A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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is the phrase “available with me” correct? [closed]

I used a bus in which the hostess said that the company magazine is available with me on demand. Is the usage of available along with with correct?
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3answers
72 views

How do you express high proficiency in a succinct way?

I heard the following phrase in movies: -- Do you know how to use A? -- I am a f****g surgeon with A I like it a lot, but I can imagine a lot of people will not understand the meaning. I ...
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1answer
31 views

Expression of “relationship”

hi,if i want to describe“ the relationship between A and B as well as the relationship between A and C”.(A, B, C are things) can i say “the relationship of A to B and C”? Or “the relationship of A to ...
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6answers
557 views

“Have some reason you” or “Have some reason why you”

Can the "why" be removed from the phrase "have some reason why you?" Example: Do you have some reason you ____? vs. Do you have some reason why you ____? Are these both grammatically ...
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3answers
395 views

Origin of phrase “pulling for you”

When somebody is going through a difficult life situation, people will commonly say, "We're pulling for you." Where did this term come from? It sounds rather strange!
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4answers
4k views

origin of phrase 'stone the crows'

Just as the title says — where, and how, did the phrase 'stone the crows' originate?
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4answers
23k views
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65 views

A formal synonym/expression for “saying that”

I need a more formal expression for "saying that" here. My supervisor told me it is informal English, but I couldn't find another formal expression Saying that rape culture is an environment ...
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1answer
55 views

Is there a word or phrase for knowing what to say but not how to say it?

As kind of a real-life example, I'm struggling to write a description of the Crusades from the point of view of a Catholic pope. I know that through the Crusades, the Christians basically "rescued" ...
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0answers
62 views

Is using a sentence as a subject grammatically correct?

For example: Attack them directly won't do anything "Attack them directly" is a partial sentence. In this sentence, we treat that whole phrase as a subject and make a sentence from the phrase. ...
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59 views

I'll be curious

Just wondering if it is correct to say "I'll be curious to". For example, I used the sentence "I'll be curious to read them [the text messages] later". Do I actually mean to say "I am curious to read ...
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5answers
4k views

Is ‘Set one’s hair on fire’ a popular English idiom?

Yesterday’s (September8) New York Times carried an article titled ‘Setting Their Hair on Fire’ which was written by economist, Paul Krugman. It is followed by the following sentence: “First things ...
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1answer
46 views

Alternatives to 'In The Pink'? [closed]

I'm looking for alternatives to 'in the pink'.
2
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1answer
193 views

What is the origin of the phrase “Never Put a Hat on a Bed”?

I came across the phrase "never put a hat on a bed" while playing Google Feud. It was the top result for "Never put a _______". I looked it up, and found out that there's a superstition that says that ...
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1answer
36 views
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40 views

What does “The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures.” mean?

The following sentence is from the "The Algorithm Manual" book The young graduate student was bright and eager, but green to the power of data structures. What does the green to the power of ...
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1answer
67 views

Word or term for propaganda associating truth with crazy people

The corporate media often write pieces about people who are deemed crazy, then proceed to ridicule things these people say or believe, which typically include some very sensible things. For example, ...
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2answers
374 views

“In the figure below” or “in the below figure”?

I frequently encounter this in technical documents and I am wondering which one is correct. In the figure below or In the below figure
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5answers
10k views

“anymore” vs. “any more”

any more requests anymore requests Are these two the same? It seems that "any more requests" is grammatically correct while "anymore requests" is not. Am I right? Why are they different?
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2answers
631 views

Is half of an amount stated as 50% less or 100% less? [closed]

I've struggled with this concept and have generally interpreted it one way for all of my life, which leads me to believe people are incorrect when they state the other form. And honestly I'm not ...
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2answers
97 views

“Robust” as a noun

Can an adjective "robust" be a noun in a sentence? And if it can't how would you say with one word "robust fellow" that can be applied to both man and woman? Because as I understand "robust fellow", ...
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6answers
9k views

Can “your reputation precedes you” be used as a negative statement?

I have always considered "your reputation precedes you" as a gesture of complement and respect. However it occurred to me if it is possible to use it for a notorious person with a bad reputation? ...
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0answers
43 views

Concise Way to Say “Small Tasks can be as Important as Big Tasks”

I need a concise way to explain this idea: Doing the small and easy tasks can be as noble (or more worthwhile) than doing the hard tasks. Examples: 100 people can be more effective by ...
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7answers
3k views

I need another phrase for “as expected” or “it would follow”?

I am writing a technical paper where I have described an experiment resulting in "x". Then I go on to describe the result of a second experiment whose result was expected since the reason was deduced ...
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1answer
1k views

Envy is the biggest tribute

The best football (soccer) coach in the world for the past 12 years said: Envy is the biggest tribute that the shadows do to the man. Where does the phrase come from?
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1answer
79 views

Idiom or phrase to denote unfair use of someone who is nice

I am looking for an idiom or a phrase to denote the situation where someone is unfairly taken advantage of (Ex: Gets a lot of work dumped on his lap on a Friday evening like Harold in Harold and Kumar ...
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3answers
72 views

A word or phrase for someone who is dull and unaware of it

Is there a good word or phrase for to describe someone is generally dull, but believes themselves to be exciting and is unaware that talking to them is laborious?
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2answers
133 views

“Choose a password [that is] at least 6 characters long” - should I include “that is”?

