A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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1answer
45 views

A was persuaded away from B

What's the meaning of a phrase “A was persuaded away from B” here? Thirty years later, George Miller, the Australian director of the original trilogy, was persuaded away from films about ...
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2answers
39 views

What is the difference between the two phrases to meet you and meeting you? [closed]

Why is this correct? I look forward to meeting you. And why is this one wrong? I look forward to meet you. I often make these mistakes when writing letters.
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0answers
18 views

“dollar rebounds biggest falls”

I found the sentence like the following: Dollar rebounds biggest falls Does this sentence make any sense? I guess it should instead be: Dollar rebounds after its biggest falls
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1answer
30 views

Verb and noun usage

Since all nouns can be used as verbs so can all the verbs be used as nouns ? Another query : Is there any sentence possible without a verb ?
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1answer
38 views

(the?) day after tomorrow

It seems to me that when used as a noun, 'day after tomorrow' is preferred with 'the.' 'The day after tomorrow is the deadline.' But when used adverbially it is not so-prefaced.' 'I'll see you the ...
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2answers
307 views

“That strikes one for me”…what's it mean?

What's the "one" mean here? Is this taken from baseball? Can the idiom be grammatically used in other persons besides the first?
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1answer
99 views

What is meaning of idiom “I COULDN'T BE BETTER”? [closed]

I have seen people using this idioms while texting when i ask how are you they reply i couldn't be better so i want to know its meaning and which others idioms and words which i can use against this ...
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2answers
31 views

Is there a word or phrase to define several words linked by hyphens, such as in “a sit-back-and-wait-for-it attitude”

some more examples: "And she gave me that aren't-I-just-gorgeous smile." "The I-did-it-my-way approach." "A from-this-day-forward-I-have-no-son scene."
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1answer
103 views

How to describe an amount of data in the introduction

I'm writing a thesis, mostly about computer science (cloud computing, mostly). In the introduction I'd like to give the reader a vague idea about how much data we are talking about (4.5 TB if I ...
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0answers
81 views

Words that act as both noun and verb

Can all the verbs act as noun and vice versa ?
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6answers
2k views

Is “Trees are the right height” an established phrase? What does it mean?

Many newspapers reported that Mitt Romney praised his home state, Michigan in front of 1,200 supporters on Friday afternoon, by saying: "What a thrill it is to come back to Michigan, particularly ...
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1answer
27 views

Do harbour cranes lay dormant?

I am trying to construct 'alternate text' for a photograph I am submitting for evaluation. The photo is in the 'cityscape' category and depicts the harbour at dawn with cranes that are normally busy - ...
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1answer
52 views

Phrase indicating recruiters should not offer services in response to a job opening

In Dutch, there's a specific phrase / idiom you can use when posting a job opening to indicate that it's not appreciated if recruitment agencies offer to find a candidate for you ("Acquisitie naar ...
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1answer
63 views

Is it appropriate to say “I've never been” when referring to a place, omitting the adverb “there” from the phrase?

I have been hearing the phrase "I've never been" with increasing frequency lately when referring to places (i.e., "I'd like to go to the Apollo. I've never been" as opposed to "I've never been ...
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2answers
80 views

Is “this object remains a valid inclusion in a discussion of similar objects” grammatically correct?

The wider context within which I am writing this phrase is: What is certain, however, is that early twentieth-century piano rolls, while not themselves audio recordings, remain a valid inclusion ...
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1answer
50 views

Can you interpret “Waltz for Venus” differently?

I think you can have two interpretations for this. One being, a dance or music. Two being, accomplish something with little to no effort. Are these two interpretations correct or is it just the former ...
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0answers
38 views

Difference between “In Conclusion…” and “By way of conclusion…”

I just found a post asking about the difference between "In conclusion" and "By way of conclusion." I was pretty sure that I had a sense of the difference, but I couldn't see how my understanding of ...
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2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “in conclusion” and “by way of conclusion”?

"In conclusion" is common, while "by way of conclusion" is quite formal. But what does "by way of conclusion" truly mean that differs from "in conclusion"?
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1answer
76 views

what does “got takes on” mean? [closed]

I've read this phrase in an aritcle about 2016 Oscar prediction. The original passage is as follow. "Same goes for which of the annual slew of big name biopics will be the 2016 answer to "The Theory ...
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2answers
98 views

From Soup to Nuts

I know that the phrase means "from one end to the other". Though I know many dinners that start with a soup, I know none that end with nuts. Hence the question - where does this phrase originate?
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2answers
61 views

Can a comma be used to REPLACE a subordinating conjunction?

I am aware that the formulas for complex sentences are ID and D,I (I=independent and D=dependent), but I have a sentence that has an I and D but adding a subordinate conjunction sounds weird. "He woke ...
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1answer
46 views

is “over the past years” a natural sounding expression?

I have heard "over the past few years" or "over past years", but I just read a document that said "X, Y and Z have been beneficial over the past years". This strikes me as wrong, but I found the ...
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1answer
32 views

Client compliance, client's compliance or a client's compliance?

I'm working on a job application covering note and I'm really struggling with one particular phrase. Here's the full sentence: "I possess strong analytical and investigative skills as demonstrated by ...
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11answers
136k views

Which is correct: “drive safe” or “drive safely”?

When someone is going to drive their car somewhere, I always used to say "drive safely" to them. Recently I was told I should say "drive safe." (From: Would you ask someone to drive safe or to ...
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1answer
51 views

what does “hold off” mean [closed]

I updated my colleague about a travel subscription confirmation. And he said "Great News! Hold off on arranging travel until I hear from Bill today." I got the point - Dont arrange any travel. But I ...
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1answer
51 views

What does “let's fold that in” mean?

