A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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semantic difference for the forms: “x of y” vs. “x of the y” vs. “y x”

As a non-native speaker, I have a problem understanding the difference in meaning of the following forms: "… of …" "… of the …" "… …" To be more specific, let me give some instances: "theory of ...
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Is “I wish I had one of those …” correctly used in the following sentence?

Sex Education Club? I wish I had one of those when I was a student. The bolded part actually means, I wish my university had had one of those so I could have joined . . . But I picked I wish I ...
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26 views

How do I reword this sentence as an effective description for a resume?

I took over the bookkeeping for a small company after they had been methodically robbed (over the course of a year) by their previous bookkeeper. How do I word this in a manner appropriate for use on ...
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36 views

“Thought of” vs. “thought about”. What's the difference? [duplicate]

What's the difference between "thought of" and "thought about"? One difference I'm aware of is that you use "thought of" when something comes to mind but you don't analyze it, and "thought about" if ...
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1answer
140 views

Help understanding a sentence/reference

The introductory paragraph of the book An Introduction to Mathematics, written for general audience by the great British mathematician Alfred North Whitehead goes like this: Chapter 1: THE ...
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human language and libary [on hold]

1.please help me out to solve this question by using four points to argue your case for the functions of human language.(2)this question is about library what information can students/researchers ...
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2answers
64 views

Usage of the phrase “over his lifetime”

Is it appropriate to use the phrase "over his lifetime" for in introducing someone if the person is still alive, i.e. "...his dedication to music over his lifetime..."
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117 views

What's the meaning of “that's saying a lot.”?

I heard somebody say a couple of things and they concluded by saying "and that's saying a lot". What does it mean? Does it mean it's a bit of a big deal? or an achievement of sorts? Some example ...
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76 views

Use of “don't mention it” for “you're welcome”?

In which American regions is "don't mention it" used for "you're welcome"?
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6answers
675 views

Another way to say “it never hurts”

It wouldn't hurt you to be a bit more serious. Wouldn't/won't/never hurts make perfect sense in this example. I'm wondering if there's any alternative way to preserve the meaning of this phrase in a ...
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2answers
318 views

How can I ask about a confirmation? [closed]

Two heroes are available. Hero #1: Please, send me an URL to that site. Here #2: Go to www.bla.bla. Is it true that you look for? Is the phrase "Is it true that you look for" correct? How ...
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1answer
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“answered in” or “answered”?

I'm confused whether the verb answer should come with the preposition in or without it in a sentence "the timing a question will be answered in is important" or "the timing a question will be answered ...
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5answers
59 views

What is the word that describes a demanding look?

Is there an idiom or a single verb for a patronizing stare or a demanding look? As if someone can speak with his looks and says something like "No!", "Stop!", "Do it now!" and makes people obey no ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the action called when a grumpy old man shows that he is annoyed, by making a 'throat-clearing' sound?

Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Is there a more appropriate word or an idiom for that?
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374 views

Use of the word “definitive edition”

Can I use the phrase "definitive edition" to explain that a product has the most up-to-date and highest quality in the field as opposite to mean "last edition of the same series"? Thank you for your ...
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0answers
40 views

Need help solving these analogies [on hold]

1: audacious is to trepidation as: a)loquacious is to apathy b)irrational is to reason c)licentious is to pride d)impudent is to confidence e)timorous is to afraid 2: reckless is to caution as ...
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1answer
26 views

Which is the correct sentence? [on hold]

I want to know, out of following, which is the correct sentence? 1. I am not suppose to issue warning letters. 2. I do not suppose to issue warning letters. 3. I suppose not to issue warning letters. ...
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3answers
9k views

What does "kind of sums things up” mean?

I came across the phrase, kind of sums things up in the article written by Dana Milbank in Washington Post (July 20) under the headline The new party of Reagan. The phrase appears in the following ...
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1answer
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Meaning and origin of “Get someone's shirt out”

I was wondering to myself about the word "shirty". It seemed so curious a word. After all, what did its meaning have to do with shirts. "Were the two words even related?", I wondered. So I looked up ...
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7answers
67 views

Is there a word or an idiom for respecting someone because you are afraid of him?

I am looking for a word or an idiom about showing respect to someone superior in work because you are afraid of him. I'm not talking about real respect or showing respect to him or his works, just ...
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2answers
40 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
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1answer
44 views

Expression of “relationship”

If I want to describe “the relationship between A and B as well as the relationship between A and C”.(A, B, C are things), should I say “the relationship of A to B and C” Or “the ...
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2answers
42 views

Should I use 'follow lemma (1)' or 'follow from lemma (1)'?

In mathematical papers, some theorems are proved based on some existing lemmas. Then, should I use Following lemma (1), we prove... or Following from lemma (1), we prove...
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29 views

Is the phrase “horizon road” grammatically correct? [on hold]

Is the phrase "horizon road" grammatically correct, and if so, is it equal to "road to horizon"?
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2answers
42 views

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct? [duplicate]

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct?. In some published papers, I either see 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' used in some sentences or phrases. Can someone justify and comment?
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3k views

What do you mean by 'spark somebody up'?

