A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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38 views

what does hard copy subscription mean?

I want to know what does "hard copy subscription" mean ? full sentence : where payment is primarily for physical goods or services (e.g., buying movie tickets, or buying a publication where the price ...
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2answers
313 views
+100

From Avocadoes to Asparagus, from kangaroos to koalas

What is the name of this literary saying? People use this figure of speech in order to express a wide coverage or variety of a certain class, such as vegetable species available in a market for ...
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1answer
42 views

My Apologies usage [closed]

When you write a letter, and mention the phrase my apologies. How is this phrase used in a sentence.
7
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3answers
532 views

Is there a term for a product having the same name as its place of origin?

Several trade products, especially food, have been named after their places of origin throughout the centuries. To mention just a few, champagne, after Champagne, France. calico, after Calicut, ...
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1answer
45 views

“Solutions offered” or “offered solutions”? [closed]

Which of these two is more grammatically correct? Defining customer needs and advising on solutions offered. Defining customer needs and advising on offered solutions.
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2answers
73 views

Synonyms for 'right in the'

What are some synonyms for right in the/at the? e.g. Get milk right at your doorstep. Watch movies right in your tablet. Or, alternatively, what are some synonyms for "itself"? e.g. ...
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0answers
12 views

Is “communicate through writing” correct? [duplicate]

If they communicate primarily through writing on social networks, teenagers can lose the feeling of real friendship.
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1answer
28 views

Connotation of 'after which'

I would like to learn whether or not there is any connotation held by the phrase 'after which' when used to start a sentence. I recently read 'The Hundred-Year-Old Man Who Climbed Out of The Window ...
1
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1answer
33 views

“Dance it out” or “dance it off”? [closed]

If the one wanted to, for example, dance to forget about problems/to unload, should we colloquially say 'dance it off' or 'dance it out'?
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1answer
57 views

“…words had been too many…”

Example: His words had been too many to fit into a notecard. (I'm using had been instead of were because it's a past-tense narrative. And the person is already dead.) What puzzles me is that ...
7
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1answer
173 views

Is there a phrase, word or saying when one 'has the thought or feeling of causing hurt of mischief" despite never dreaming of acting on it?

For example I was assisting my sister in photographing a wedding. We were taking pictures as the bride was getting ready and I noticed a ketchup bottle on the kitchen table and the following popped in ...
14
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3answers
2k views

Is there a word or phrase for a nursing mother not biologically related to the baby she breastfeeds?

Nowadays he have human milk banks. In the olden days, however, it was not unusual to see a woman nurse the child of another mother who couldn't produce her own milk. Is there a word or phrase for a ...
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1answer
50 views

Meaning of this sentence?

Consider the sentence below: During this hour, I will refuse nothing to the soul that makes a request of me. In this hour, you can obtain everything for yourself and for the others for the asking. ...
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4answers
160 views

“This type of element” or “This type of elements”

I hope this question is not too basic. I recently edited a question and was accused of correcting a phrase that was grammatically correct to a phrase that is now wrong. The context is: I have ...
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4answers
304 views

Is there a word for someone who is not aware of how pretty or handsome he/she is? [closed]

Is there a word or an idiom that describes someone who is beautiful but unaware of it?
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2answers
46 views

Saying the date as a phrase

It has been strongly suggested to me today that the following phrase .... 'Sunday the 24th of May' is incorrect and it should be 'Sunday the 24th May'. Both are very understandable so it probably ...
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5answers
138 views

Is there a specific term for when you get offended by a criticism which wasn't meant for you?

For example, person A says something not directed towards anyone in particular, but it was a criticism nonetheless, and it was intentionally meant to indirectly tell off some people. Person B takes ...
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1answer
40 views

Word for an additional period of time allowed for something

I don't know what word, idiom or phrase to use if I want to say "I want to be allowed to use some specific offers for additional period of time." For example I am allowed to use software for one month ...
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2answers
79 views

Synonym for “worse” with no negative connotation

Say there are two records in a band's discography and neither of them is bad. What's a better term than "worse" to refer to one record not being as great as the other record? Since both records are ...
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8answers
3k views

When is an event so old that the phrase “the other day” no longer applies?

I went to the dentist half a year ago, but when I mentioned that to my girlfriend, I said that I went there "the other day." She said that events which happened such a long time ago definitely did not ...
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2answers
78 views

“another … than” is a correct usage?

There is a document basically written in English, but sometimes written in other languages exceptionally. In that case, to identify the document not written in English, (a document) written in ...
4
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4answers
793 views

Is there a word for lying on the bed peacefully, all your muscles relaxed?

Is there a word or an idiom for lying on the bed peacefully and happy? Throwing yourself down on bed arms wide open, all your muscles relaxed and staring at the ceiling with a happy smile like ...
2
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1answer
104 views

How to phrase a request so “no” means “yes”, and vice versa

How can I phrase a request so an answer of "no" actually accepts the request, and "yes" declines the request?
2
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2answers
39 views

Short phrase to convey “but consider the source”

Is there a short phrase (one to three words), Latin or otherwise, that conveys "but consider the source"? For example, "I heard that pigs fly on television (your phrase here)." I'm thinking perhaps ...
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3answers
83 views

What is the hand gesture called when you knock down your opponent in a fight?

