A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Synonym for “worse” with no negative connotation

Say there are two records in a band's discography and neither of them is bad. What's a better term than "worse" to refer to one record not being as great as the other record? Since both records are ...
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144 views

What is the difference between “extended from” and “extending from”?

Scenario 1: part A is extended from part B Scenario 2: part A is extending from part B Is there any difference between these two descriptions? Would any one so kind to help me about this? Thanks in ...
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52 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
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71 views

What term would best describe a need for friendship?

A friend of mine asked an interesting question today: If sexual frustration is need for sex and romantic frustration is need for romance, what is need for friendship? Note: To be clear, this is ...
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83 views

“That strikes one for me”…what's it mean?

What's the "one" mean here? Is this taken from baseball? Can the idiom be grammatically used in other persons besides the first?
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68 views

Usage of the phrase “over his lifetime”

Is it appropriate to use the phrase "over his lifetime" for in introducing someone if the person is still alive, i.e. "...his dedication to music over his lifetime..."
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803 views

Is “not worth to do” an acceptable alternative to “not worth doing”?

Basically what the title says, nothing more to add. I've encountered the former form on the Internet more than once, hence the question. Thanks!
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2answers
63 views

Is “this object remains a valid inclusion in a discussion of similar objects” grammatically correct?

The wider context within which I am writing this phrase is: What is certain, however, is that early twentieth-century piano rolls, while not themselves audio recordings, remain a valid inclusion ...
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1answer
103 views

Translation of Merkel Speech in Auschwitz

German chancellor Angela Merkel said at the Auschwitz commemoration: "Es ist eine Schande, dass Menschen in Deutschland angepöbelt, bedroht oder angegriffen werden, wenn sie sich irgendwie als Juden ...
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1answer
51 views

How to describe an amount of data in the introduction

I'm writing a thesis, mostly about computer science (cloud computing, mostly). In the introduction I'd like to give the reader a vague idea about how much data we are talking about (4.5 TB if I ...
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1answer
219 views

Alternative for Under the Guidance of

I am writing a statement of purpose and want an alternative for "under the guidance of Professor". I has been used many times in the SOP and I want to avoid using it as much as possible. One ...
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1answer
35 views

Is “scant little” redundant?

I have seen this written (and have used it myself as well) but never really bothered to notice the meaning before. However, upon further inspection, "scant" is defined as "barely sufficient or ...
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1answer
53 views

From/Since time immemorial

Which is correct? 'From' or 'Since' when applied to 'time immemorial'? I have seen both around, and have a feeling it might be 'from', but would like to check.
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1answer
30 views

“followed” as a participial phrase

Here's another participial phrase comma question (sorry, just trying to get this right). "The doorbell rang twice followed by the sound of the lock disengaging in the front of the house." Assume ...
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1answer
303 views

Compounds and Phrases - differences

What are differences of compounds and phrases and what do they have in common? I know there is the "nuclear stress rule" (phrasal stress on the last word of phrase) and the "compound stress rule" ...
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1answer
95 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
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1answer
65 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
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91 views

Use of “don't mention it” for “you're welcome”?

In which American regions is "don't mention it" used for "you're welcome"?
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89 views

Is there any difference between “told to” and “told to do so”

I will release a new version when I'm told to. I will release a new version when I'm told to do so. Is there any difference in the meaning of the two sentences and which one would I use in an ...
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1answer
1k views

the phrase “from now on” to be used in similar phrases

All of us know that "from now on" means starting from now, for example: From now on, all of us have to turn our mobiles off. But is this term assignable to such phrase? From lesson three on... (I ...
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1answer
126 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
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81 views

“driving across the state” or “driving across state”?

Is it "driving across state" like "driving across town", or "driving across THE state", like "driving across the country"?
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1answer
141 views

Could you pass me the salt? or Could you pass the salt?

Which of the following more common? 1) Could you pass me the salt? 2) Could you pass the salt? (without "me") What's the difference,if any?
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1answer
120 views

Is this proper use

I was watching the movie Man of Steel and in it is this passage: "There's only one way this ends Cal; either you die, or I do." Now this sounds wrong to me. There's two outcomes. "There's only on ...
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178 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
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1answer
398 views

meaning of “mugging away ?”

What is the meaning of "mugging away ?" Can anyone help me with this ? I know mugging merely means attack on someone in public places to steal something . But what is the meaning when it become ...
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1answer
717 views

What does “can be said to do / to be” something mean?