I have searched throughout the internet to find the real meaning but was at loss.
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3answers
59 views

is the phrase “available with me” correct? [closed]

I used a bus in which the hostess said that the company magazine is available with me on demand. Is the usage of available along with with correct?
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40 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
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65 views

Isn't it redundant to use “then” after “if”?

Since "if P, Q" is grammatical, is it not the case that the "then" in "if P, then Q" is redundant? Where P and Q are clauses. For example, "if it rains today, the road shall be wet tomorrow" is ...
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113 views

What does you are getting reamed mean? [on hold]

Ms C is accusing Ms Z of eating the cheese that Ms C bought. Ms C and Ms Z are room mates. Ms C sees a therapist about it. Ms Z: I don't eat that kind of cheese. Ms C: You do eat that kind ...
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1answer
45 views

What does You play to pay mean? Thanks.

Actually it's from comedy, Weird loners. What does You play to pay mean? Thanks. Text from phone : Where's my money ? I know where you live. You play to pay ! 1K tomorrow. In case you can't ...
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3answers
4k views

Meaning and Origin of “Honky Tonk”

Monday morning. A colleague of mine is blasting country music from his cube...fantastic. After hearing the word "honky" and "honky tonk" quite a few times, I'm intrigued. This is obviously a ...
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A Pyrrhic defeat?

Is there a word, phrase or allusion which represents the opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory: a tactical defeat which led to a strategic victory, either accidental or intended? After all, there must be one ...
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A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. My supervisor told me it is informal English, but I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment ...
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37 views

From/Since time immemorial

Which is correct? 'From' or 'Since' when applied to 'time immemorial'? I have seen both around, and have a feeling it might be 'from', but would like to check.
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2answers
40 views

american english phrase request grammar [duplicate]

Is it proper to say: Please join me, my family and crew in celebrating my Bat Mitzvah? Or should there be a'my' before crew? Thank you!
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phrase “call names” [closed]

It had happened many years ago. One teacher at the Art class 'offended' my cool picture of the super-duper space ship. He said it was a crasy, metal flying high-boot. Now, how should I say that he ...
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Meaning of the phrase “empty your pipe against the heel of your boot” [closed]

Not being a native English speaker, I'm reading What to Talk About to improve my communication skills. While reading, I came across this phrase: empty your pipe against the heel of your boot. I ...
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0answers
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Please suggest me a decent name for my project? [closed]

I am a third year computer science engineering student and I have made a software for my college. The problem I am facing is in naming it. My project is the entire college itself i.e. it has ...
2
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4answers
578 views

Phrase for having nearly completed something

Is there is a phrase for when you're very close to achieving something you've been working on? When the detective gets that final clue, but hasn't quite solved the mystery yet. When you've done 90% ...
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What's the proper phrase for “ way behind~”

I am trying to write a sentence like Country X is way behind in terms of animal rights compared to other countries. I think the phrase way behind is colloquial but I cannot think of a “proper” ...
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5answers
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Is ‘toss a bone to somebody’ a popular English idiom?

I came across the phrase ‘toss a bone’ in the headline of the New York Times article (July 15) in its Business section that reads “As a Watchdog Starves, Wall Street Is Tossed a Bone.” I checked ...
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1answer
49 views

Is “be my guests” correctly used in the following case?

Speaker A: We want to ask you some questions. If you don't mind, of course. Speaker B: [He opens the door of his house] Sure, be my guests. Is the idiom being used correctly? If not, what ...
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4answers
1k views

Etymology of “Given up the ghost”

What is the origin of the phrase "Given up the ghost"? e.g. "After 10 years, my DVD player has finally given up the ghost." Does it have a religious connotation?
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3answers
102 views

“A friar's hand”?

I'm reading "To Rise Again at a Decent Hour" by Joshua Ferris, and the narrator/author talks about looking over the shoulder of someone studying the Bible on the subway, and noticing that there are ...
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2answers
944 views

Why does “footing the bill” mean “to pay”?

I hear people using the term footing the bill used to describe paying for something. Why is the verb foot used to describe the meaning of paying?
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2answers
55 views

Is the phrase “…could only know by then” correct?

He told me he would give me the answer after the trip. Was there something he could only know by then? I don't know why but it sounds a little weird to me. Anyway, to make sure I searched on ...
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89 views

What is the “theoretical” counterpart to “hands-on”?

Situation: an educational event may have two parts. In the first theoretical part, we explain the approach, big picture, some theoretical principles. In the second practical part, we give the ...
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Question on using the phrase “draw on” in context.

Is this a proper use? "He is an icon in that he acts as a symbol to draw on."