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0
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1answer
23 views

How would I go about including a he-said/she-said statement?

I'm writing a book where in the beginning, we'r introduced to the couple by a conversation they're having. I'm wondering how I can phrase it correctly? "It's like I don't even know you anymore, ...
1
vote
5answers
59 views

Do you have a better way to cater to the need to express something as being “uncatered” to?

I needed "cater" as an adjective today, and I didn't enjoy how it worked out; and not only due to the spell checked thumbing its nose at me. http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/uncatered appears ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How to avoid ordinal numbers when referring to a place in a queue?

I have the following sentence: "You are currently 5th in the queue" I'd like to avoid using ordinal numbers. What is the best way to rephrase this sentence such that it conveys the same meaning, ...
1
vote
1answer
56 views

To be about; to be all about

I have a nagging feeling "to be all about" is vastly different than its "all"-less counterpart. This game is all about teamwork. To me this means the very basis, the fundamental element of this ...
-1
votes
2answers
51 views

Phrasing of sentence help please [closed]

This is a property that restricts her ability to respond to emotions other than sadness. Does this mean that she can only respond to sadness? Thank you.
0
votes
0answers
11 views

“…one of the [X]est [Y]s of the [first/second] half of the [Nth] century…”

e.g. "...one of the greatest figures of the second half of the 19th century..." Following this query, can anyone advise alternatives to the above that are more succinct, please..?
1
vote
4answers
159 views

Looking for a word that means “a lack of listening skills”

This is my first time here, and I am hoping this community can help me out. The context is as follows: I witnessed a slow transition from awareness and excitement to Wallace's "natural state" - ...
1
vote
3answers
86 views

Is it correct to say “conscientious of the fact”

I'm writing out an e-mail blast and part of the sentence is I’d like to send this e-mail out as a reminder to everyone to be conscientious of the fact that if there are changes to be made to... ...
-1
votes
1answer
608 views

Past day vs. Passed day [closed]

I am writing an account of something, and I'm not sure whether I should say "passed day", as in "Day that has passed" or "past day", as in "Day in the past". In the evenings we would get together ...
0
votes
2answers
84 views

Phrase concept of self-knowledge?

I don't know how to express this. I want to say that the ugliness of adolescence is hidden BUT not for adolescents themselves. Is this sentence correct? is there a better phrasing? "the ugliness of ...
1
vote
2answers
110 views

How does 1:30 sound? [closed]

Someone overheard me say "How does 1:30 sound?" and suggested that the preferred way to phrase this question (i.e., when scheduling a meeting) would be to ask "How does 1:30 work?" or "Does 1:30 sound ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

“That will have to” vs “Which will have to” [duplicate]

I am not really sure if this sentence is translated correctly into English : Access keys have been researched and the implementation will be done in a future sprint, that will have something to do ...
2
votes
2answers
89 views

Negating two verbs separated by or

I'm curious about the logical implications of phrasings of the form: not given or received In my mind, this can parse as either "not (given or received)" or "(not given) or (received)", which ...
1
vote
4answers
211 views

A more formal phrasing of “in the future”

Is there a more formal or better way of phrasing "in the future"? Example: Please refrain from using said substance in the future.
0
votes
1answer
99 views

Adjective and Noun Placement

Is it better to say "We rescued the five people trapped" or "We rescued the five trapped people"? And why?
0
votes
1answer
68 views

Placement of “ever” with “have”

I'm having a hard time telling if my wording is correct or not. In the following sentence, "...a job like that would be the first of its kind I will ever have worked," does it make any difference ...
2
votes
7answers
163 views

What would be a valid replacement of “as”?

Say I want to write something to say: John looked over his shoulder as he opened the door slowly. However, for stylistic reasons I don't really want to use as in that sentence. There must be ...
21
votes
10answers
5k views

Is “I believe x does not equal y” the same as “I don't believe x equals y”

Given x and y could be any phrase, do these phrases always mean the same thing? If not, what's the difference? I believe x does not equal y I don't believe x equals y
2
votes
3answers
73 views

Way of saying 'washes hands of it' but implies physical

Looking for a non-crappy way of describing someone doing that washing hand motion you do to clear your hands of dust or dirt, but without saying 'washing hand motion'. I feel like there's a good way ...
1
vote
3answers
489 views

Can you “do a goal” or do you have to “meet a goal?” [closed]

If I am asking a client what they will be doing to meet a fitness goal, i.e. riding a bike to be more active (the goal is to be more active). Can I say, "how will you do your goal?" in a goal setting ...
1
vote
2answers
38 views

Legitimacy of “construct from nothing”

I was thinking today about the phrasing of 'construct something from nothing' (the context was constructing ideas), and I began to wonder if 'construct' was really a good word to use. Maybe I'm just ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

“Regardless to the fact” vs “Regardless of the fact”

I want to say that something will happen regardless of whether something else happens. However, in my particular situation, using regardless of sounds awkward. Some arrangements work better than ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

Is “every… doesn't…” really the same thing as “not every…”?

