Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

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Name for the practice of composing sentences for ease and clarity of pronunciation?

Is there a name for the practice of composing sentences in such a way that they don't contain proximate consonants which cause difficulty when read aloud? For example: Under this criteria, "dogs and ...
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What does “bright topaz denizens of a world of green” mean

Here is the extract from a poem "Aunt Jennifer's tigers" by Adrienne Rich- Aunt Jennifer's tigers prance across a screen bright topaz denizens of a world of green. They do not fear the men beneath ...
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Prolong the sound of a word in writing

...while maintaining its natural sound? I want to prolong the sound of these words: Doh Rei Mi Fah Sol If I write Doooooh, people might read it as "doooo-oh".
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Difference between meter and rhythm in poetry

What is the difference between meter and rhythm in poetry? The explanations found from googling were highly confusing.
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75 views

How do you refer to a 'they' character in a poem in a possessive sense?

I am writing a paper about Emily Dickinson's ‘They shut me up in Prose –.’ The two characters of the poem are the speaker and an unidentified group only referred to as 'they' and later as 'themself.' ...
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266 views

Etymology: “main” meaning sea or ocean

In Kipling's "The Land" he writes: Then did robbers enter Britain from across the Northern main And our Lower River-field was won by Ogier the Dane. Here "main" seems to mean sea, i.e. the ...
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What do you call an abrupt, abstract ending to a sentence?

While reading the poem Pike by Ted Hughes, I came across this line: The gills kneading quietly, and the pectorals. As you can see, the line ends quite abruptly. How would one term this literary ...
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55 views

What's does poetry mean in 'Leave the poetry in what you make'?

I'm reading Jason Fried's book Rework, and I don't understand what poetry means in these sentences: Pare down to the essence, but don't remove the poetry. Leave the poetry in what you make. ...
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473 views

A poetic/literary term for “Ice Age”? [closed]

Is there a poetic/literary term for "Ice Age" (besides "glacial epoch")?
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227 views

What is Poetry? What does not count as Poetry? [closed]

Background: a google "define:poem" did not give me much closure: poem: a piece of writing in which the expression of feelings and ideas is given intensity by particular attention to diction ...
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1answer
150 views

Are there any famous English poems that every British-raised or American-raised person knows? [closed]

In the Chinese language, there is a poem named Quiet Night Thoughts(Jing Ye Si) by Li Bai, which is known by everyone that is native to China (from little kids to very old people, even if they are ...
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What figure(s) of speech or expression are in play here?

I recently heard a somewhat poetic song lyric that I couldn't pin down. The writer says of a failed relationship: We broke a diamond with our bitter words. I get diamond as a metonym for ...
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Why don’t we write poetry like Beowulf any longer?

Beowulf, the Old English epic poem, uses a characteristically Germanic style of poetry in which the number of strong beats per line is what counts. Instead of counting syllables, strong beats alone ...
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147 views

Help with older English couplet

I was translating a text, but then the author quoted an old poem by an author named John Ball. I have seen it written in two different forms: "Be war or ye be wo; Knoweth your frend from your foo" ...
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65 views

Through wood and break and many a fertile field: what is “break”?

A poem from A Canterbury Tale (1944): Six hundred years have passed. What would they see, Dan Chaucer and his goodly company? Today the hills and valleys are the same. Gone are the forests ...
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Using conjunction “while” as an archaic prepositonal form for “until”

In my Penguin English Dictionary, I've encountered the word while marked as an archaic form for the preposition until. Furthermore, according to my online research, Oxford Dictionary states that it is ...
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255 views

What was Princeton 6 in Jamaican English?

I got an Old Raggae album and started listening to "Bam Bam" by Sister Nancy (youtube) After listening several times, I could start making out the English words (lyrics): A me seh one thing Nancy ...
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411 views

Is cruel standard use as a noun in poetry? Are there terms for non-standard English specifically in regard to use in poetry?

I hope this question isn't off-topic. I heard a madrigal with the following verse which bothers me somewhat, grammatically. Cruel, wilt thou persever? Peace to leave ever? Peace shalt thou have and ...
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972 views

How do we interpret these lines from 'Ulysses'?

What do these lines from Ulysses mean exactly? What is a sinking star? How does the simile work in the first line? This summary calls the phrase ambiguous. To follow knowledge like a sinking star, ...
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1answer
73 views

Meaning of “barrer” (noun) in W. Henley's poem “'Liza”

I don't understand the meaning in which the count noun word "barrer" is used in William Henley's poem 'Liza (the italics are the author's): ’Liza’s old man’s perhaps a little shady, ’Liza’s old ...
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2answers
62 views

Deciphering of William Henley's “Bus-Driver”: put 'a bit on'?

This beautiful sonnet, "Bus-Driver" by William Henley, is studded with idioms, some of which are hard to understand. I've bolded one part (of the two) I don't understand: He’s called The General ...
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3answers
49 views

What is the correct translation

I am trying to translate Invictus by William Ernest Henley into my language. I was done translating it, but I had a discussion with a fried for the first line. Out of the night that covers me. ...
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85 views

How can a poem be defined? [closed]

Merriam webster says: A piece of writing that usually has figurative language and that is written in separate lines that often have a repeated rhythm and sometimes rhyme. Googling 'define: poem' ...
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86 views

Correct way of reading The Nibelungenlied

I'm trying to read "The Nibelungenlied" in metrical English translation by George Henry Needler (http://www.gutenberg.org/dirs/etext05/niebn10h.htm). However, I've got certain difficulties with doing ...
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What is the meaning of the (seemingly) noun word “claw-catch” in a poem?