The various modern revolutions in physics, in psychology, in politics, even in literary style, have not escaped his intelligent notice, but they can scarcely be said to have influenced him deeply. ...
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42 views

Can I say “when it comes to the stage of…”?

As a result, the two of us who started off being very poor in programming wound up writing and designing the main structure of a website called “team work”. I continued to be in charge of technology ...
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102 views

I am trying to find something to express 'In the spotlight'

I am building a cold case discussion forum and want a phrase like IN THE SPOTLIGHT for cases that will be highlighted....or I would like to 'heat up'....help?
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207 views

Does using the phrase “operational state” imply that the referenced “thing” is inanimate?

Can it also be used while referring to animate "things"?
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36 views

Are the two statements equivalent?

"I will refuse nothing to a soul that makes a request of me in virtue of my passion. In this hour you can obtain everything for yourself and for others for asking" - statement (i) I tried to ...
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46 views

From Avocadoes to Asparagus, from kangaroos to koalas

What is the name of this literary saying? People use this figure of speech in order to express a wide coverage or variety of a certain class, such as vegetable species available in a market for ...
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102 views

What are the grammatical phrases in this sentence?

I'm analyzing this sentence and scanning it for prepositional, appositive and verbal phrases. In the sentence so far as I can tell there is only one prepositional and no appositive and no verbals ...
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28 views

meaning of this sentence?

consider the sentence below: "During this hour, I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of me. In this hour, you can obtain everything for yourself and for the others for the asking". ...
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36 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
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48 views

Description of Puzzle Type

I am looking for the name of a certain type of word puzzle. A string of letters is given without any spaces between those letters. By strategically inserting spaces into the string, different valid ...
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35 views

In terms of putting

I heard someone says "In terms of putting this forward,". That was unfamiliar phrase with me, putting "In terms of something" and "Putting this forward" together. When I look in a dictionary ...
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49 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
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31 views

Phrase for a specific point

Is there a more point-specific way to say "As a preliminary point,". For example, if I want to talk about the contents of a piece of agreement but I wish to point out on the outset that it is not ...
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84 views

A word or phrase for a non-military attack on a country's home soil

Consider this definition of asymmetric warfare: Asymmetric warfare is war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ ...
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125 views

“With this going on” and “got a lot going on”

Here's a fragment of "Rocky Balboa - Inspirational Speech": With this going on, it's gonna be worse than ever. - It don't have to be. - Sure it does. -Why? You got a lot goin' on, kid. And ...
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57 views

What's the meaning of “we couldn't shake it”

I've heard this phrase in a song, but I don't think its meaning lies in terms to get rid off something. I'll never forget you Although at times we couldn't shake it
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56 views

grammatical construct “sitting on the bench”

What is the grammatical construct or part of speech of the following two phrases in italics? Sitting on the bench, the tramp wondered about life. The tramp sitting on the bench wondered about ...
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19 views

Looking for the source of “SJO” or “South Jersey Original”?

Looking for source of "SJO" or "South Jersey Original" used to describe a person from Southern New Jersey whose behavior (usually idiosyncratic) is startling or otherwise worthy of note.
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28 views

The release stage in 'set down 'big pan'.

My question is: 'Set down' - /t/ is inaudibly released because of the 'plosive + plosive' combination. So /d/ in a word 'down' also should be inaudibly released, right? 'Big pan' - during my classes ...
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60 views

What is this type of “double-entry” phrase called?

What are the word combinations called? (Blank AND Blank) they are often used... Law and Order Judge and Jury Cops and Robbers Bait and Switch Cease and Desist Stop and Go Checks and ...
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414 views

Is there a difference between: “The coming year” and “next year”?

If it were now January, would "the coming year" be taken to mean this year? If it were November would "the coming year" refer to the next calendar year or a period running from November to November?
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947 views

What is the origin of “over index”?

I often encounter (and use) this phrase in a context meaning to weight more heavily during decision making than is sensible, or to focus more heavily during a discussion than is warranted. For ...
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32 views

Is it “a spyglass TO the past” or “a spyglass INTO the past”

I'd like to use the phrase XYZ as a spyglass (in)to the past. as title for a publication on a scientific method that allows me to infer knowledge about the past from data available now. E.g., the ...
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43 views

Everything but nothing

Hey guys does this phrase 'Everything but nothing' make sense? An example use: I know everything but nothing. This may sound slightly philosophical perhaps, but will that phrase be technically ...