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0
votes
2answers
40 views

Title starting by “questioning”

I'm writing an article which I entitled "Questioning theory X as the basis of theory Y". I no native speaker and I would like to know if such phrasing is correct in English.
2
votes
3answers
111 views

A shorter phrase for “is a poor predictor of”

This is a bullet point in a presentation: Coronary angiography is a poor predictor of the hemodynamic relevance of stenosis "is a poor predictor of" feels very round-about, but I can't think of ...
2
votes
2answers
105 views

“Half” or “A Half”

This argument has come up at work, and I actually found it pretty interesting. My colleague is arguing that you might say "a quarter of a pizza", whereas you'd just say "half of a pizza" rather than ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

President of [Country][Name] vs President [Name] of [Country]

I came across the following sentence in The Guardian (emphasis mine): President Vladimir Putin of Russia said the EU was putting pressure on Kiev and organising mass protests against President ...
1
vote
1answer
186 views

phrase replacement [closed]

I sometimes use common phrases that I'd rather spruce up with a single word or more direct phrase, or perhaps just by using fresher wording. One phrase I'd like to change is: "was the fact that." My ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

proper phrasing for “avoid X in favor of Y”

I'm having a brain cramp: if cookies should be avoided, and carrots are preferable instead, is it correct to say: Avoid cookies in favor of carrots. or if not, what's the correct way to phrase?
0
votes
3answers
185 views

“allow me a day's absence” sounds wrong to me. How do I phrase it better? [closed]

How do I phrase this line better - "<..Blah Blah.. Explaining what my problems are..>. It'll be really helpful if you can allow me a day's absence. Would this be possible?"
1
vote
2answers
100 views

How to better phrase “I'm Alec who enquired about…” [closed]

I'm writing an email to an angel investor I met recently. The context is: Hi John, Pleasure to briefly meet you at the ... event last Thursday. I'm Alec who enquired about the best way of ...
12
votes
4answers
2k views

A word that describes the polite phrases we use to begin our letters

How can we refer to the polite phrase used at the beginning of a letter (email in my specific context)? For example, we may start our letter: Dear Bob, I hope that you're well and had a nice ...
3
votes
2answers
235 views

Wording an 'If-Then' Statement Tense

I need help phrasing the last part of this conditional sentence (assume I can't change the first conditional statement): If I died tomorrow, I would have wanted to go skydiving. or If I ...
0
votes
3answers
795 views

Is there another way to say 'working on'?

Is there another way to say "We are working on to update our resort."? I do not want to use working on.
3
votes
2answers
558 views

Should I follow English conventions, or write what sounds better?

How a sentence sounds when read aloud or in your head can often "sound" different for each individual doing so; however, I was reading details regarding the usage of "data" and "datum" and was ...
1
vote
2answers
191 views

“Sorting on” vs. “Sorting by”

Recently asked a question of a colleague: Are you sorting this list by acronym? He responded: Yes, I’m sorting on acronym (ascending). Emphasis mine in each case. Is one correct and not ...
5
votes
2answers
447 views

OK to use two “there”s in a sentence?

A teacher once told me that it is improper to use two there words in a sentence, such as There is a woman there. or Is there a man there? and instead state A woman is there. or ...
2
votes
1answer
579 views

Is it rude to say “how did you end up here”? [closed]

Is it rude to say, "how did you end up here?" to a teacher? I said it to my English teacher, and then thought, "damn, I don't know if I'm supposed to phrase it that way or not." So, is it?
4
votes
3answers
205 views

What do you call a statement like “No fake lures”?

We have a car dealer around here with an ad that reads "No Fake Lures". Now, as I understand the concept of a lure, if it doesn't attract attention, it's not a lure. And if a lure does attract ...
9
votes
6answers
981 views

learn how to [verb] vs. learn to [verb]

"learn to [verb]" "learn how to [verb]" Is [1] merely a less formal version of [2]? If not, does [1] communicate something subtly different? Consider the following: In [2], the object of learning ...
0
votes
1answer
359 views

Is 'I would like to make laugh from you' correct? [closed]

With the meaning to make jokes about somebody. Or, 'They love to make laugh from me', is it correct? or should it be 'at' instead of 'from'?
1
vote
1answer
214 views

Can “to revolve around” mean “to deal with/pertain to”?

... around which the book revolves. Can I use this expression to say that the book is dealing with a subject, addressing an issue, or talking about something? I'm open to suggestions if there is a ...
4
votes
3answers
2k views

“Each X” vs. “each of the Xs”

Are each X and each of the Xs interchangeable? For example, in the following sentence, I would use each of the characters: Each of the main characters is interesting. But one could also write ...
4
votes
6answers
336 views

Can a negative be used to express a positive, such as “mangoes are sweet and so aren't papayas.”

Is it incorrect to use the positive/negative construction when the intent is positive/positive? In other words can these two statements be viewed as equivalent: Mangoes are sweet and so aren't ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

Wishing someone that something goes easily for them

I'm trying to phrase a sentence in which I'm wishing that something goes easily for someone, but can't get the wording to sound right, and not awkward. For example, someone may be studying for a test ...
3
votes
4answers
764 views

Can you rephrase this sentence (about storing files)?

Starting from this date all such files will be stored in folder B. Is it possible to re-phrase this sentence without changing its meaning in such a way that it would start from "Starting from ...
5
votes
7answers
622 views

Is there any suffix expressing “demand a lot”?

For example, a job that demands a lot of effort is effort-***? Or a program costs lots of money is money-***? Or a task needs high patience is patience-***?
2
votes
2answers
123 views

What's the name of this kind of act?

What's the name of this kind of act? It is commonly seen between friends. (I mean the act between two people, not necessarily 4 people like this one.) Or can you describe it with a few words?
2
votes
3answers
5k views

Alternative structures for “not only … but also …”?

I'm trying to write this essay and I find myself writing too many "not only ... but also ..." structures. Can you guys help me come up with some alternatives? Basically, I want this kind of ...
1
vote
3answers
844 views

Different ways to say “hope to Learn”

I am writing a study proposal broken into three sections. The third section will cover "what I hope to learn," which is not the greatest phrasing for a section. Alternative suggestions would be ...
5
votes
2answers
4k views

“Should either be” or “should be either”?

Which is more correct: This rule specifies that an object should be either visible or invisible, but not partially visible. Or This rule specifies that an object should either be visible or ...
0
votes
2answers
110 views

is that + <subject> + <verb> OR is the + <noun>

I am writing a paper and I want to criticize some other related work. I want to say that the problem of their work is that they don't support advanced composition rules. So which one is a better ...
1
vote
2answers
413 views

Is it redundant to say, “…based on any arbitrary criteria?”

Should "arbitrary" suffice on its own, or does it make sense to include "any?"