A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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80 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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126 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
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66 views

Can “above mentioned” be a noun?

The above mentioned regulations do not apply to the conditions defined here. Is it possible to use the phrase above mentioned as a noun with the definite article "the" in English? The above ...
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265 views

Usage of “give it a read”

Is the usage of the phrase "give it a read" correct? For instance, "Hey, I have attached my essay. Do give it a read and let me know what you think".
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104 views

How to describe an amount of data in the introduction

I'm writing a thesis, mostly about computer science (cloud computing, mostly). In the introduction I'd like to give the reader a vague idea about how much data we are talking about (4.5 TB if I ...
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36 views

is it correct to use 'often a times'?

Does the phrase "often a times" exist? If so, what is the correct way to use it? Would the following sentence be correct? I have seen him loafing about in the streets often a times.
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15 views

Use of 'such as themselves'?

Would it be correct to use the following sentence? The group make for a handsome lot. And that poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves. I have been ...
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21 views

care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors

Which of the phrases best describes the general responsibility for people who are under-age? care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors
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51 views

What are the sentence/ idioms and phrases often used in day to day life? Is there any good articles available listing these items?

English speaking peoples are most often using simple phrase in their day to day life. It would be help to speaking easily if those sentence or phrases known and share any link to learn those words.
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99 views

Can we use “as per your asking” when replying to queries

I am very confused at this usage, very common among my friends. As far as I understand, the correct usage is as per your query or as per your request ... My friends though use as per your asking .... ...
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38 views

(the?) day after tomorrow

It seems to me that when used as a noun, 'day after tomorrow' is preferred with 'the.' 'The day after tomorrow is the deadline.' But when used adverbially it is not so-prefaced.' 'I'll see you the ...
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1answer
52 views

Phrase indicating recruiters should not offer services in response to a job opening

In Dutch, there's a specific phrase / idiom you can use when posting a job opening to indicate that it's not appreciated if recruitment agencies offer to find a candidate for you ("Acquisitie naar ...
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50 views

As far as possible

Can I say "As far as it´s possible, I am doing fine" ? I mean that despite all that happened, I am doing fine.
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59 views

Does this sentence sound awkward, in terms of verb tense or preposition use?

Just a couple of quick questions: Though not all my students grappled with the same issues that I had faced... Does this phrase sound off at all? I'm trying to imply that I still struggle with ...
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1answer
77 views

Is “scant little” redundant?

I have seen this written (and have used it myself as well) but never really bothered to notice the meaning before. However, upon further inspection, "scant" is defined as "barely sufficient or ...
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1answer
35 views

“followed” as a participial phrase

Here's another participial phrase comma question (sorry, just trying to get this right). "The doorbell rang twice followed by the sound of the lock disengaging in the front of the house." Assume ...
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121 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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1answer
99 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
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163 views

Use of “don't mention it” for “you're welcome”?

In which American regions is "don't mention it" used for "you're welcome"?
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116 views

Is there any difference between “told to” and “told to do so”

I will release a new version when I'm told to. I will release a new version when I'm told to do so. Is there any difference in the meaning of the two sentences and which one would I use in an ...
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184 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
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122 views

“driving across the state” or “driving across state”?

Is it "driving across state" like "driving across town", or "driving across THE state", like "driving across the country"?
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1answer
124 views

“During this hour” vs. “In this hour”

"This took place in this hour." "This took place during this hour." Is there any difference between the phrases "in this hour" and "during this hour"?
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33 views

Usage of 'is it possible for a person like me to participate ..' in business letters

Does phrase 'Is it possible for a person like me to participate in ..' suit for a business letter? How can I rephrase it (without 'like me')? Thank you!
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76 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
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1k views

What is the origin of “over index”?

