Poetry Is a form of literary art in which language is used for its aesthetic and evocative qualities in addition to, or in lieu of, its apparent meaning.

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“Tear(drop)” synonyms

I've been looking for the synonyms (especially poetic ones) referring to the nouns "tear" and "tear-drop". Unfortunately, there wasn't much for me to find. I've found two, poetic ones - "brine" and ...
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Using conjunction “while” as an archaic prepositonal form for “until”

In my Penguin English Dictionary, I've encountered the word while marked as an archaic form for the preposition until. Furthermore, according to my online research, Oxford Dictionary states that it is ...
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36 views

What does the poem “My Cup” by Robert Friend mean? [closed]

"My Cup" by Robert Friend They tell me I am going to die. Why don't I seem to care? My cup is full. Let it spill.
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“Niveous” poetic synonyms

Are there any more poetic synonyms for "snow-white" and "niveous"? I was searching but I've only found "nival".
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How to understand these verses from the poem “The road not taken” by Robert Frost

I actually have two questions regarding this poem: The Road Not Taken by Robert Frost Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, And sorry I could not travel both And be one traveler, ...
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27 views

What is the name of a particular poetic foot, unstressed, stressed, stressed?

There are six well-known feet in English poetry--dactyl, spondee, anapest, iamb, trochee, and pyrrhic. However, is there also a name for the foot with unstressed, stressed, stressed, and/or is it ...
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66 views

A jilt whose ear was never whispered close (From “On Fame” by John Keats)

I've met an ambiguous line in Keat's "On Fame": FAME, like a wayward girl, will still be coy       To those who woo her with too slavish knees, But makes ...
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67 views

Term for poems structured by repetitive devices

Terms such as "blank verse", "free verse" and "heroic couplet" are used to refer to poems with particular forms. I am curious to know whether there exists a term for poems that are strongly ...
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A poem written long ago that reminds me of Elliot Rodger [closed]

I'm sure most of you have heard now about Elliot Rodger and his angst against young women. A memory of a poem came to me today that I had read way back in highschool, but I forgot who wrote it and was ...
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32 views

How do I submit a villanelle in MLA style? [closed]

I understand how to submit essays in MLA styles, but how do I submit a villanelle?
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109 views

What literary device is this? [duplicate]

I have been stumped in characterizing Medbh McGuckian's style of poetry: she often vividly describes the actions of things in her works to imply what they are. For example, within the context of war, ...
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Term to a verse that starts with the last word of the previous verse

The music "Glad you came" by The Wanted has the following verses Turn the lights out now, now I'll take you by the hand Hand you another drink, drink it if you can Can you spend a ...
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Use of “you and I” in TS Eliot's Prufrock

I've long been a fan of T.S. Eliot's poem The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock. However, it seems to me that his use of "you and I" in the opening lines is incorrect. Let us go then, you and I, when ...
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Verb moods in the poem “Once more into the fray”

There is a poem in the Movie "The Grey" (2011). It goes like this: Once more into the fray... Into the last good fight I'll ever know. Live and die on this day... Live and die on this day... ...
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Charge of the Light Bridage

"Forward, the Light Brigade!" Was there a man dismay'd? Not tho' the soldier knew Someone had blunder'd: Theirs not to make reply, Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die: ...
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Do readers think of the word “ejaculate” beyond its common sexual meaning? [closed]

I am an editor, and a poet whom I work with has included the expression "I ejaculated little prayers" in one of his stanzas, which we all know has the dictionary meaning of "intensely calling out." ...
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What is Poetry? What does not count as Poetry? Help me get a grasp of it [closed]

Background: Yesterday afternoon I overheard two people chatting, I think one was reading or reciting a poem. It was quite emotional, and actually quite lovely. Later I saw several poems on TEDTalks ...
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Shakespeare and Maths: Metre and Completeness

Shakespearian sonnets have a particular structure where each line of the poem contains ten syllables (due to the use of iambic pentameter). This is, one might think, because ten sounds 'complete' to ...
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The meaning of “rack” or “rock” in “The Peasant Poet” by John Clare

From “The Peasant Poet”, a poem by John Clare: He loved the brook's soft sound, The swallow swimming by. He loved the daisy-covered ground, The cloud-bedappled sky. To him the dismal storm ...
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“I will meet” anapest substitute

I have the following song verse, which needs to be composed in Anapest (unaccented unaccented accented): I will meet (i-WILL-meet) Annabelle (an-nuh-BELLE) In my dreams (in-my-DREAMS) What would ...
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257 views

Can I use “let … alone” to mean “even though/if”? [closed]

I am composing a poem and have something like this Even if/though it is thousand miles far, we can still share the one. in mind, which I want to express it more poetically as Let thousand ...
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169 views

Are there words in English that are both alliterations and rhyme?

I'm wondering if it is possible for words to be both alliterations and rhyme with each other? It seems like it is possible, especially if you allow for a different number of syllables, but I can't ...
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418 views

Parsing the first two lines of “Western Wind”

The 16th century poem "Western Wind" goes as follows: Westron wynde, when wilt thou blow, The small raine down can raine. Cryst, if my love were in my armes And I in my bedde ...
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Would “aftermath” ever be used to mean “a reaction of crackdown”?