One of my colleagues replied with a suggestion in the group email. I agreed with his suggestion. The other colleague in the group responded "perfect - lets fold that in Andy."
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2answers
66 views

Word to describe when, where or how privacy is kept, trust is maintained, and integrity matters

Here is a list of scenarios on why honest people would need privacy and anonymity. My marketing research tells me that the word "anonymity" is too closely related to hacking, and "privacy" reminds ...
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5answers
721 views

phrase for being prepared for a potential challenge

There is a phrase in Malay that goes "prepare an umbrella before the rain", meaning one must be prudent and proactive of future challenges by making all the preparations necessary. I would like the ...
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2answers
69 views

What is the origin of “Here's How!”?

I own an antique store and found a canapé plate of a bar scene and two gentlemen toasting. The words under the scene are "Here's How!" What is the country of origin? This plate is dated 1933 from a ...
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5answers
8k views

When is a person called a “lightning rod”?

I am aware of the lightning rod used to protect buildings and structures. But, what does it mean to refer to a person as a lightning rod? Also, when is it appropriate to use and when should it be ...
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1answer
63 views

Is this particular statement a phrase or a clause?

The difference between clauses and phrases has been extensively discussed (here, here, and likely elsewhere). And as Dusty has said, “The short answer [is that] clauses contain a subject and its verb, ...
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2answers
58 views

Word for “Writing phrase on something”

Is there a word that represents the act of writing a phrase on something? In this case, I'm trying to advertise a club by "engraving" or "inking" ping pong balls with a phrase such as "Join this ...
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1answer
55 views

Where one finds phrases such as “imbued with ambivalence”?

Where one finds phrases such as "imbued with ambivalence"? From Source, some other phrases : "having many commonalities emanating from their histories", "issues had a significant interplay on (her) ...
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1answer
37 views

“We are familiar” improvement [closed]

I have this,"We are familiar with the sport activities", sentence but to me it's a bit awkward and I need to improve it a little bit. I need to improve "We are familiar" part, and I am kind of stuck ...
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130 views

Do we append consonants when linking words?

How should in an instant be spoken? [ɪ nə nɪn.stənt] [ɪn nən nɪn.stənt] If we use second version, then we append [n] before [ən] and before [n.stənt]. How do I correctly link words together when ...
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3answers
103 views

Usage of can vs may [duplicate]

It is said that can and may both are used as a sense of possibility. If that’s the case, then what is the difference between: It can be very dangerous to cycle at night. It may be very dangerous ...
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3answers
2k views

What does the phrase “in my puff” mean?

I'm reading "Right Ho, Jeeves" by P.G. Wodehouse and I've just encountered another phrase which I can't understand. Full sentence where this phrase is used (emphasis added by me): In fact, not to ...
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2answers
46 views

Is “cut and come again” understood outside Australia?

Although I haven't read the Australian children's book "The Magic Pudding", I'm familiar with the phrase "cut and come again" being used in it. Is the phrase understood outside of Australia?
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2answers
5k views

What is the origin of the phrase “Never Put a Hat on a Bed”?

I came across the phrase "never put a hat on a bed" while playing Google Feud. It was the top result for "Never put a _______". I looked it up, and found out that there's a superstition that says that ...
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5answers
11k views

What does “suck it up and go” mean?

I came across the phrase, “suck it up and go” in the columnist’s answer to a question from a reader of Carolyn Hax's column in Washington Post’s “Lifestyle” section (July 2nd). The Q&A titled ...
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1answer
38 views

'In the ranks' OR 'With the ranks'

Which of the following two phrases is correct? I'd put him right there in the ranks of the best anthropologists out there. OR I'd put him right there with the ranks of the best ...
0
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2answers
59 views

Term for referring to someone with mediocre words to describe their greatness

What is the term for describing the following sort of phrases used to humoristically, and almost affectionately, describe someone who is obviously well known to be superb in their field? Referring ...
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1answer
53 views

“Preventing them to wrap” vs “Preventing them from wrapping”

I've found on StackOverflow an old answer written by me, in which I've used the first form. Reading it now, it sounds weird and wrong; I am inclined to think that the second form is the only one ...
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27answers
4k views

Common phrase for something that changes while you are working on it

What is a common phrase to describe something that changes while you are working on it without your being aware of it. For example: you are adding comments to a document, and when you submit them you ...
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6answers
6k views

“They know not of what they speak.”

Is this phrase wrong? Shouldn't it be, they know naught of what they speak?
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2answers
77 views

What about a sentence.like …I like going to “new” places with “old” friends---

What can we call the above I ENJOY GOING TO "NEW" PLACES WITH "OLD" FRIENDS and can you think of other examples?
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2answers
53 views

Pence in the pound

I have received correspondence that includes the sentence: The buyer (or debt collection agency) will offer you pence in the pound irrespective of how I reply. What does "Pence in the pound" ...
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5answers
328 views

What does “people of the concrete steppes” mean?

I read this on an economics blog (http://econlog.econlib.org/archives/2014/02/in_the_1930s_it.html) and tried to google it, but the results seem to just be people using it, no one explaining it. ...
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4answers
90 views

When should hyphens be used to make text clearer

In an earlier post - Phonetic understanding of tongue twisters - a comment was made that "hyphens ...(are) ...not needed in speech, so they must be extraneous". The phrase prompting this assertion ...
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14answers
7k views

Appropriate word for internet name of a person

What is the appropriate word or phrase which means the internet name of a person. I mean the nickname that a person uses in almost all places on the internet like blog, IRC, forums, mailing lists etc. ...