A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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134 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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35 views

Questions about vocabulary related to publishing and writing - proper words

Updating my resume and converting it to English, I encountered the following issues: I have written a few technical books. In the resume summary, what should I refer to myself as? Writer, author..? ...
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1answer
115 views

What is the accurate English translation/meaning of the phrase “In nocte consilium”, the motto of Birkbeck College in London?

Not sure if this is the appropriate place to pose this question, but apparently we don't have a Latin Stackexchange... The motto of Birkbeck College in London is "In nocte consilium". However I have ...
2
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1answer
147 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
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1answer
35 views

Can “fatal disaster” mean man-made misfortune?

Yesterday, I talked with a friend and mentioned that the Lord Jesus had the potential of suffering a fatal disaster in Judea, because many people tried to kill Him, like the high priest, King of ...
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33 views

Is “metonymically imply” redundant?

Is "metonymically imply" redundant in this sentence: The poet shows this distance from the divine by identifying the stomach and womb as definitive traits of the human condition; these organs ...
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63 views

“He could do X for England”. Are there similar expressions in other parts of the English-speaking world to this derogatory sentence?

In Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels, I've read the phrase: "He could [do x] for England. It is always derogatory. It is a lovely phrase! Because I can't put my finger on a quote from these ...
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107 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
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2k views

What is the origin of “over index”?

I often encounter (and use) this phrase in a context meaning to weight more heavily during decision making than is sensible, or to focus more heavily during a discussion than is warranted. For ...
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137 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
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7 views

Appropriate use of “to have a background in…”

Is it reasonable to say that I have a background in information technology when I have worked as a programmer for over ten years, but have no university degree or formal training?
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13 views

What is another way of saying <I have changed my views>

What is another way of saying "I have changed my views"
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25 views

using against the edifice the instruments or stones available in the house

What does the highlighted sentence mean? Is it some kind of saying? What is the meaning of "edifice" here? Source: Read the Cultural Other
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30 views

usage of “only ever”

I have heard and seen "only ever" used as in: "I only ever clean my car when the sun is high." I live in Massachusetts and never heard this usage until recently. I understand the meaning, but wonder ...
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29 views

“In the Last Decades” = “Over Recent Decades”?

Example: This trend has been affected by significant changes in the last decades / over recent decades. I've always believed that "in the last decades" should be followed by "of" and a period of ...
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30 views

“There is nothing like that” vs “There is no such thing” vs “There is nothing similar”

What's the difference in meaning (if any) between these three sentences? Could you give some examples of common situations when you'd use one and no the others?
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44 views

appropriate phrase for expressing close distances toward a person

Imagine this scenario: You are having a conversation with someone about a tropical fruit which you have seen the picture of it(on the internet or something) and you do know the name of it, but you ...
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65 views

Obscure sentence

I'd like to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct: Deep perineal pouch is related above to perineal membrane. I'd like to know what is the correct meaning the sentence implies ...
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33 views

how to use ' in love with' correctly?

I know that it usually describes romantic and sexual attraction. But can you say 'I'm in love with him' about your friend whom you love platonically? Is it appropriate?
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29 views

Can I use “at all” instead of “either” in a sentence?

If you want a really simple and easy way to get rid of the “Get Windows 10” icon and stop your PC from downloading Windows 10, you can download a little piece of freeware called GWX Control Panel from ...
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107 views

How to use “have an impact”?

I was wondering whether saying "have an impact" instead of "have an impact on" is idiomatically correct. "He aspired to have an impact through education and hard work."
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28 views

Armor glistening like glass in Chapman's Homer

I am trying to recover a lovely phrase that I only dimly remember. I think that it's in Chapman's Homer. I think that it's a simile: someone's armor or shield (perhaps Agamemnon's) "glistens like ...
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35 views

Punctuation of a very complicated list

I have the following complicated list: Authenticated key exchange protocols are ubiquitous across the internet. Notable examples include Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), also known as Transport Layer ...
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44 views

what is the meaning of “I saw the mortal face of a man”

For the first time since I became a man I saw the mortal face of a man, and his face seemed terrible to me and I turned from it. -What Men Live By: And Other Tales -Leo Graf Tolstoy- I'm ...
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45 views

Phrase request to indicate research preference

I need some help in framing a sentence (or two). I am applying for a grad school and I am interested in working in one research area. However, I do not want to bring down my chances of admission into ...
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55 views

What is Character B doing to Character A?