I am not a native English speaker. But I would like to know if the following sentence is correct? "Choose a password at least 6 characters long." Or should it be something like "Choose a password ...
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2answers
47 views

Does “One in ten” require hyphens

In the sentence "one in ten people hate..." which is the correct way to refer to 1/10: "One in ten" or "One-in-ten" I'm not too sure if the hyphens are entirely necessary here. I have however seen ...
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1answer
51 views

What is the meaning of “rake in the bucks”?

I've read the phrase in a post by Joel Spolsky: You should be starting to get some ideas about how to break the chicken and egg problem: provide a backwards compatibility mode which either ...
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0answers
62 views

A word or phrase for a non-military attack on a country's home soil

Consider this definition of asymmetric warfare: Asymmetric warfare is war between belligerents whose relative military power differs significantly, or whose strategy or tactics differ ...
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5answers
4k views

Does 'mailbox money' mean anything?

My friend and I heard someone on the phone say the phrase 'mailbox money'. The sentence was 'mailbox money is always nice' My friend told me that 'mailbox money' means money/checks that you keep ...
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6answers
4k views

How can I understand “thirty-seconds of a dollar”?

I read the following sentence in the book Options, Futures, and Other Derivatives: Treasury bond prices in the United States are quoted in dollars and thirty-seconds of a dollar. Here is my ...
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0answers
28 views

Phrase for a specific point

Is there a more point-specific way to say "As a preliminary point,". For example, if I want to talk about the contents of a piece of agreement but I wish to point out on the outset that it is not ...
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2answers
96 views

Why are ambiguous phrases like “ain't no something” still used? [duplicate]

There are some phrases in English that lead to nothing but unnecessary confusion and frustration, especially for non-native speakers. For instance, I've seen the phrase ain't no something being used ...
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1answer
60 views

What does the phrase 'much the most" mean?

Is it really a phrase? I found it in Tom Sawyer - "...and the most hospitable and much the most lavish in the matter of festivities that St Petersburg could boast..."
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2answers
67 views

Is it grammatically correct to combine 2 phrases into 1 sentence?

Is this sentence acceptable or correct "You're welcome, have a nice day ahead." ?
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2answers
5k views

What does “in spades” mean? [closed]

What does "in spades" mean, for example in the following sentence: demand and love are both there in spades ... I guess "in spades" means "on cards" or "on the table" or exist?
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19 views

“What can be the reason” vs “What could be the reason” [duplicate]

Can "Can" and "Could" be used interchangeably here in the sentences? What can be the reason? What could be the reason?
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0answers
79 views

“With this going on” and “got a lot going on”

Here's a fragment of "Rocky Balboa - Inspirational Speech": With this going on, it's gonna be worse than ever. - It don't have to be. - Sure it does. -Why? You got a lot goin' on, kid. And ...
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1answer
81 views

What's the phrase that is used with 'honest' to indicate sarcasm that I am being monitored [closed]

What's it that is used with 'honest' to indicate sarcasm that I am being monitored. .
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2answers
121 views

How would I punctuate the phrase “making that which needs to be better better”? Is this phrase grammatically correct?

How would I punctuate the phrase "making that which needs to be better better"? I'm guessing that the phrase is grammatically correct, and that the punctuation is as follows, along with an example ...
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3answers
1k views

What does ‘Move the bar on somebody’ mean?

According to Maureen Dawd’s article titled “Field of Dashed Dream’ appearing on August 16 New York Times, President Obama took a strong verbal punch on the chin from a woman supporter at a town hall ...
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4answers
534 views

What does “pass over somebody for the nod” mean?

I heard AP Radio News reporting Republican presidential candidate, Newt Gingrich won the endorsement of New Hampshire’s largest newspaper, which can reset the going of presidential race. The news was ...
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1k views
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6k views

Is “I feel like a piece of meat” popular phrase? Isn’t it embarrassing for women to use this phrase?

I found the phrase ‘I felt like a piece of meat’ (at a meeting),’ in the article of Washington Post (September 20) titled ‘In early Obama White House, female staffers felt frozen out.’ The article ...
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3answers
3k views

What does “stand to attention for somebody” mean?

I encountered this phrase in Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Esben_and_the_witch His brothers did not stand to attention for Sir Red...
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0answers
50 views

What's the meaning of “we couldn't shake it”

I've heard this phrase in a song, but I don't think its meaning lies in terms to get rid off something. I'll never forget you Although at times we couldn't shake it
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2answers
111 views

“What happened to ____?” versus “What happened _____?”

I seem to remember my parents, who came from Dublin, Ireland, saying a phrase like "what happened it" or "what happened him" rather than "happened to it" or "happened to him". But it might have been ...
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1answer
40 views

“We proceed to a further generalization…” removing stuffy language from a technical paper [closed]

I am a math major, but sometimes I read the stuffy language in these papers and I really crack up. The worst part is, when I start writing I do exactly the same thing. Certain phrases used over and ...