A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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38 views

Deal-killing surprise? [closed]

Origin : Communicate company’s positions completely and accurately to the Customer to avoid deal-killing surprises once Legal is engaged to support negotiations. Q: what does "deal-killing" mean?
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2answers
131 views

Honestly speaking [closed]

I have recently come across the phrase "honestly speaking". I'm not sure if this is correct in terms of English grammar.
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1answer
40 views

The colloquial expression “Here/There I was thinking”

While I was writing the following text, I wondered how the two slightly different expressions "here I was" and "there I was" might be nuanced in meaning. Also, is it more common to have the word "and" ...
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1answer
40 views

touching others’ lives or touching other lives? [closed]

Which of these is correct/more appropriate: touching others’ lives OR touching other lives
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1answer
45 views

Meaning of “tended, if anything, to undercook food”

I am reading the novel by Kate Atkinson, Life after Life, and I am unable to understand the following sentence. Could someone help me? Before Mrs. Glover's advent there had been a woman called ...
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1answer
59 views

What words can be paired with “wreak”?

I can think only of havoc. What other things can be wrought in the present tense?
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1answer
69 views

Duah vs. Dua? Which one is right? [closed]

For the phrase, "Yeah, duah [dua]," which spelling is correct? In this case "duah," means "obviously."
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3answers
82 views

Phrase for “a strong reason for wanting something to happen …”

I have a problem with a phrase that can describe the following: a strong reason for wanting something to happen because you will get advantage from it. I need the phrase for a formal essay. ...
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5answers
1k views

What does the phrase “What's your bag?” mean?

What does the phrase "What's your bag?" mean in the following 2 sentences: I tweeted to the Yahoo help center, and they replied: - Hey man, what's your bag? At a party, someone asked me: ...
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1answer
71 views

“Move on” vs “Move ahead” [closed]

What is the meaning of following phrase? It is ok. We will need to move on. What is meaning of following phrase? it is fine, we can move ahead. What is difference between both of them?
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0answers
65 views

Obscure sentence

I'd like to know if the following sentence is grammatically correct: Deep perineal pouch is related above to perineal membrane. I'd like to know what is the correct meaning the sentence implies ...
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0answers
33 views

Is “metonymically imply” redundant?

Is "metonymically imply" redundant in this sentence: The poet shows this distance from the divine by identifying the stomach and womb as definitive traits of the human condition; these organs ...
2
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1answer
73 views

The Cask of Amontillado by Edgar Allen Poe

What is the meaning of the following phrase from "The Cask of Amontillado" By Edgar Allan Poe? A wrong is unredressed when retribution overtakes its redresser. It is equally unredressed when the ...
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1answer
41 views

“His life had been set on a different course” or “His life was set on a different course”?

I want to say "His life has been set on a different course since then." but push it into the past. I can come up with two options: His life had been set on a different course since then. His life ...
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2answers
63 views

Is there any difference between “from the beginning” and “in the beginning”?

I am not sure if this is correct. I feel that from the beginning implies something that lasts until now, while in the beginning implies something that only existed at the beginning. Please correct me ...
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1answer
47 views

Is the fixed phrase “belong WITH something” still in use? [closed]

As I was reading a myth, I bumped into a sentence like The creature does not belong with mankind I am not sure if it is still possible to use this expression. Has it not been replaced totally ...
6
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3answers
471 views

What does the phrase “You don't say” represent?

In an English movie, Marianne and Bob were talking to each other: Marianne: "Joy went to Jordan last week to search for religious sites." Bob: "You don't say?" My question is: What does ...
15
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19answers
2k views

Word/Idiom/Phrase to describe a stage in a project's life-cycle when you are stuck and thus no progress is happening?

Sometimes while working on a project, we get stuck. We run into a problem which we are not able to solve despite of trying for some time (a few days or weeks). Sometimes we don't even know what is ...
3
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1answer
481 views

Eating inside the restaurant

We all know that if we want to eat outside the restaurant we say "take away", but what about if you want to eat inside? Do you say to the cashier "eating here"? Is there a common phrase ?
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2answers
50 views

Is “looking into potentially… ” a redundant statement?

Is "looking into potentially.... " a redundant statement? Ex: We are looking into potentially moving our development from one source to another.
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1answer
57 views

Is it okay to use “to have a picture of something” when you mean having an idea and a qualitative understanding of sth?

I want to use "to have a picture of ..." in a sentence like this: to have a picture of this process we applied some theory to the system ... Which by "to have a picture" i mean to have a ...
3
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1answer
124 views

What is the accurate English translation/meaning of the phrase “In nocte consilium”, the motto of Birkbeck College in London?

Not sure if this is the appropriate place to pose this question, but apparently we don't have a Latin Stackexchange... The motto of Birkbeck College in London is "In nocte consilium". However I have ...
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1answer
50 views

What kinds of phonetic or phonological linguistic gaffes are there? (mondegreens, eggcorns, spoonerisms) [closed]

I was wondering what other sorts of phonetics-based linguistic gaffes there are. I don't mean the typical grammatical or syntactic error. Rather, I mean things like "eggcorns": eggcorn ...
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1answer
39 views

Number of genitive object in a nominal compound [duplicate]

Which of the following options is better? Do the two choices reflect any difference in meaning? "Matters regarding comments deletion" or "Matters regarding comment deletion" --Assuming the ...
2
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1answer
59 views

What does the phrase to have one's clock wiped mean?

