A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

6
votes
9answers
369 views

Idiom or Expression related to Nepotism

I'm looking for an idiom or expression that relates to someone who is promoted to get them out of a department because they can't be fired due to politics, possibly nepotism. The promotion is not ...
4
votes
5answers
181 views

Phrase to describe the “act of sharing an opinion”

I am writing a research paper on the use of social media for the purpose of terrorism. For one of my supporting statements, I am attempting to describe how social media connects users with similar ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Nicely packed story - a better way to say it? [closed]

"She told us a story, it was a very nicely packed story but..." Is there a better way to say "nicely packed story"? There was this person who gave us a speech and she shared a personal story. It was ...
3
votes
3answers
113 views

Word or Phrase for Smart and Difficult to work with [closed]

A coworker and I are having a discussion about a very smart person we work with who is also very difficult to deal with. We both feel like there is a word or phrase out there to describe this type ...
-1
votes
2answers
50 views

“be so kind to to sg” [closed]

I would like to ask somebody politely to accept an invitation. Which is the correct form "please be so kind to accept it" or "be so kind and accept it"
4
votes
2answers
128 views

What would you call a person that is so scared of losing their own life that they will go so far as to risk the lives of others?

What would you call a person that is so scared of losing their own life that they will go so far as to risk the lives of others? I'm trying to think of a word that expresses the meaning of someone who ...
0
votes
1answer
55 views

The word noggin [duplicate]

Where did the word "noggin" originate? My daughter was talking to her friend and the expression "your noggin" was used. Then one had asked the other, "where did that phrase come from originally?"
1
vote
0answers
18 views

How did “that is” evolve into informal “as in”? [closed]

Someone might write: Our ​friends, that is to say ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. Yet, say: Our ​friends, as in ​our son's ​friends, will ​meet us at the ​airport. How ...
6
votes
3answers
124 views

Ironic phrase for something becoming more complicated specifically because of efforts to 'simplify' it?

My linguistic skills fail me and I'd like some advice. I have a project that currently works exactly as intended, short and sweet, yet a higher up has changed their mind and are asking for it to be ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

How to describe someone with an adjective? [closed]

I want to say that 'If I should give you an adjective that would be '. Although I am not sure if this is correct or if there is any better way to say that?
7
votes
2answers
82 views

Which phrase do you use to describe someone trying to do a thing that might/should be done better by you?

Let's say: You're very good at computer stuff, such as programming, fixing hardware, etc. When it comes to things like that, you're one of the best, if not the best! And one day, a friend comes over ...
1
vote
2answers
74 views

Because of a reason vs for a reason

When people say "Everything happens for a reason" it sounds like that "reason" is in the future. Is my interpretation wrong? If not, how do I clearly state that "Everything happens due to cause and ...
1
vote
0answers
52 views

where did the phrase “I'll get back to you” originate?

Can't find any info on the origin of the idiom or phrase "I'll get back to you on that".
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Leave someone out. Discard somebody out. What is wrong with this sentence can someone help

In a demo session a demo students said the sentence. Sometimes you just have to discard somebody out. I didn't know how to fix it but I know he meant sometimes you have to leave somebody out. But how ...
1
vote
0answers
94 views

What is the meaning when someone say “it doesn't get much weird than Lynda?”

Lynda made a dance performance, it's very weird and many audiences couldn't understand it. Then a guy made a comment "It doesn't get much weird than Lynda?". What does he mean ? Is that "Lynda is ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

What exactly does the phrase “moral authority” mean? [closed]

What exactly does the phrase "moral authority" mean? I googled it, but each website kind of has it own definition. Since there are many definitions, what is the phrase most commonly used for?
1
vote
1answer
43 views

you are vs you're (informal speech)

In some common phrases like, "You are what you eat", "Your actions reflect who you are". Is there a reason (besides it sounds funny) to not use, "You're what you eat", "Your actions reflect who you'...
5
votes
2answers
73 views

quote/phrase for “more likely to use something if it is right there”

I am looking for a saying/quote/phrase that says that people are more likely to use something if it is right there and ready for use than if they need to put in effort to do so. A simple example ...
0
votes
1answer
104 views

What does “a time that never was” mean?

Please explain what "a time that never was" means. The context: She glanced to the three who stood to one side of the King's throne, looking as though they'd stepped out of paintings from a time ...
0
votes
2answers
336 views

Early usage, you can take the boy out of the country

Regarding the common English form, You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy... (Meaning - "This boy remains a bucolic rube even though he moved from ...
5
votes
1answer
450 views

Salting the battlefield

The British spy thriller series, The Worricker Trilogy, consists of three films: Page Eight, Turks & Caicos, and Salting the battlefield. What is the meaning of the last title? I tried looking in ...
0
votes
1answer
53 views

Is there a word or phrase which means “leads you into other or further research?” [duplicate]

I'm specifically looking for a word that means "leads into more research or further examination". I was thinking that the word heuristic could mean this, but I'm not sure. Does anyone know a word a ...
0
votes
3answers
77 views

common phrases for a right idea but poor execution [closed]

What is a relevant phrase for a "right idea but poor execution" because all I can come up with is promised so much ,but delivered so little. I just need something more precise and appealing than that.
1
vote
2answers
74 views

integer vs integers [closed]

What a wonderful community this is! My question relates to the below question I translated from a non-English Maths question for high school Maths. Did I word the question correctly? I'm not sure if ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Can you say “don't tell me” in a monologue?