I have noticed a to me confounding linguistic trend in the last few years of which I came across an example tonight: "Every receiver doesn’t become a star." (from here) This type of wording just ...
3
votes
3answers
99 views

Is this correct: “[x] is where [explanation]”

When explaining a concept, for example, recursion, is it valid to use a construction such as: Recursion is where a subroutine calls itself. To my ear, "is where" sounds somewhat weird. Do you ...
0
votes
2answers
83 views

Title starting by “questioning”

I'm writing an article which I entitled "Questioning theory X as the basis of theory Y". I no native speaker and I would like to know if such phrasing is correct in English.
1
vote
3answers
123 views

A shorter phrase for “is a poor predictor of”

This is a bullet point in a presentation: Coronary angiography is a poor predictor of the hemodynamic relevance of stenosis "is a poor predictor of" feels very round-about, but I can't think of ...
2
votes
2answers
192 views

Predicate or noun after “nationality”

Which one is correct? To put a predicate after nationality His nationality is Chinese. To put a noun after nationality His nationality is China.
4
votes
2answers
2k views

“Half” or “A Half”

This argument has come up at work, and I actually found it pretty interesting. My colleague is arguing that you might say "a quarter of a pizza", whereas you'd just say "half of a pizza" rather than ...
1
vote
1answer
176 views

President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]

I came across the following sentence in The Guardian (emphasis mine): President Vladimir Putin of Russia said the EU was putting pressure on Kiev and organising mass protests against President ...
1
vote
1answer
722 views

phrase replacement [closed]

I sometimes use common phrases that I'd rather spruce up with a single word or more direct phrase, or perhaps just by using fresher wording. One phrase I'd like to change is: "was the fact that." My ...
1
vote
1answer
403 views

proper phrasing for “avoid X in favor of Y”

I'm having a brain cramp: if cookies should be avoided, and carrots are preferable instead, is it correct to say: Avoid cookies in favor of carrots. or if not, what's the correct way to phrase?
0
votes
3answers
922 views

“allow me a day's absence” sounds wrong to me. How do I phrase it better? [closed]

How do I phrase this line better - "<..Blah Blah.. Explaining what my problems are..>. It'll be really helpful if you can allow me a day's absence. Would this be possible?"
1
vote
2answers
117 views

How to better phrase “I'm Alec who enquired about…” [closed]

I'm writing an email to an angel investor I met recently. The context is: Hi John, Pleasure to briefly meet you at the ... event last Thursday. I'm Alec who enquired about the best way of ...
12
votes
4answers
3k views

A word that describes the polite phrases we use to begin our letters

How can we refer to the polite phrase used at the beginning of a letter (email in my specific context)? For example, we may start our letter: Dear Bob, I hope that you're well and had a nice ...
3
votes
2answers
468 views

Wording an 'If-Then' Statement Tense

I need help phrasing the last part of this conditional sentence (assume I can't change the first conditional statement): If I died tomorrow, I would have wanted to go skydiving. or If I ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

Is there another way to say 'working on'?

Is there another way to say "We are working on to update our resort."? I do not want to use working on.
3
votes
2answers
594 views

Should I follow English conventions, or write what sounds better?

How a sentence sounds when read aloud or in your head can often "sound" different for each individual doing so; however, I was reading details regarding the usage of "data" and "datum" and was ...
1
vote
2answers
236 views

“Sorting on” vs. “Sorting by”

Recently asked a question of a colleague: Are you sorting this list by acronym? He responded: Yes, I’m sorting on acronym (ascending). Emphasis mine in each case. Is one correct and not ...
5
votes
2answers
709 views

OK to use two “there”s in a sentence?

A teacher once told me that it is improper to use two there words in a sentence, such as There is a woman there. or Is there a man there? and instead state A woman is there. or ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Is it rude to say “how did you end up here”? [closed]

Is it rude to say, "how did you end up here?" to a teacher? I said it to my English teacher, and then thought, "damn, I don't know if I'm supposed to phrase it that way or not." So, is it?
4
votes
3answers
229 views

What do you call a statement like “No fake lures”?

We have a car dealer around here with an ad that reads "No Fake Lures". Now, as I understand the concept of a lure, if it doesn't attract attention, it's not a lure. And if a lure does attract ...
9
votes
6answers
2k views

learn how to [verb] vs. learn to [verb]

"learn to [verb]" "learn how to [verb]" Is [1] merely a less formal version of [2]? If not, does [1] communicate something subtly different? Consider the following: In [2], the object of learning ...
0
votes
1answer
562 views

Is 'I would like to make laugh from you' correct? [closed]

With the meaning to make jokes about somebody. Or, 'They love to make laugh from me', is it correct? or should it be 'at' instead of 'from'?
1
vote
1answer
411 views

Can “to revolve around” mean “to deal with/pertain to”?

... around which the book revolves. Can I use this expression to say that the book is dealing with a subject, addressing an issue, or talking about something? I'm open to suggestions if there is a ...
5
votes
3answers
4k views

“Each X” vs. “each of the Xs”

Are each X and each of the Xs interchangeable? For example, in the following sentence, I would use each of the characters: Each of the main characters is interesting. But one could also write ...
4
votes
6answers
433 views

Can a negative be used to express a positive, such as “mangoes are sweet and so aren't papayas.”

Is it incorrect to use the positive/negative construction when the intent is positive/positive? In other words can these two statements be viewed as equivalent: Mangoes are sweet and so aren't ...
3
votes
3answers
5k views

Wishing someone that something goes easily for them

I'm trying to phrase a sentence in which I'm wishing that something goes easily for someone, but can't get the wording to sound right, and not awkward. For example, someone may be studying for a test ...
4
votes
4answers
956 views

Can you rephrase this sentence (about storing files)?

Starting from this date all such files will be stored in folder B. Is it possible to re-phrase this sentence without changing its meaning in such a way that it would start from "Starting from ...
4
votes
7answers
773 views

Is there any suffix expressing “demand a lot”?

For example, a job that demands a lot of effort is effort-***? Or a program costs lots of money is money-***? Or a task needs high patience is patience-***?
2
votes
3answers
133 views

What's the name of this kind of act?

What's the name of this kind of act? It is commonly seen between friends. (I mean the act between two people, not necessarily 4 people like this one.) Or can you describe it with a few words?