A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Meaning of : “as above so below as within so without”

What is the meaning of "as above so below as within so without". Although its meaning is given in yahoo answers but it is perplexed. Please light through it.
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0answers
84 views

Somebody is gonna kiss the donkey

I heard this phrase when I was watching Battleship. An old man said, "Somebody is gonna kiss the donkey." I do not know what it means, I only heard it in a movie. What is this phrase mean? ...
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3answers
6k views

What is the etymology of “Tough titty”

This is a phrase I've heard used on several occasions by different people. I'm interested about what it's origins are, and whether it should be considered rude. Essentially it means "That's tough ...
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0answers
25 views

Can I say “B eacon in resources”?

Context: I've a website which is resources repository and "B eacon in resources" (without space) would be its tagline. This makes sense for me but I'm not sure if it's correct way to say this since ...
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3answers
2k views

'last but foremost' - mixture of 'last but not least' and 'first and foremost'

I found '...last but foremost...' with google in some texts, which seems to be some combination of 'last but not least' and 'first and foremost'. Seems to suggest that while something is mentioned ...
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43 views

What is a Tent pole moment?

At a marketing meeting a speaker used the term tent pole moment. I have no idea what she meant. Is anyone familiar with the phrase?
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3answers
34 views

postmodifying phrase/under the leadership of [on hold]

Are these sentences correct: Such activities found favor with the social democrats under the leadership of Schmidt. Such activities found favor with the social democrats , under the leadership of ...
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3answers
236 views

Is there a word or phrase for someone whose ominous remarks come true?

Someone who makes such comments as: "Look at his car tyres! He is inviting an accident." (and he does suffer an accident minutes later.) "I never have shrimps with pepper. You're likely to ...
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1answer
89 views

Not too expensive vs affordable

I'm building a website and I need to choose between 'not too expensive' and 'affordable'. The sentence: Reliable, stable, secure, great support and of course not too expensive! or Reliable, ...
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8answers
2k views

Why does “go spare” mean “get angry”?

I don't know whether the phrase "go spare" is used in the US, but it is very common in the UK. e.g. You're an hour late. Mum's going spare upstairs! I would like to know where the phrase comes ...
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2k views

What do they mean with “Hi, how are you doing”? [migrated]

When I was in New York the workers at the counter (in a shop) always said Hi, how are you doing I was, and still am very confused if they just mean "hello", or actually want to know how I feel. ...
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2answers
643 views

'Sometime back' or 'Sometimes back'?

How should I decide between "sometime back" and "sometimes back"? Sometime back I received a call from Mr. X Sometimes back I received a call from Mr. X Which sentence is correct?
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4answers
66 views

proper word or phrase for 'already eaten or drank by other person/animal' [duplicate]

Is there a single word or a short phrase to better describe a consumable item (e.g. drink or food) that has already been nibbled or sipped at? The relevance of this word or phrase would be in a ...
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1answer
45 views

Is there a noun form for “fine-grained”?

For example I want to say: ...the level of (fine-grained in noun) that is needed... I wonder if the word "grainery" will work.
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0answers
47 views

Problem with “at least you're not starving in Africa” saying [on hold]

Maybe you've heard this saying, maybe you haven't. However, this phrase I hear a lot and it bothers me. I see the logic as being flawed with good intentions. People usually use this when they are ...
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3answers
59 views

Using 'send' in passive voice

You are sent this e-mail because... Is this correctly worded or does it sound weird? I ask because I think I've seen similar wordings, such as "you are being sent X because Y", but I'm not at all ...
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1answer
24 views

Phrase: give pause

What exactly does the phrase give (sb.) pause mean? Is it just a simple shortening of the following?: give pause to someone (or give someone pause for thought) cause someone to think ...
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6answers
27k views

Original Meaning of Blood is thicker than water, is it real?

I recently read that the phrase "Blood is thicker than water" originally derived from the phrase "the blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb", implying that the ordinary meaning ...
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2answers
105 views

“I'm flabbergasted!” - Old fashioned? Pedantic? Refined? Educated? [on hold]

To flabbergast - to overwhelm with shock, surprise, or wonder. "I'm flabbergasted!" - I have only one friend who uses this phrase, so I can't figure out what kind of person uses it. Although ...
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1answer
56 views

“Rule the Roast” and “Rule the Roost”

John Ayto, Oxford Dictionary of English Idioms (2009) has this entry for "rule the roost": rule the roost be in complete control The original expression was rule the roast, which was common ...
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2answers
757 views

“Try to save” or “try saving”

Are both try to save the file and try saving the file grammatically correct? If so, is there any difference in meaning?
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5answers
7k views

Where and when did “Bucket List” come to mean what it does today?

I'm not sure I had even heard the term "bucket list" until the movie came out. I get the feeling though that the term long predates the movie. Can anyone identify how "bucket list" came to mean what ...
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4answers
11k views

“Interested in knowing” versus “interested to know”

I am interested to know if, for some, there is a subtle difference between the two phrases in the title. I am equally interested in knowing if there is a subtle difference.
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1answer
61 views

He didn't so much as thank me OR to thank me?

I have heard both ways 'He didn't so much as thank me' and 'He didn't so much as to thank me'. Which is correct and is the other wrong or can it be used colloquially? Thank you.
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2answers
98 views

I will learn better English — should it be “I will learn English better.”

Somehow, I think "better English" is incorrect, because I think there isn't better English; English is English. But I hear this phrase from other ESL students a lot. Is this correct way of saying it? ...
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4answers
80 views

is there any word that means “current and upcoming”?

