A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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5
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2answers
63 views

quote/phrase for “more likely to use something if it is right there”

I am looking for a saying/quote/phrase that says that people are more likely to use something if it is right there and ready for use than if they need to put in effort to do so. A simple example ...
0
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1answer
63 views

What does “a time that never was” mean?

Please explain what "a time that never was" means. The context: She glanced to the three who stood to one side of the King's throne, looking as though they'd stepped out of paintings from a time ...
0
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2answers
190 views

Early usage, you can take the boy out of the country

Regarding the common English form, You can take the boy out of the country, but you can't take the country out of the boy... (Meaning - "This boy remains a bucolic rube even though he moved from ...
5
votes
1answer
220 views

Salting the battlefield

The British spy thriller series, The Worricker Trilogy, consists of three films: Page Eight, Turks & Caicos, and Salting the battlefield. What is the meaning of the last title? I tried looking in ...
0
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1answer
49 views

Is there a word or phrase which means “leads you into other or further research?” [duplicate]

I'm specifically looking for a word that means "leads into more research or further examination". I was thinking that the word heuristic could mean this, but I'm not sure. Does anyone know a word a ...
0
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3answers
64 views

common phrases for a right idea but poor execution [closed]

What is a relevant phrase for a "right idea but poor execution" because all I can come up with is promised so much ,but delivered so little. I just need something more precise and appealing than that. ...
1
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2answers
73 views

integer vs integers [closed]

What a wonderful community this is! My question relates to the below question I translated from a non-English Maths question for high school Maths. Did I word the question correctly? I'm not sure if ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Can you say “don't tell me” in a monologue?

"Don't tell me" is often used in dialogues, for example "Don't tell me you're tired already!". But can you use it in a monologue? Let's say you have a character in a movie just talking to themselves. ...
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2answers
53 views

Is “put it in picture” a phrase?

I don't know if I'm going crazy or confusing this phrase for another, but in my head something like: Let me put it in picture for you Is a phrase that equates to Let me explain it to you/Let ...
1
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2answers
43 views

Alternative to “Overreaching her mandate” for non-elected people

The way I see it, 'overreaching his mandate' is used when someone elected to a position or answering to someone else does things that are 'out of line' (negative connotation) for him. There is an ...
0
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1answer
28 views

What does the phrase “low conversion from large exposure” mean?

This is the sentrence from the text about email and displaying advirtising. What does the phrase "low conversion from large exposure" mean? This is the nature of advertising, of course; about ...
12
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11answers
645 views

Phrase or idiom for someone that is overspecialized

If I have a friend that spreads their interests too thin, gathering a large body of superficial knowledge related to many topics, I'd probably use the phrase "jack of all trades, master of none" to ...
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0answers
50 views

What does “to cut a look at someone” mean?

Please explain what "to cut a look at someone" means? Example: Jack's mother nodded and cut a look at Jack. Thank you!
1
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0answers
58 views

History of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' [closed]

Anyone know the history of the expression 'Liberal Wonk' I imagine it comes from the wording 'Political Wonk' which I've heard of in the past but I'm not sure if it's a positive expression, neutral, ...
1
vote
2answers
68 views

'Functional [something]': using an object intended for one purpose in a nontraditional or unforeseen way [closed]

Many years ago someone used the term "functional _______" (the blank being a placeholder for the second word of the term, which I can't remember) to denote the skill of being able to envision using an ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

Upwards vs up to [closed]

I'm wondering what the difference between upwards and up to is. For example, "This tree can grow upwards of 10 ft tall" vs "This tree can grow up to 10 ft tall". To me they seem to say the same thing, ...
0
votes
2answers
89 views

What is the equivalent to “wise guy” in British English? [closed]

How would I say "wise guy" (as in gangster/mafia speak) if I was in London, England? Wise guy is a very american phrase, so what would be the Equivalent in Britain london??
0
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1answer
195 views

Does it sound good to write “With best compliments from” in an invitation? [closed]

Again it's somewhat similar to my previous question, but I need to know it too. I am preparing contents for a wedding card, I have little doubt in writing With best compliments from as the last line ...
1
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3answers
128 views

Is it correct to write “Awaiting to welcome you” in invitation? [closed]

I am preparing contents for a wedding card, I have little doubt in writing Awaiting to welcome you as the last line of the invitation. Is it okay to write it? or will you please tell me a good line ...
0
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2answers
59 views

Order of placing Mr. and Mrs. in a wedding card [closed]

I am designing a wedding card, I need to know how to start it, these are some samples: Mrs. & Mr. Xyz invite you.... Mr. & Mrs. Xyz invite you.... Mrs. Abc & Mr. Xyz invite you.... Mr. ...
-3
votes
1answer
67 views

Is “Because my feeling into you” the same as “Because I have feelings for you”? [closed]

I know song lyrics often contain phrases with words is an order different then usual, or with little sense. I'm not a native English speaker, so I ran into this phrase in a song and had some trouble: ...
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Does “there's more to come” require a past tense after it? [closed]

I wrote the following phrase: There's more to come once this pull request get merged (a pull request is something that can be merged) I saw on various places people using There's more to come ...
2
votes
1answer
112 views

Word or words to describe type of garments relating to football strips?

I am looking for a word or phrase for use in filtering football strips in an on-line store that describe both of the following. A word or couple of words to distinguish between home/away/third ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

What is it called when using 'you' in place of anyone or yourself in example? [closed]

What is the adjective (or phrase) describing the use of 'you' in place of anyone, everyone, or yourself in passing? Such as the following - ...and you wouldn't dare to eat the last cookie, ...
1
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1answer
35 views

Usage of “credence” [closed]

Is it appropriate to say "gain credence from the audience"? Do "give credence to a theory" and "lend credence to a theory" both work?
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0answers
69 views

Is the phrase “out of home” meaning “not at home” correct?

