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3
votes
2answers
542 views

“often” vs. “oftentimes”

“often” vs. “oftentimes” Is “oftentimes” a pleonasm? My current understanding is that “often” denotes frequent occurrence. If “often” communicates frequent occurrence, then what need is there to ...
2
votes
6answers
6k views

Is “best regards” a pleonasm?

If the meaning of regards is best wishes, would not best regards (used to express friendliness in greetings, especially at the end of letters) a pleonasm, in the context of letters? Best regards, ...
2
votes
3answers
163 views

Is “unexpected repercussion” repetitive?

Is the phrase unexpected repercussion unnecessary redundantly repetitive? When I looked up repercussion I see that unexpected is implicit in its meaning. Should I prefer to say unexpected ...
2
votes
2answers
183 views

Is “spatial contiguity” a pleonasm?

I used the terms "spatial contiguity" to emphasise the relation between two objects as opposed to synchronism, i.e. chronological contiguity. I then questioned myself whether or not that would ...
2
votes
2answers
395 views

Do they call this *it* expletive?

Given the example: Was it then that I thought of Alan? No, earlier. From the very first wave of panic my mind reached out to him. Yes, even then, in the heart of the fear, there was a still small ...
1
vote
2answers
34 views

Is “final intention” a pleonasm?

I'm proofreading a report and stumbled on this in the following form: His final intention is to create a large flying city. Is “final intention” a pleonasm in this sentence (or always)?
1
vote
1answer
43 views

Is “eclectic combination” a pleonasm?

Doesn't the term eclectic also describe a mix/combination? Is it correct to use this expression?
0
votes
2answers
237 views

Is “repetitive pattern” a pleonasm that I should avoid?

The context: a warning to a user of a website that tells the user that patterns in an image should be avoided. One of the key characteristics of a pattern is that it is repetitive. There is no such ...
0
votes
3answers
379 views

“Any way, shape, or form”

"[In] any way, shape, or form" is a rhetorical idiom, in which shape and form tend to function as intensifiers. It is normally used for emphasis where the non-idiomatic phrases "[in] any way" or (less ...