I want to find a word that could mean current and upcoming but couldn't. Or is there any other shorter ways to describe it? can anyone help me?
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1answer
35 views

“to be completed” vs. “which will be completed” [closed]

In an email, I wrote: "I've pasted a link that leads to my application list, which will be completed once I hear back from schools about their engineering school admissions policies." Is the use of ...
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2answers
80 views

What did Kate mean when she said: “(…)? Or did Big Pussy and Meadow miss you too much?”

In the 2014 film “The Other Woman”, there is an exchange between several characters Phil: Who's this? Carmela: I'm Carmela, Kate's decorator. Phil: Oh. Really? When did you fire ...
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0answers
102 views

What does “A Gossip Girl in Sweet Valley with traveling pants” mean?

In the 2010 film Easy A, there is an exchange between several characters: Rhiannon: Aren't you supposed to be like, eternally in love with him, and shit? Olive Penderghast: Yes, I believe ...
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2answers
52 views

“As I go” expression

Could anyone please tell me what "as I go" means? Like in the following context: I will fill it out as I go.
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1answer
48 views

“largest of any mammal” vs. “largest of all mammals”

A: This animal is the largest of any mammal. vs. B: This animal is the largest of all mammals. What are the subtle differences between A and B?
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3answers
201 views

Is it ever correct to call someone “Great British”?

People from Britain are referred to as British. However I recently learned that Britain is not technically the same as Great Britain. Source 1 Great Britain and Britain do not mean the same ...
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6answers
3k views

What does “soft bigotry of low expectations” mean?

There was the following question from a reader and the answer by Charles Blow under the headline, “Your Questions, Answered” in the Opinion Page of May 7 New York Times. I invited you to ask me ...
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3answers
8k views

Why is “Garden Leave” so called?

"Garden Leave" is a fairly common British term. According to wikipedia: Garden leave describes the practice whereby an employee who is leaving a job (having resigned or otherwise had his or her ...
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2answers
35 views

Meaning of “playing of favorites”?

I am came across this phrase in a CR presentation (slide #19). What is its meaning? Equanimity – Less “playing of favorites” with people, compassion
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2answers
271 views

Is "grit and resolve” a popular phrase?

In the article of Time (May 5th) titled “Obama aspire to do Big Things,” I noticed Press Secretary Jay Curney used the word, ‘grit and resolve’ followed by “(and) not in a John Wayne way, but in a ...
5
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4answers
775 views

Bless your heart

Is "bless your heart" something only used by old women in the South (all I've ever heard)? Or is it ever appropriate for a man to use it without seeming unmanly? Does the term always have ...
0
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1answer
27 views

Why not “virtual estate” instead of “screen real estate”?

In English usage in many disciplines, like articles on Web designing, people frequently use the word "screen real estate" or "viewport (browser window size) real estate" or even "mobile or browser ...
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3answers
6k views

“my friend” vs “a friend of mine”

I always found it weird to hear people say things like "My friend asked me to come" (with no prior mention of said friend), as opposed to "A friend of mine asked me to come". To me it seems as though ...
2
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2answers
98 views

Is this a correct English sentence: “I'm not quite well enough ready yet.”

I was talking to someone recently and blurted out as I had to move on to another task "I am not quite well enough ready yet" which sparked a discussion about if that was correct English. Although I'll ...
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2answers
3k views

Meaning of “What gave it away”

I came across a phrase in Seinfeld, it wrotes: (Claire passes the table; George stops her and writes something on his notepad.) GEORGE: Claire, Claire, you’re a woman, right? CLAIRE: ...
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2answers
2k views

Exact meaning of “Tyranny of Distance”

In Australia, I often hear the phrase "the Tyranny of Distance", but I'm not exactly sure what it means. I know that the phrase originated from The Tyranny of Distance: How Distance Shaped ...
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1answer
53 views

To be is to be perceived

Can someone explain me this phrase attributed to Berkely Wikipedia In Principles #3, he wrote, using a combination of Latin and English, esse is percipi, (to be is to be perceived), most often ...
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2answers
94 views

How to specify the letter O, not a zero

Imagine a technical specification that reads: In the text box, enter "O1" (O the letter, not the number zero) Is there a convention which achieves this explanation more succinctly, or is more ...
35
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4answers
3k views

Term for something that is supposed to increase safety, but really just increases fear?

Some examples: A news station giving daily "terrorist reports". It doesn't actually say how to protect yourself, just gives information on how horrible they are & why you should be afraid. A ...
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3answers
21k views

Is “Thanks a ton” a commonly used phrase?

Is it correct to say so? Does this mean the same as "thanks a lot"?
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10answers
3k views

phrases: “marry a guy and he'll provide”

Trying to find a similar phrase to this Chinese phrase: 嫁汉嫁汉,穿衣吃饭 which basically means if a woman marries a guy, then the guy will provide food and clothing. I can't think of anything off the top ...
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6answers
128 views

Is there a phrase to describe a ready-to-throw-away phone?

I am looking for a phrase that describes a really crappy mobile phone, which has become so dysfunctional that it is ready to be thrown away
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2answers
819 views

Is “with respect to” wrong?

My English professor suggested yesterday that the expression "with respect to", despite being frequently used is simply wrong. He said that one should rather use "in respect of", which in turn is not ...
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1answer
20 views

Is “this object remains a valid inclusion in a discussion of similar objects” grammatically correct?

The wider context within which I am writing this phrase is: "What is certain, however, is that early twentieth-century piano rolls, while not themselves audio recordings, remain a valid inclusion in ...