In the context of revolution, there often comes the word "aftermath," usually meaning the bad consequences of a given revolution on the long run. Can I, however, use it to mean the immediate ...
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99 views

This word doesn't make any sense in this context

Cowley's Poems: But I within me bear alas too great allays. What does this 'allay' mean? This poet says, I wish I could be overheat with praise!, so this man is unhappy. However, allay ...
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Does this translation make sense? [closed]

I'm trying to translate a piece of my poem which is in Persian into English. I've so far come up with this: And what you see is a bewildering reflection of shadows, leaving the light lost on its ...
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Meaning of “It flaming spread” in a Tolkien poem

Tolkien wrote a poem called “Over the misty mountains cold”, which is featured as a song in the first Hobbit movie. In this poem there are those verses that made me scratch my head: The pines were ...
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Meaning of “top” in “to sleep as sound as a top”

From "The Early Bird", by George MacDonald. A little bird sat on the edge of her nest; Her yellow-beaks slept as sound as tops; Day-long she had worked almost without rest, And had ...
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“Angels fall, they are towers”: what is “towers” here? Froma poem by G.M.Hopkins

From a poem of G. M. Hopkins titled "The Shepherd’s brow, fronting forked lightning, owns": THE SHEPHERD’S brow, fronting forked lightning, owns The horror and the havoc and the glory Of ...
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110 views

“over his turned temples”, from a poem by G.M.Hopkins

From Gerard Manley Hopkins' poem, "The Furl of fresh-leaved dogrose down" Then over his turnèd temples—here— Was a rose, or, failing that, Rough-Robin or five-lipped campion clear ...
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“the stir and keep of pride” in G.M.Hopkins' poem

From The Habit of Perfection by Gerard Manley Hopkins: Nostrils, your careless breath that spend Upon the stir and keep of pride, What relish shall the censers send Along the ...
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“a truce to sport..” from a poem by Paul Laurence Dunbar

From "A Lazy Day" by Paul Laurence Dunbar: No ripple stirs the placid pool, When my adventurous line is cast, A truce to sport, while clear and cool, The mirrored clouds slide ...
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“be in at the end I cannot”, from G.M.Hopkins' poem

There's a great poem by G.M. Hopkins, in which I but vaguely get the meaning of the two last stanzas, stumbling at properly parsing the sentences in my mind. In particular, I don't understand the ...
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Being mighty a master, being a father and fond: what “fond” is?

I'm not sure of the meaning of the last word in the last line of G.M. Hopkin's "In the valley of the Elwy": God, lover of souls, swaying considerate scales, Complete thy creature dear O where it ...
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“brought some horses, real heelers..” : what is “heeler” here?

I quote from An Evening in Dandaloo (1891) by Banjo Paterson: It was while we held our races -- Hurdles, sprints and steplechases -- Up in Dandaloo, That a crowd of Sydney stealers, Jockeys, ...
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278 views

What is a long syllable? [closed]

I have to write a 24-line poem in Dactylic Hexameter. I looked up what dactyl meant, and I got this answer on wiki: ...a dactyl is a long syllable followed by two short syllables... What is the ...
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Understand Rudyard Kipling's poem If

I came across Rudyard Kipling's poem If, quoted below: If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you, If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, ...
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How do we interpret these lines from 'Ulysses'?

What do these lines from Ulysses mean exactly? What is a sinking star? How does the simile work in the first line? This summary calls the phrase ambiguous. To follow knowledge like a sinking star, ...
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What does this poem mean? “It's not the cough that'll carry you off It's the coffin they'll carry you off in” [closed]

What does this poem mean? It's not the cough that'll carry you off It's the coffin they'll carry you off in
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Meaning of ‘silvan game’ [closed]

Does anybody know the meaning of italicized phrase? Fye upon your name! In wrath, for loss of silvan game, Saint Hilda’s priest ye slew. It's passage from Walter Scott's Marmion, Canto ...
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Meaning of “I kissed her for her mother”

I recently re-read E.J. Brady's Down in Honolulu, but this line has stuck out to me: I kissed her for her mother,   I gev' her one, two, three; I squoze her for her brother— ...
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What meter is best for songs, especially hymns? [closed]

I realize that this may be somewhat open-ended, but although I am not a poet, I want to try my hand at writing a song, perhaps a hymn, and wonder if perhaps iambic pentameter is best, or perhaps ...
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249 views

What is the meaning of the line “Upon a homely object Love can wink” in this context

What's the meaning of the last line of this extract from Shakespeare's Two Gentlemen of Verona? Valentine. This is the gentleman I told your ladyship Had come along with me, but that his ...
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Why are identical rhymes inferior in English poetry?

From “War Pigs” by Black Sabbath: Generals gathered in their masses Just like witches at black masses In English poetry, a perfect rhyme has identical vowels but different onsets, like come ...
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Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around? [closed]

Is there a technical term for when verbs in a sentence appear as if they have been swapped around as in the example here? 'her fingers creased in gold [and] her body ringed in folds' In this ...
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Why present perfect in “When the night has come”?

In the song “Stand by Me”, we see a sentence like “when the night has come.” I was taught that in a when clause, we use the past tense, yet the present perfect has been used in the sentence cited ...
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What do you call a poem or song that sets up a rhyme and then ignores it?

Here is a line from the song "Popular" in the musical Wicked. I am trying to explain what we call the anticlimax of the last three lines, where a rhyme is expected but not delivered. When I see ...
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What's the word for something that's too direct and plain rather than poetic?

When someone writes poetry that's almost like plain English sentences, what may we call that? Consider this, for example. This is an example of that plain, stated as it is, poetry (completely made ...
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Iambic Tetrameter?

God and my right shall me defend. I have said this motto a fair few times in my head a number of times and it seems as though iambic tetrameter is the meter that fits best The way I see it is, ...
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Meter in Clare's “I am”

I've determined that almost all of John Clare's "I am" is in iambic pentameter. But I'm having trouble identifying the meter of the following line: But the vast shipwreck of my life's esteems My ...