I've run across this phrase "someone is out of home most of the day" meaning "they are not home most of the day" several times. Is it correct and common way of saying "I'm not home often"? Example: ...
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2answers
54 views

What is the difference between “comprehensive” and “complete”?

I thought these two words mean the same thing, until I read the following sentence: "Comprehensive, complete and mature C++ frameworks that save lots of work and help bringing the product to market ...
0
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1answer
84 views

Not yet here or Not here yet? [duplicate]

I would like to know which one is correct, "She is not yet here." or "She is not here yet." Or are they both correct?
0
votes
4answers
72 views

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting

Word or phrase for someone who talks with another person, but obviously looking around for someone more interesting. Like at a party, where my interlocutor is noticeably scanning the room for more ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Australian English for items that are discounted, on sale, or on clearance?

US English user looking for help with AusE. How would you describe to a friend something you bought that was on sale, discounted, or on clearance? Would it be with those terms, or variations on those ...
0
votes
1answer
57 views

meaning of “As if I don't have enough to worry about”

As if I don't have enough to worry about without my youngest making up such things. I understand this meaning: without my children making problems, I have nothing to worry about. am I ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Is “painstakingly slow” correct when used to mean “painfully slow”?

I have found 122,000+ usages of "painstakingly slow" on Google, and most of the usages seem to mean "painfully slow" (extremely slow, annoyingly slow). The US English Oxford dictionary says that ...
4
votes
2answers
146 views

“Can I have a question?”

Is this phrase used at all by native speakers? After almost 20 years of studying and speaking English, I've been told this is a phrase that almost every Czech speaker gets wrong - it seems that even ...
0
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3answers
42 views

Alternative phrase for “to linger on (an issue)”

I want lay out several arguments about the same issue. I am looking for an alternative phrase for "to linger on (an issue)", to use it in a context similar to this, in order to introduce my ...
1
vote
2answers
60 views

“If, however in advance one has knowledge…” vs “However, if in advance one has knowledge…”

I am trying to write a paper and and I am not sure of the correct phrasing of a particular sentence. Here is what I am currently using If, however, in advance one has knowledge of the material ...
0
votes
2answers
183 views

'Why you did that' and 'Why did you do that' difference [duplicate]

I asked one person 'Why you did that' referring to something he did in the past, and he responded something like 'Why are you saying that, are you a little kid?'. I was confused and asked him why ...
4
votes
6answers
166 views

Goodbye forever

Is there any word in English that you should use when you want to say : "goodbye" for a person and both of you know that you'll never see again? "Farewell" ? or Something else?
-3
votes
1answer
87 views

What does “to score drugs” mean? [closed]

What does it mean "to score drugs"? What can I use this phrase for?
7
votes
6answers
2k views

Would 'sitting in a queue' be incorrect English?

Usually, to avoid any ambiguities, I'd say 'waiting in the queue', however I came across 'sitting in a queue' and wanted to know whether it's correct or incorrect English. Is it used? And if yes, in ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Term that describes an incomplete comparison

What is the term for a dichotomous statement like, "The two side of the issue are the fish should be protected, or it should not." That is, the other side of the issue is not fully explained, it's ...
3
votes
3answers
63 views

Making experience unreal [closed]

How would one say make a situation feel less real? I'm referring to the situation when people create illusory world of theirs to shelter themselves from reality;
4
votes
3answers
119 views

Let's get started! or let's get going?

I'd like to know if anyone feels a difference between "Let's get started!" and "Let's get going!". Both seem to mean about the same. It is also interesting to notice that there seems to be an ...
3
votes
3answers
89 views

word for that time of the month where funds are running low and you gotta wait til payday [closed]

Basically title, but is the meaning of the Indonesian phrase "tanggal Tua". Any ideas?
2
votes
1answer
53 views

Can an infinitive phrase be equivocal in its function in a sentence?

I have found the following sentence as an example of an infinitive phrase used as an adjective, however, it seems to me that it could also be taken as an adverb of purpose. Jane bought a radio to ...
3
votes
4answers
77 views

Meaningless Choice [duplicate]

What's a name for a meaningless choice? A choice that has no effect on outcome. Something similar to a phrase like "pyrrhic victory".
1
vote
0answers
45 views

“lmfaoooooooo”, “nooooooo” and other elongated words [closed]

Is there are phrase for elongating a word based off a less formal way of speaking (or would speak for colloquialisms like lmfao)? examples: noooooooo -> no yeaaaaaahhhh -> yeah loooooool ...
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Is the word 'get' correctly replacing more and more words in English?

Would it be safe to say that using the word get (or phrases containing it) to replace existing but longer words is now fashionable and acceptable? With already about 50 meanings, it is replacing ...
0
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2answers
71 views

Anyone can help me to understand the meaning of “pass tax”?

Anyone can help me to understand the meaning of "pass tax"? For example: The adjective retroactive refers to something happening now that affects the past. For example, a retroactive tax is one ...
1
vote
4answers
340 views

Did “white” in “decent white folk” originally refer to race?

Nowadays, the "white" in "decent white folk" can refer to race. But did it always refer to race, or did it have another meaning? I tried looking at Google NGrams, but it has very few hits.
2
votes
2answers
56 views

Phrase for taking ones own medicine [closed]

Is there a word or phrase that describes someone who cannot take what they verbally dish out or criticise.