I often encounter (and use) this phrase in a context meaning to weight more heavily during decision making than is sensible, or to focus more heavily during a discussion than is warranted. For ...
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118 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
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38 views

Could you please do X vs. Could you do X please

I'm an English teacher, and I heard a student say "could you please open the window" the other day. To my ears, "could you please open the window" as a construction sounds exasperated, even ...
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24 views

Positive connotation Trojan horse?

There's a new app from Amazon called Amazon Underground. It supposedly provides 10,000 free non-IAP games. But what's the catch? Seems like the only thing it does it get the Amazon storefront to the ...
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39 views

Sentence doesn't “feel” right, but is it really incorrect?

A friend of mine wrote this sentence: 'The material consists of crumbly blocks, but they are still sturdy enough to not fall apart during bumpy transport.' To me this grates a bit. Even though the ...
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26 views

Common phrases for “won't be classmates”

First, here's the context. There are these two kids who have been classmates ever since, but unfortunately they won't be classmates in the following year. What phrases can I use to describe this ...
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49 views

What does “being had” mean in “due regard being had to”?

What exactly is meant by due regard being had to? I can’t understand the use of being had in such sentences. I mean only that due regard to can be used instead of it.
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82 views

Words that act as both noun and verb

Can all the verbs act as noun and vice versa ?
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38 views

Difference between “In Conclusion…” and “By way of conclusion…”

I just found a post asking about the difference between "In conclusion" and "By way of conclusion." I was pretty sure that I had a sense of the difference, but I couldn't see how my understanding of ...
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39 views

Using “One day before”

I want to express the following thing; Do your homework at least one day before the submission deadline. Suppose the 2nd person knows about this submission deadline thing (or may be clear from ...
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92 views

Other words for “it seems to me”

Can I use the phrase "it seems to me that" in a sentence where I intend to state my opinion. Why? If not, can you suggest other words to replace it (but still has the same meaning.)
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18 views

“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the following: Dollar rebounds biggest falls Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should instead be: Dollar rebounds after its biggest falls
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64 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
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70 views

Description of Puzzle Type

I am looking for the name of a certain type of word puzzle. A string of letters is given without any spaces between those letters. By strategically inserting spaces into the string, different valid ...
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42 views

In terms of putting

I heard someone says "In terms of putting this forward,". That was unfamiliar phrase with me, putting "In terms of something" and "Putting this forward" together. When I look in a dictionary ...
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34 views

Phrase for a specific point

Is there a more point-specific way to say "As a preliminary point,". For example, if I want to talk about the contents of a piece of agreement but I wish to point out on the outset that it is not ...
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111 views

A word or phrase for a non-military attack on a country's home soil

Consider this definition of asymmetric warfare: Asymmetric warfare is war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ ...
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354 views

“With this going on” and “got a lot going on”

Here's a fragment of "Rocky Balboa - Inspirational Speech": With this going on, it's gonna be worse than ever. - It don't have to be. - Sure it does. -Why? You got a lot goin' on, kid. And ...
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84 views

What's the meaning of “we couldn't shake it”

I've heard this phrase in a song, but I don't think its meaning lies in terms to get rid off something. I'll never forget you Although at times we couldn't shake it
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73 views

grammatical construct “sitting on the bench”

What is the grammatical construct or part of speech of the following two phrases in italics? Sitting on the bench, the tramp wondered about life. The tramp sitting on the bench wondered about ...
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22 views

Looking for the source of “SJO” or “South Jersey Original”?

Looking for source of "SJO" or "South Jersey Original" used to describe a person from Southern New Jersey whose behavior (usually idiosyncratic) is startling or otherwise worthy of note.
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29 views

The release stage in 'set down 'big pan'.

My question is: 'Set down' - /t/ is inaudibly released because of the 'plosive + plosive' combination. So /d/ in a word 'down' also should be inaudibly released, right? 'Big pan' - during my classes ...
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78 views

What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?

What are the word combinations called? (Blank AND Blank) they are often used... Law and Order Judge and Jury Cops and Robbers Bait and Switch Cease and Desist Stop and Go Checks and ...
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721 views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
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34 views

Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...