Character C was unfortunate to get infected with West Nile virus and now has wide rashes all over her body and has turned into an ugly looking woman(she was really hot before) and now faces the ...
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29 views

Conjunctions or Interrupting phrase

Are both correct and are their meanings the same? This is the reason, therefore, that you should buy the house. This is the reason; therefore, you should buy the house. One is interrupting phrase, ...
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78 views

What does this sentence mean? (complex-sentences)

English is not my native language, so I'm having a hard time understanding the meaning of this sentence, someone could explain its meaning in other words? "You may not put it in your eye, but it ...
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54 views

Time-Taken; Taken Time; Used Time

I have created a tool/database for the measurement of the time which is used to complete a specific process/workflow in my company. One of the columns shows the time the workflow used to be ...
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56 views

How would this sentence be correct in English

I would like to know how a sentence, "We are looking for a suitable taxi for you" be correct, a native speaker told me it is not. I guess "for you" and "suitable" could be left out, any other ...
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50 views

Positive connotation Trojan horse?

There's a new app from Amazon called Amazon Underground. It supposedly provides 10,000 free non-IAP games. But what's the catch? Seems like the only thing it does it get the Amazon storefront to the ...
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62 views

Sentence doesn't “feel” right, but is it really incorrect?

A friend of mine wrote this sentence: 'The material consists of crumbly blocks, but they are still sturdy enough to not fall apart during bumpy transport.' To me this grates a bit. Even though the ...
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39 views

Common phrases for “won't be classmates”

First, here's the context. There are these two kids who have been classmates ever since, but unfortunately they won't be classmates in the following year. What phrases can I use to describe this ...
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262 views

Words that act as both noun and verb

Can all the verbs act as noun and vice versa ?
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73 views

Difference between “In Conclusion…” and “By way of conclusion…”

I just found a post asking about the difference between "In conclusion" and "By way of conclusion." I was pretty sure that I had a sense of the difference, but I couldn't see how my understanding of ...
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78 views

Using “One day before”

I want to express the following thing; Do your homework at least one day before the submission deadline. Suppose the 2nd person knows about this submission deadline thing (or may be clear from ...
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2k views

Other words for “it seems to me”

Can I use the phrase "it seems to me that" in a sentence where I intend to state my opinion. Why? If not, can you suggest other words to replace it (but still has the same meaning.)
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18 views

“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the following: Dollar rebounds biggest falls Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should instead be: Dollar rebounds after its biggest falls
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93 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
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86 views

Description of Puzzle Type

I am looking for the name of a certain type of word puzzle. A string of letters is given without any spaces between those letters. By strategically inserting spaces into the string, different valid ...
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57 views

In terms of putting

I heard someone says "In terms of putting this forward,". That was unfamiliar phrase with me, putting "In terms of something" and "Putting this forward" together. When I look in a dictionary ...
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38 views

Phrase for a specific point

Is there a more point-specific way to say "As a preliminary point,". For example, if I want to talk about the contents of a piece of agreement but I wish to point out on the outset that it is not ...
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196 views

A word or phrase for a non-military attack on a country's home soil

Consider this definition of asymmetric warfare: Asymmetric warfare is war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ ...
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752 views

“With this going on” and “got a lot going on”

Here's a fragment of "Rocky Balboa - Inspirational Speech": With this going on, it's gonna be worse than ever. - It don't have to be. - Sure it does. -Why? You got a lot goin' on, kid. And ...
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139 views

What's the meaning of “we couldn't shake it”

I've heard this phrase in a song, but I don't think its meaning lies in terms to get rid off something. I'll never forget you Although at times we couldn't shake it
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101 views

grammatical construct “sitting on the bench”

What is the grammatical construct or part of speech of the following two phrases in italics? Sitting on the bench, the tramp wondered about life. The tramp sitting on the bench wondered about ...
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22 views

Looking for the source of “SJO” or “South Jersey Original”?

Looking for source of "SJO" or "South Jersey Original" used to describe a person from Southern New Jersey whose behavior (usually idiosyncratic) is startling or otherwise worthy of note.
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2k views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
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38 views

Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...
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Did the idiomatic phrase “lay your ship bare” exist prior to 2010?

Is there any evidence that the idiomatic phrase "lay your ship bare" existed prior to 2010? Or did that phrase come about when people misheard the lyrics to Adele's "Rolling in the Deep" song?