Example: "That war has raged, since 1987, 20 years after the Satan got its clocked wiped" It's a quote from a facebook post. What was intended is most probably "got its clock wiped" and it is merely ...
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2answers
31 views

“..to hearing from you and getting inspired..”

Is the following sentence correct english? "We are looking forward to hearing from you and getting inspired by your photos" It might just be that english is my second language, but the "getting" in ...
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1answer
46 views

Meaning of “___ does not pretend to speak for everyone”

"The committee does not pretend to speak for every member of the association" What are some of the meanings behind the sentence above? Is this sentence used to suggest that the committee works hard ...
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2answers
17 views

How to say “the game demands a high-characteristic device”?

I want to highlight for users that a certain game demands devices with high resources. Could you please tell me how would native speakers say it? Doesn't my variant in the title sound weird?
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1answer
317 views

What is the origin of the phrase “War never changes”

All the games of the Fallout franchise start their intro with the phrase War. War never changes... I was wondering if this was an original phrase or was it from literature or some speech?
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2answers
60 views

“Satanist lies” or “lies satanist”?

Context There is this page on Facebook which is created to make all sorts of incredibly complex anagrams, 101 Anagrammi Zen. On that page, I recently commented on the anagram "Alanis Morissette ---> ...
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2answers
57 views

Which one is more appropriate, “many a time” or “many a times”? [duplicate]

I used to think that phrases starting with 'many a ' were notionally plural but singular in usage. So, which one is more appropriate here?
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3answers
99 views

What is the word for trying to do someone else's job, to get them fired eventually?

I have been searching a lot for this, but can't find the expression. I'm wondering if there is a phrase that is used a lot for this. At work, it happens a lot in many organizations that people try to ...
0
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1answer
69 views

What term describes “the degree to which peers can loan each other money”?

I want to make a distinction between two groups of people: Group A has the liquidity and borrowing power. Group B has minimal liquidity and borrowing power. The term "credit rating" implies it's ...
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2answers
45 views

How to describe a request that I'd prefer to avoid

Hello dear linguistics, I am looking for a short phrase, a word if you may, that will describe the following: A request that I can fulfill but I am reluctant to as it involves some actions that I ...
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1answer
40 views

Is it correct to use “All season product” to indicate a product can be used in every season of the year?

Assuming an hypothetical product, would it be correct to use an description such as "Thermo-adaptable 500 thread all season linen" to describe it? A small sentence indicating that the product was ...
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1answer
44 views

Why is the use of “as effective as” wrong here? [closed]

From the SAT: Not many authors have described the effects of environmental pollution as effective as Rachael Carson, whose work is still a model for nature writers. It said that as effective as ...
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2answers
29 views

“means of” vs “mean of” [closed]

When you use "means of" as a way to say a method eg. means of identification, do you always use means and not mean? Or does it depend on the subject? I have googled it but am still not sure.
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1answer
46 views

A word or idiom to describe an abusive parent who wants to keep their child

I just finished watching the video game Among the Sleep and at the end At the beginning of the game, the mother seems to cling onto the child possibly in memory of the little boy's father. At the ...
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3answers
240 views

Another way to say “to become a better person”

When I'm asked the generic question, "why do you do community service?" I usually respond by saying "because it makes me a better person," or "because doing community service allows me to develop ...
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19answers
6k views

Phrase to describe a moving goal that is forever just out of reach

Ironically, the phrase I am trying to recall is just out of reach, so perhaps someone can help me with a phrase that describes a moving goal that is forever just out of reach. I will try to provide ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Is “during the middle of” proper English?

In this question on the Movies & TV Stack Exchange the question starts with the following observation: Actor Philip Seymour Hoffman, who portrayed a character in The Hunger Games, passed ...
2
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3answers
79 views

Main verb in a sentence and gerund

In the sentence "Offering her license and registration, Selena sobbed in the driver's seat," offering is not a gerund, right? It isn't a noun and does not act as a subject. That made me wonder if the ...
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1answer
50 views

Is the word “like” wrong?

Here is my example (from an SAT question): Like his other cookbooks, in his new book Chef Louis offers lengthy explanations of what he considers to be basic cooking principles. The error was ...
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1answer
57 views

Rephrase the Sentence [closed]

I have a picture that I am trying to give a caption to. Following is what I have come up with, but it just not sounding right. It's picture of San Francisco downtown in the background and bay in the ...
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1answer
37 views

Presentation in pair - handing over

We will have small conference at our university and it is going to be held in English. I will speak there together with my colleague and it seems like I am going first and let him continue in the half ...
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2answers
55 views

Part of speech of “that” [closed]

In the phrase: He demonstrated that he was true What word class does that belong to? In general, which word classes can it belong to? For example, relative pronoun, determiner, ... THX
3
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2answers
354 views

Was “the dark side” used a long time ago in a country far far away?

In the series Breathless, someone made a remark about "the dark side" (joining it, or something). The series was set in the 1960s England, before the first movie in the franchise Star Wars was ...
1
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1answer
54 views

Is the “beauty of design” a good phrase?

I was writing some words in my portfolio website. But I felt confused about this. In the time when I was coding my website, I've made several UI things. However, only after I entering this field, ...
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0answers
33 views

how to use ' in love with' correctly?

I know that it usually describes romantic and sexual attraction. But can you say 'I'm in love with him' about your friend whom you love platonically? Is it appropriate?
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2answers
35 views

Is “not actual” in “potential, not actual harm” an adjective phrase or an adverbial phrase?

I think this affects comma placement, right? If it's an adjective phrase modifying harm, then I think it would be: "potential, not actual harm" If it's an adverb phrase modifying potential (by ...