A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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29 views

is it correct to use 'often a times'?

Does the phrase "often a times" exist? If so, what is the correct way to use it? Would the following sentence be correct? I have seen him loafing about in the streets often a times.
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1answer
12 views

Use of 'such as themselves'?

Would it be correct to use the following sentence? The group make for a handsome lot. And that poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves. I have been ...
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1answer
21 views

What is the meaning of “read of”?

I saw this phrase in a sentence. Here it is: He read of the room that was prepared at the palace at Rheims for the use of Queen. What does it mean?
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2answers
32 views

So far, so obvious

What is the meaning of "So far, so obvious"? Does it mean "Although out of expectation, it is actually true"?
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4answers
67 views

Soft or more euphemistic way of saying “suffer”

One word I can think of is "bear". Any other words for it? I hate the idea of repeating the same word again and again. I want to use it for trivial things which make your life inconvenient but not ...
2
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1answer
25 views

For those that like that sort of thing, that is the sort of thing they like

Can any one please explain the saying: "For those that like that sort of thing, that is the sort of thing they like" Does it mean: When someone likes some sort of thing, that sort of thing is ...
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3answers
33 views

But I would say that, wouldn’t I?

What does it mean when after a personal statement someone says "But I would say that, wouldn’t I?"? Does it mean "any way, it is my idea"?
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4answers
8k views

Where does “beat around the bush” come from?

Where does the expression "beat around the bush" come from?
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1answer
19 views

care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors

Which of the phrases best describes the general responsibility for people who are under-age? care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors
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2answers
31 views

Can we use “around about” like this?

Can we use "around about" together as in the following sentence? The building was built around about 2 years ago.
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6answers
16k views

Meaning and usage of “to no end”

What does the phrase mean in "He annoys me to no end"? Literally, does it mean that he annoys me forever? Or does it mean that he annoys me to no result?
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1answer
71 views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Year of built”?

Is it grammatically correct to say: Year of built 1922 when talking about house or some other building? I know i should probably use phrase: Built in 1922 or just Built 1922 but I ...
0
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3answers
337 views

“Martyr To” vs “Martyr For”

This book specifies the difference as: martyr for something: smb. who is made to suffer severely for a cause martyr to something: smb. who is acutely inflicted by something Oxford ...
2
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1answer
31 views

How do you mean vs What do you mean?

What do people mean when they say How do you mean? Are they asking me to explain what I just said? Then how is it different from What do you mean?
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6answers
3k views

Is ‘toss a bone to somebody’ a popular English idiom?

I came across the phrase ‘toss a bone’ in the headline of the New York Times article (July 15) in its Business section that reads “As a Watchdog Starves, Wall Street Is Tossed a Bone.” I checked ...
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1answer
121 views

What types of words/phrases are “this” “here” & “they”?

I'm currently doing an analytic essay on my drama coursework (fun.). I'd like to explain how the playwright never reveals the exact setting of the act, by using only phrases such as "this","here", and ...
3
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2answers
58 views

Phrase/expression for “growing at my own speed”

I'm writing the acknowledgments-section of my thesis and want to thank my academic advisor for his patience and support, and for allowing me to "grow at my own speed". I'm looking for a concise way to ...
2
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1answer
78 views

How common is 'Sweet as' in the rest of the world?

In New Zealand, we have slang 'Sweet as', which means 'That's ok', 'No problems', 'All good'. eg. Sorry I'm not going to be able to make it today, my child is sick. Sweet as - can you do ...
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0answers
22 views

Positive connotation Trojan horse?

There's a new app from Amazon called Amazon Underground. It supposedly provides 10,000 free non-IAP games. But what's the catch? Seems like the only thing it does it get the Amazon storefront to the ...
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3answers
46 views

What's the function of 'adding to' here [on hold]

As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to pay their tribute to the dead, adding to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral. I just read this and I wondered what adding to means ...
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5answers
331 views

What is the origin of “on the way”?

Consider "on the way." (As in "are you coming home?" "we're on the way.") Is the origin from something relating to "way" meaning a lane or roadway, or, is the origin something relating to the ...
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11answers
8k views

“You get what you deserve nothing more nothing less”

In this world we reside, what we acquire depends on what we can acquire. In other words, if we have the money to, we can buy a house; if we have the necessary educational qualifications to, we can get ...
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4answers
564 views

I like dog or I like dogs which is correct and why?

Why do we say 'I like dogs'? Why can't we say 'I like dog' if we are referring to a particular dog? Most people use 'I like dogs'. Which is correct and why?
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1answer
50 views

Does “differ by” even exist?

I have a question about the preposition for differ in the following context: A differs B merely from a chemical element. Or better to say: A differs B by a chemical element. I will ...
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4answers
71 views

A word to describe “the presence of someone/something has little or no significance in a given situation”?

