A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Meaning of “all left reserved” and “all right reserved”?

Could somebody please clarify the meaning of these two expressions and the differences between them: "All Right Reserved" and "All Left Reserved"?
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4answers
606 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
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2answers
126 views

A word or idiom to describe an abusive parent who wants to keep their child

I just finished watching the video game Among the Sleep and at the end At the beginning of the game, the mother seems to cling onto the child possibly in memory of the little boy's father. At the ...
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2answers
705 views

Usage of “Don't remember”

In my language I can say "I don't remember I've ever watched that film" or "Never in my life have I remembered watching that film" to suggest that as far as I can remember I've never done something, ...
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22 views

How can I use phrase “Running Amok” , can I use “My running amok”?

I want to use "running amok" like "my running amok". Is that right or not? I want to use this phrase literary. Like "my running amok" or "my amok run" or "my run amok" etc. Please correct me.
4
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1answer
39 views

“I'll go with the candidate I'm used to” or “I'll go with the candidate to whom I am used?”

I'll go with the candidate I'm used to. I get that this is colloquial, but, c'mon. Ending a sentence with a preposition? However, is the alternative correct? I'll go with the candidate to whom ...
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0answers
18 views

To fail one another: meaning/translation [on hold]

"To fail one another" I have found the expression in a review on the novel Never let me go as well as in ecclesiastic contexts. What does it mean? If someone has a German translation, it would also ...
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0answers
29 views

What phrase is used to determine that your departed loved one has left an empty spot? [on hold]

"You left an empty spot (or space)" "Your empty space is showing" Which of these is grammatically correct? If none of the above, how would you lay that phrase out? P.S. They don't have to be dead. ...
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2answers
336 views

Question/Matter of definition?

A "Definitionsfråga", as it is called in Swedish, is for instance if you talk about what's good and bad, you can remark that it depends on what you mean by good and bad. You could might as well remark ...
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2answers
36 views

Where do I put this phrase in a phrase structure tree?

I am not sure where to put the AdvP in this sentence when drawing a phrase structure tree. This is the sentence I would like to create the tree for: "The car Sam bought last week won the big race." ...
0
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1answer
22 views

“More can be done yet” - correct use and position of the word “yet” [closed]

I want to say, despite the good progress, there are more that can be done. Are the following use and position of the word "yet" correct and convey the intended message? "More can be done yet." or "...
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7answers
2k views

A Pyrrhic defeat?

Is there a word, phrase or allusion which represents the opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory: a tactical defeat which led to a strategic victory, either accidental or intended? After all, there must be one ...
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2answers
60 views

China has been simmering with known for several years that … [on hold]

The following passage is quoted from the comments that Prof. Paul Krugman made during the meeting with Japanese officials on March 22, 2016 in Tokyo. I am wondering what the italic part means. I ...
7
votes
1answer
408 views

What does the title “Man Friday” mean? [on hold]

I was reading this book Gujarat files and suddenly I came across this word Narendra Modi’s Man Friday (describing Amit Shah) What does this title mean? And also is the word 'title' I used correct word ...
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2answers
568 views

Does this sentence use nominative absolute phrase?

A scientist, he always thinks about what is best for the people. Is this "a scientist" part a nominative absolute phrase? It seems like nominative absolute phrase has to have a verb or adjective ...
0
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1answer
34 views

Breaking sentences up

What is the right term for breaking or dividing a sentence into fragments, wherein each fragment still contains a thought/meaning? e.g.: Sports can ostracize people/ who are not very good at them./
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0answers
11 views

How do i say these titles better “Program Success Factors” and “Realized Benefits” [on hold]

How do i say these titles better Program Success Factors Realized Benefits I am doing a presentation for a CEO about a project. Needs to be strategic
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2answers
31 views

Should I use a comma after “noted that”?

Should I use a comma after "noted that" in the following sentence? Tom and Dick, while driving the car, noted that at speed bumps, the suspension was making noise. A preliminary Google ...
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5answers
140 views

What does “a bookstore-counting mood in Paris prompts soul-searching over Amazon’s 41 % share of new book sales in America” mean?

In the article titled “The French do buy books. Real books” appearing in New York Times (July 9), the author, Pamela Druckerman writes: “Recently when I was strolling through my museum-like ...
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1answer
50 views

What matters vs. what matter when starting a sentence

I am wondering if it would be better to write in the sentence below, "what matters most is" or "what matter most are," since what follows are two clauses. Or should "what" stand as the singular ...
3
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0answers
75 views

Is the meaning of **I'll keep an eye out for it** understood outside of the UK ? [on hold]

I sometime write in emails : I'll keep an eye out for it OR I'll keep an eye out for your email Im in the UK and i think that the majority on english speakers in the UK would understand this, ...
9
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1answer
323 views

Is it correct to use “rescued to a place”?

I want to write a sentence in which someone is rescued and then taken to a safe place. Can I write it in following way: ? The man was rescued to a safe place.
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30 views

Use of the phrase “Doesn't count.” [on hold]

Two people are playing backgammon. One tosses the dice. The other thinks that the one who tossed the dice cheated. Will it be meaningful for him to say "Toss them again, this doesn't count."
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votes
2answers
54 views

“Acted together” or “played together” or ? in a movie

I am looking for a correct and common phrase to describe that people were actors in the same movie(s): An example is: "Walter Matthau and Jack Lemmon acted together in The Odd Couple and Grumpy Old ...
3
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1answer
59 views

Origin of the phrase “go west” (to die)

I was curious, what is the origin of the phrase "to go west" or "to pass into the west" (as in the sense of to die)?
3
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1answer
71 views

What is a gift called that is given to you to possess and keep but can be taken back at any time?