Is there a word or an idiom for the hand gesture, done after finishing a task successfully or after knocking down the opponent in a fight? The one like wiping off the dust from your hands, which ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the difference (if any) between common interests and interests in common?

Is there any difference between "common interests" and "interests in common"? One can certainly ask: "Do you have any interests in common?" Can you also ask: "Do you, guys, have any ...
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1answer
67 views

How to describe an amount of data in the introduction

I'm writing a thesis, mostly about computer science (cloud computing, mostly). In the introduction I'd like to give the reader a vague idea about how much data we are talking about (4.5 TB if I ...
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4answers
90 views

How to shorten “Helping People with Disabilities Live at Home” to 40 characters [closed]

I'm looking for a shorter way to state the phrase "Helping People with Disabilities Live at Home", it's 45 characters, which is too long for a Facebook tagline.
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1answer
76 views

How is the phrase “if not for…” used at the end of a sentence? [duplicate]

His works were brilliant in their understandability -- if not their wordiness. How would you structure a sentence if you wanted to say, that the understandability was brilliant but if you don't ...
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0answers
48 views

How is the phrase “if not for…” used at the end of a sentence? [closed]

Example: His works were brilliant in their understandability -- if not their wordiness.
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2answers
76 views

What is the opposite of “in name only”?

I want to describe a player who is not officially the captain of a team but shoulders as much responsibility. I have read the phrase in name only being used when a person holds a title, but doesn't ...
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1answer
46 views

Who uses the term Hail the King?

Looking for information on who or what time in history the phrase "Hail the King" was used, not hail to the king. When this phrase was said it was followed by what sounds like a foot stomping on the ...
1
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1answer
56 views

Which is correct: “I feel tempted to” or “I have the temptation to” [closed]

While asking a question earlier, this issue sprung into my mind. I immediately decided to use the phrase "having the temptation to", but later decided to correct it to "feeling the temptation to". So ...
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1answer
45 views

“What are our numbers?”

How can I correctly ask a question like "What are our numbers?" meaning what are the number of people in the audience in comparison with number of people in some other audience.
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3answers
82 views

How to say a person is a star of something or some activity? [closed]

How can we call a person who has excelled in some event, a sort of a star in it?
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2answers
78 views

Phrases like “Fifth Beatle” or “Fourth estate”

Is there a term for phrases like Fifth Beatle when there's four main Beatles, fourth estate when there were originally only three estates, or Mongolia's Third neighbor policy when it only has two ...
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7answers
65 views

synonym for someone who is a “fraud” or “liar”

He portrayed himself to be a really straightforward, hardworking person that always keeps their word, always shows up and is on time when they make plans, but turned out to be completely the opposite ...
7
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2answers
238 views

Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?

I see many of my compatriots use the phrase "Next to that" at the start of a sentence to mean "Additionally", "Moreover", "Furthermore" or "In addition". The reason for this, I feel, may be that the ...
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2answers
34 views

What is the difference between the two phrases to meet you and meeting you? [closed]

Why the below one is correct? I look forward to meeting you. And why this one is wrong? I look forward to meet you. I generally do these mistakes in letter writing.
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1answer
49 views

What are the adverb for shabby and hardy? [closed]

What are the adverbs for shabby and hardy are, and what are their corresponding noun and adjective?
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1answer
35 views

Do phrases “Yes, it did not.” and “No, it did not.” have different meanings? [duplicate]

Let say the question is: So this ended up not working? What is the proper way to say, this indeed not work? These two seem fine to me: Yes, it did not. or No, it did not. Are they ...
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2answers
85 views

What is the origin of the phrase “got the hump”? [closed]

depressed, in a bad mood but I am wondering did it come from camels?
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4answers
367 views

The Road Warrior

In modern business speak one increasingly sees the phrase "Road Warrior" used to refer to people who spend a lot of their time travelling for work. Looking at it independentaly this seems a bit of an ...
2
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3answers
465 views

Should I use “and anyway” or “and by the way” in the following case?

It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And anyway, why is he so sure about it? He's not an astronomer." It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And by the way, why is ...
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0answers
44 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
1
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1answer
56 views

“One from another” or “from one another”?

Suppose I have a collection of objects (more than two). I wanted to write "They are at a certain distance one from another". Someone pointed out I should write "They are at a certain distance from ...
34
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13answers
6k views

Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?

Is there a word or an idiom for rich people who spend only their families' money and do not bother to work, just fool around?
1
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1answer
59 views

To make it clear + question (or to be sure, to make sure)

"To make it clear", "To be sure", "To make sure" + Question I'm wondering if I can use some of them like this?: To make clear, what is the most important requirement for the project? To be sure, ...
0
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2answers
79 views

alternate phrase for 'satisfying the thirst'? [closed]

I am trying to compose a poetry. There is a line which goes like this - 'you are like a river that'll satisfy the the thirst of the sea/ocean ' . I want to know if there are alternative phrases for ...
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2answers
61 views

antonym of “to register with”

What is the antonym of the phrase to register with? I'm not looking for the antonym of to register itself (that's to deregister) but for the correct dependent preposition. For example: to register ...