I am trying to use a single word/simple sentence to explain a situation where adding/not adding a part to a device won't make any difference to its functionality.
0
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1answer
99 views

semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
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2answers
120 views

What does it mean to “gum the spoon”?

I recently found out about a new term. It's "gum the spoon". What does it mean? By the various contexts I found, I conjecture that it means to add saliva onto the spoon or to hold the spoon in one's ...
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14answers
6k views

Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?

Is there a word or an idiom for rich people who spend only their families' money and do not bother to work, just fool around?
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0answers
36 views

Sentence doesn't “feel” right, but is it really incorrect?

A friend of mine wrote this sentence: 'The material consists of crumbly blocks, but they are still sturdy enough to not fall apart during bumpy transport.' To me this grates a bit. Even though the ...
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3answers
96 views

The phrase “more sharp” vs “sharper”

So I was talking to my fiancee and she said "more sharp" to which I said "you mean sharper?". This is in context of talking about her current earrings being "more sharp" then her usual ones. She then ...
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2answers
51 views

Meaning of the phrase “without breaking down” [closed]

Computers are very reliable; they can work for a long time without breaking down. What does the phrase “without breaking down” mean in this sentence?
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2answers
44k views
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2answers
67 views

what does the phrase “a real word” mean?

I'm interested in how a word becomes "a real word" in English, and what constitutes that "real word" when it exists. Twentyfive questions appear in the list of questions already asked on this forum ...
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2answers
89 views

Usage of the phrase “over his lifetime”

Is it appropriate to use the phrase "over his lifetime" for in introducing someone if the person is still alive, i.e. "...his dedication to music over his lifetime..."
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6answers
12k views

“anymore” vs. “any more”

any more requests anymore requests Are these two the same? It seems that "any more requests" is grammatically correct while "anymore requests" is not. Am I right? Why are they different?
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0answers
26 views

Common phrases for “won't be classmates”

First, here's the context. There are these two kids who have been classmates ever since, but unfortunately they won't be classmates in the following year. What phrases can I use to describe this ...
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1answer
161 views

Use of “don't mention it” for “you're welcome”?

In which American regions is "don't mention it" used for "you're welcome"?
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0answers
31 views

What does the expression “that about sums it up” mean in the context provided in the question? [closed]

This phrase is taken from the Lost series, in particular from Episode 3, in case that rings any bells for anyone. Basically, the question that I have is, what does this phrase mean: That's about ...
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5answers
96 views

Alternative for “found something accidentally even when it was lying really close the whole time”

Let me give you an example of the situation where I would like to use this "word/phrase/idiom/expression". A friend of mine who had a laptop for 3 months now accidentally discovers that it is ...
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3answers
5k views

What does “imperio in imperium” mean?

I've heard the Latin phrase imperio in imperium used in political discussions a few times. While I understand what the phrase literally means in Latin ("by command into command"), I'm not sure what ...
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1answer
40 views

Which of the given phrases is correct?

Is the price negotiable for the job? OR Is the job price negotiable? Which is the correct phrase formation to be asked formally and please tell me the reason for its correctness. Thank you.
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1answer
56 views

Sentence Structures [closed]

Who told Thuzar about the accident? Microscopic insects can only be seen through a microscope. The bees stung the workman to death. The Tun Foundation presented our school with a generous donation. ...
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4answers
63 views

Phrase for advocacy group having a disincentive to achieve its stated goal?

There are many advocacy groups that have goals, such that, if and when their goal is achieved, they would essentially become obsolete and have no need to exist anymore. Hence, there is something of a ...
2
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3answers
117 views

Let me all know what you think

I'm wondering about a certain phrase which I use without thinking about. One of my developers whose first language isn't English pointed it out, and it left me thinking if I've been saying it wrong. ...
0
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1answer
121 views

“driving across the state” or “driving across state”?

Is it "driving across state" like "driving across town", or "driving across THE state", like "driving across the country"?
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5answers
86 views

What would I call this computer science dilemma?

In computer science, programming languages like Java, C++, and Python are considered to be very popular. C++ is considered low-level, Java is considered mid-level, and Python is considered high-level. ...
0
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1answer
113 views

How to ask politely for the caller's name on a phone call

In case I've received a call and I don't know the caller I want to politely ask the name of the caller. What should I say in this situation?
1
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1answer
25 views

What is the origin of “sewn up”?

As in a guaranteed thing. For example, "Bill has twice the sales of anyone else on the floor so the sales competition is pretty well sewn up." I've tried to think of various metaphors it could be ...
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2answers
100 views

“two children were born out of this wedlock” is the usage correct?

Stella and David married in 1995. two children were born out of this wedlock. Is the usage "out of" correct?
0
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1answer
51 views

catch eye but not eyes

We say “something caught my eye" but not "eyes", why only one eye is caught and the other is free? I am not a native English speaker and this seems pretty strange to me as not being an one-eyed ...