I have this gift that was given to me as a present for my birthday, but was informed that is not mine permanently but to keep until my friend wants it back. What is that kind of gift called?
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5answers
7k views

Around how old is “a woman of a certain age”?

"A woman of a certain age" is a common saying. It means more than "a woman of a given age", "a woman who could be any age" or "female, without respect to age". It's usage instead seems to suggest a ...
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1answer
103 views

Articles before percentages earned?

When writing about grades, does the percentage need an article? "Jenny earned an 87% in the AP Psychology course." Or just "Jenny earned 87% in the AP Psychology course." My thinking is, you would use ...
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1answer
190 views

Using “One day before”

I want to express the following thing; Do your homework at least one day before the submission deadline. Suppose the 2nd person knows about this submission deadline thing (or may be clear from ...
0
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1answer
37 views

Term that describes an incomplete comparison

What is the term for a dichotomous statement like, "The two side of the issue are the fish should be protected, or it should not." That is, the other side of the issue is not fully explained, it's ...
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0answers
31 views

I know this/that [closed]

When someone tells you something that you already know, which is the correct response ? "I know this" or "I know that"? thanks
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2answers
55 views

What is another way to say “I needed to explore beyond my comfort zone”? [closed]

I'm writing an essay for medical school applications. Both my parents were physicians, so it is what I was familiar with growing up. Instead of pursuing medicine in college, I decided to pursue ...
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0answers
18 views

What is another way to say “Helped me find clarity in my life”?

I'm trying to say that a certain experience helped me realize what I want to do with my life because it helped me better understand myself. I'm trying to find an expression that communicates this that ...
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2answers
80 views

Active to passive in this sentence

I'm trying to convert the following sentence from the active voice to passive. It has two verbs, and I don't know how to link all parts. A recent study found that posting photos of oneself ...
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2answers
110 views

Meaning of “available soon” (from a test item)

stackexchange! I've been referring to this site for a while now and have finally decided to join you all. This is a semantics and use question about the phrase "available soon" that appeared as part ...
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0answers
12 views

Usage of “except verb” phrase [closed]

I found a dictionary said the form of "expect + verb" is "A verb form after except usually depends on what came before" so are these answers correct? 1) He can't do anything except make things more ...
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0answers
23 views

Is there an expression, “to have purvey of”?

I am looking for a way to say that one "has full view of." For example: "When touring the construction site, we had ____ of the building's electrical and plumbing systems." What comes to mind is "...
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votes
6answers
11k views

Is ‘on (in) a tear’ a popular idiom?

I was drawn to the phrase, ‘on a tear’ that I heard in audio in this week’s Barron’s magazine (June 6) reporting the good sales and profit performance of U.S. sneaker chain, Foot Locker: It says: ...
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votes
2answers
433 views

“List of tasks” or “tasks' list”

Which of these forms is better: list of tasks or tasks' list? Another question is whether I should use an apostrophe or not (tasks's list vs tasks list). Other phrases which are similar to this, but ...
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votes
2answers
684 views

What is the origin of “Here's How!”?

I own an antique store and found a canapé plate of a bar scene and two gentlemen toasting. The words under the scene are "Here's How!" What is the country of origin? This plate is dated 1933 from a ...
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0answers
50 views

Does this adverb prepositional phrase modify the adverb, or vice versa?

The McGraw Hill Handbook of English Grammar and Usage (pg. 42) gives "We got there late in the evening" as an example of an adverb prepositional phrase ('in the evening') modifying an adverb ('late'). ...
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2answers
529 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...
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1answer
39 views

what is the correct way to write birth day greetings [closed]

what is the correct way to write birthday greetings "Happy birth day"or we can write Wish you a "Happy Birth Anniversary" to living person??
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0answers
28 views

in place vs on site

I am reading a book on building construction which describes different constructural members in one chapter. Some of them are not prefabricated items ie. they are formed/fabricated in place/ on site. ...
2
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1answer
84 views

non-progressive, habitual actions

What is the difference between the following sentences? Even in those days he played golf on Wednesday. Even in those days he played golf on every Wednesday. Even in those days he played ...
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1answer
2k views

'Given a choice' vs.'If I had to choose'

Can the phrases given a choice and if I had to choose be used interchangeably? I made a statement like "Given a choice, I would do this," my original intention being to select that over the other ...
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0answers
74 views

“He is no different than you and I” or “He is no different than you and me”

I have no difficulty in normal cases knowing whether to say "you and I"or "You and me." But this situation confuses me. On one hand, I can justify I by saying there is an implied "are" at the end: ...
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1answer
41 views

'a same matrix' or 'the same matrix'?

Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and fusion center can let the pseudo-random number generators generate the same matrix A. Or Synchronizing only a seed between the local sites and ...
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votes
2answers
615 views

For an old girl, she moves fast [closed]

What does the following phrase generally mean? For an old girl, she moves fast. For a saber, you are pretty soft. For a guy I barely know, you are really starting to annoy me. Does the ...
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0answers
33 views

Origin of “Come for the X, stay for the Y” [closed]

What's the origin of the phrase "Come for the X, stay for the Y", such as a toxicologist saying "Come for the inland taipans, stay for the platypodes"? I tried looking up onelook, but it wasn't able ...