"Don't tell me" is often used in dialogues, for example "Don't tell me you're tired already!". But can you use it in a monologue? Let's say you have a character in a movie just talking to themselves. ...
0
votes
2answers
62 views

Is “put it in picture” a phrase?

I don't know if I'm going crazy or confusing this phrase for another, but in my head something like: Let me put it in picture for you Is a phrase that equates to Let me explain it to you/Let ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Alternative to “Overreaching her mandate” for non-elected people

The way I see it, 'overreaching his mandate' is used when someone elected to a position or answering to someone else does things that are 'out of line' (negative connotation) for him. There is an ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

What does the phrase “low conversion from large exposure” mean?

This is the sentrence from the text about email and displaying advirtising. What does the phrase "low conversion from large exposure" mean? This is the nature of advertising, of course; about ...
12
votes
11answers
676 views

Phrase or idiom for someone that is overspecialized

If I have a friend that spreads their interests too thin, gathering a large body of superficial knowledge related to many topics, I'd probably use the phrase "jack of all trades, master of none" to ...
0
votes
0answers
66 views

What does “to cut a look at someone” mean?

Please explain what "to cut a look at someone" means? Example: Jack's mother nodded and cut a look at Jack. Thank you!
1
vote
0answers
64 views

History of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' [closed]

Anyone know the history of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' I imagine it comes from the wording 'Political Wonk' which I've heard of in the past but I'm not sure if it's a positive expression, neutral, ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

'Functional [something]': using an object intended for one purpose in a nontraditional or unforeseen way [closed]

Many years ago someone used the term "functional _______" (the blank being a placeholder for the second word of the term, which I can't remember) to denote the skill of being able to envision using an ...
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Upwards vs up to [closed]

I'm wondering what the difference between upwards and up to is. For example, "This tree can grow upwards of 10 ft tall" vs "This tree can grow up to 10 ft tall". To me they seem to say the same thing, ...
0
votes
2answers
100 views

What is the equivalent to “wise guy” in British English? [closed]

How would I say "wise guy" (as in gangster/mafia speak) if I was in London, England? Wise guy is a very american phrase, so what would be the Equivalent in Britain london??
0
votes
1answer
700 views

Does it sound good to write “With best compliments from” in an invitation? [closed]

Again it's somewhat similar to my previous question, but I need to know it too. I am preparing contents for a wedding card, I have little doubt in writing With best compliments from as the last line ...
1
vote
3answers
236 views

Is it correct to write “Awaiting to welcome you” in invitation? [closed]

I am preparing contents for a wedding card, I have little doubt in writing Awaiting to welcome you as the last line of the invitation. Is it okay to write it? or will you please tell me a good line ...
0
votes
2answers
79 views

Order of placing Mr. and Mrs. in a wedding card [closed]

I am designing a wedding card, I need to know how to start it, these are some samples: Mrs. & Mr. Xyz invite you.... Mr. & Mrs. Xyz invite you.... Mrs. Abc & Mr. Xyz invite you.... Mr. ...
-3
votes
1answer
77 views

Is “Because my feeling into you” the same as “Because I have feelings for you”? [closed]

I know song lyrics often contain phrases with words is an order different then usual, or with little sense. I'm not a native English speaker, so I ran into this phrase in a song and had some trouble: ...
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Does “there's more to come” require a past tense after it? [closed]

I wrote the following phrase: There's more to come once this pull request get merged (a pull request is something that can be merged) I saw on various places people using There's more to come ...
2
votes
1answer
115 views

Word or words to describe type of garments relating to football strips?

I am looking for a word or phrase for use in filtering football strips in an on-line store that describe both of the following. A word or couple of words to distinguish between home/away/third ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

What is it called when using 'you' in place of anyone or yourself in example? [closed]

What is the adjective (or phrase) describing the use of 'you' in place of anyone, everyone, or yourself in passing? Such as the following - ...and you wouldn't dare to eat the last cookie, ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Usage of “credence” [closed]

Is it appropriate to say "gain credence from the audience"? Do "give credence to a theory" and "lend credence to a theory" both work?
0
votes
0answers
126 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
1
vote
3answers
113 views

What is the difference between “comprehensive” and “complete”?

I thought these two words mean the same thing, until I read the following sentence: "Comprehensive, complete and mature C++ frameworks that save lots of work and help bringing the product to market ...
0
votes
1answer
150 views

Not yet here or Not here yet? [duplicate]

I would like to know which one is correct, "She is not yet here." or "She is not here yet." Or are they both correct?
0
votes
4answers
84 views

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting. Like at a party, where my interlocutor is noticeably scanning the room for more ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Australian English for items that are discounted, on sale, or on clearance?

US English user looking for help with AusE. How would you describe to a friend something you bought that was on sale, discounted, or on clearance? Would it be with those terms, or variations on those ...
0
votes
1answer
69 views

meaning of “As if I don't have enough to worry about”

As if I don't have enough to worry about without my youngest making up such things. I understand this meaning: without my children making problems, I have nothing to worry about. am I right?
2
votes
2answers
205 views

Is “painstakingly slow” correct when used to mean “painfully slow”?

I have found 122,000+ usages of "painstakingly slow" on Google, and most of the usages seem to mean "painfully slow" (extremely slow, annoyingly slow). The US English Oxford dictionary says that ...
4
votes
2answers
398 views

“Can I have a question?”

Is this phrase used at all by native speakers? After almost 20 years of studying and speaking English, I've been told this is a phrase that almost every Czech speaker gets wrong - it seems that even ...