From "God's Secretary" by R.S. Gwynn: Her e-mail inbox always overflows. Her outbox doesn’t get much use at all. She puts on hold the umpteen-billionth call As music oozes forth to placate ...
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68 views

What is another word for an weak or unsatisfying (to the viewer) smile?

I'm writing a poem about someone who smiles in a very vague way that leaves something to be desired. I've thought about words like unreadable, empty and vague, but not really "enigmatic". Their smile ...
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Verb moods in the poem “Once more into the fray”

There is a poem in the Movie "The Grey" (2011). It goes like this: Once more into the fray... Into the last good fight I'll ever know. Live and die on this day... Live and die on this day... ...
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133 views

Looking for a word similar to metaphor or symbol or allegory

A person is traveling dangerously fast on a rainy night with low visibility - traveling with reckless abandon in an already dangerous situation. What is the word that describes the literary sense in ...
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534 views

What's the word for something that's too direct and plain rather than poetic?

When someone writes poetry that's almost like plain English sentences, what may we call that? Consider this, for example. This is an example of that plain, stated as it is, poetry (completely made ...
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212 views

Single-word “mirror” synonyms

I was looking for the synonyms of the noun mirror: A surface capable of reflecting sufficient undiffused light to form an image of an object placed in front of it. The majority of the synonyms ...
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67 views

The meaning of “Alexis” in Pope's Second Pastoral

"Alexis" comes from Greek, meaning "to help, defend." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexis_(given_name) Alexander Pope seems to use it in a different sense. His Second Pastoral is entitled Summer ...
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373 views

How do I use, “Be it” in a question, or can I? [closed]

I'm writing a poem and I want to use this specific wording, but I'm not sure if it's grammatically correct. Here is the line: "Will you ever ask for the truth or be it ignorant you stay?"
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“Made a rhyme without effort” in English from Spanish “Hice verso sin esfuerzo”

In Spanish we can say "Hice verso sin esfuerzo", which means something along the lines of "I made a rhyme without effort", whilst rhyming. What would be an English equivalent of this phrase? I've ...
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“Great Divide” synonyms

I am looking for strong, yet poetic expressions/synonyms of "Great Divide" which, beside its other meanings, expresses "a major point of division, especially death." The context I need is the act of ...
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A “Frankenstein's monster” similar metaphors

Although originally it's a novel character, a "Frankenstein's monster" became a metaphor for "something that cannot be controlled and that attacks or destroys the person who invented it." However, are ...
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143 views

“Tear(drop)” synonyms

I've been looking for the synonyms (especially poetic ones) referring to the nouns "tear" and "tear-drop". Unfortunately, there wasn't much for me to find. I've found two, poetic ones - "brine" and ...
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57 views

“Niveous” poetic synonyms

Are there any more poetic synonyms for "snow-white" and "niveous"? I was searching but I've only found "nival".
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1k views

How to understand these verses from the poem “The road not taken” by Robert Frost

I actually have two questions regarding this poem: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, ...
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149 views

What is the name of a particular poetic foot, unstressed, stressed, stressed?

There are six well-known feet in English poetry--dactyl, spondee, anapest, iamb, trochee, and pyrrhic. However, is there also a name for the foot with unstressed, stressed, stressed, and/or is it ...
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106 views

A jilt whose ear was never whispered close (From “On Fame” by John Keats)

I've met an ambiguous line in Keat's "On Fame": FAME, like a wayward girl, will still be coy       To those who woo her with too slavish knees, But makes ...
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How does one tell the difference between long and short syllables?

Currently in the process of playing with Limericks and the meter they use usually requires a meter of long followed by two short syllables or vice versa. My question, how do you differentiate? Is it ...
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288 views

Term for poems structured by repetitive devices

Terms such as "blank verse", "free verse" and "heroic couplet" are used to refer to poems with particular forms. I am curious to know whether there exists a term for poems that are strongly ...
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A poem written long ago that reminds me of Elliot Rodger [closed]

I'm sure most of you have heard now about Elliot Rodger and his angst against young women. A memory of a poem came to me today that I had read way back in highschool, but I forgot who wrote it and was ...
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2answers
535 views

Meaning of “top” in “to sleep as sound as a top”

From "The Early Bird", by George MacDonald. A little bird sat on the edge of her nest; Her yellow-beaks slept as sound as tops; Day-long she had worked almost without rest, And had ...
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How do I submit a villanelle in MLA style? [closed]

I understand how to submit essays in MLA styles, but how do I submit a villanelle?
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203 views

What literary device is this? [duplicate]

I have been stumped in characterizing Medbh McGuckian's style of poetry: she often vividly describes the actions of things in her works to imply what they are. For example, within the context of war, ...
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Term to a verse that starts with the last word of the previous verse

The music "Glad you came" by The Wanted has the following verses Turn the lights out now, now I'll take you by the hand Hand you another drink, drink it if you can Can you spend a ...
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286 views

Use of “you and I” in TS Eliot's Prufrock

I've long been a fan of T.S. Eliot's poem The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. However, it seems to me that his use of "you and I" in the opening lines is incorrect. Let us go then, you and I, when ...
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Charge of the Light Bridage

"Forward, the Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Someone had blunder'd: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die: ...
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Understand Rudyard Kipling's poem If

I came across Rudyard Kipling's poem If, quoted below: If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, ...