___?” too cheesy to use?

On a formal / professional email, is the following question acceptable, or is it too much politeness it looks unprofessional? The intention is to ask someone, who is not a subordinate, to do ...
0
votes
1answer
111 views

Does “No screenshots any more from your phone” sound rude? [closed]

Could native speakers tell the first expression of meaning "No screenshots any more from your phone" Does it sound rude?
5
votes
4answers
342 views

Which dialects of English consider “would” to be a polite form of “will”?

My recent trip to India exposed me to many sentences using "would" as a polite substitute for "will", as in Please make sure to leave on time. The last bus would depart at 8PM. Thanks for ...
3
votes
1answer
173 views

19th C forms of address

In the early 19th C. when the eldest daughter married, did the second oldest daughter become the "Miss Whatever," or did she continue to be identified as "Miss Whoever Whatever?'
0
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3answers
327 views

Non-vulgar way to express that you “f-word love” something

So I wanted to say that I really love some web service, (I could pretty much say this about stack exchange too!) and I wanted to keep the power of my words, but I have a bad habit of using f-word in ...
0
votes
1answer
680 views

Best use of wondering if “there was something” or “something was”

I would like to ask whether an object is included in a package or not, which of the following expressions should I use: I was wondering if there was any chassis support in the package? I was ...
0
votes
1answer
522 views

Ask politely if there is any fee for a training [closed]

I am attending a training, but they did not mention if it is free or not. How to ask politely if there is any fee for this training?
18
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7answers
8k views

Asking female employees to come to my room [closed]

I have a few female employees working at my office, and being a manager, I need to text them via Skype or Messenger to come to my room. How can I ask them politely to come? Please come to my room ...
3
votes
1answer
847 views

How to start and end an email politely? [closed]

I'm trying to write an email to professor because I found a mistake on his book. Should I start the email with just "Dear professor, There seems to be some problems in ..." and end the email as "best ...
-1
votes
1answer
246 views

Is mentioning full name on email replies considered offensive? [closed]

For example: If someone replies me "Sure Deepak Mishra :)" or "Sure Deepak :)". Should "Sure Deepak Mishra :)" look offensive to me or is it not a good email etiquette? Adding to this question: I ...
2
votes
6answers
2k views

Is there a politically correct term for illiterate people?

The question says it all. What is the standard, compassionate/politically-correct term for those who lack a literacy education? I'm looking for something a little higher in register and more accurate ...
4
votes
3answers
5k views

What does “talk to the hand” mean?

I saw the phrase "talk to the hand" on many funny stickers which seems like expressing the idea that you want to stop the topic or conversation which you feel uncomfortable or not interested in. But ...
0
votes
1answer
138 views

Removing offensiveness from swear word [closed]

Is there a consensus in terms of the ranking of offensiveness given by the word "damn" and its derivatives? Damn Darn Dang Ding (as in ding-busted) I assume that the less a word sounds like the ...
65
votes
7answers
17k views

What happened to “You're welcome?”

Quite often (9 out of 10 times?), on radio (NPR), when the interviewer says "Thank you" to the interviewee, the reply is also "Thank you." What has happened to "You're welcome?" Why is "You're ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Most Appreciated [closed]

I've received a nice comment from a friend, on a work of art that I posted on my Facebook page. I responded with "Most appreciated, amigo!" Is this an acceptable 'thank you'? Or should it be 'much ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Are the 'Imperatives' used without 'please' or 'kindly' considered to be rude in the west?

Are imperatives considered rude if they are used without "please" and "kindly"? For example: Go ahead OR Please, go ahead. and Give me the eggs OR Please, give me the eggs