A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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2
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6answers
448 views

What is the difference between'time is up' and 'time is over'

Are the two phrases'time is up' and 'time is over' used in different contexts or can be used to convey the same meaning
0
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1answer
134 views

Hope this helps [closed]

I was reply to a email that my office colleague sent just want to know a good reply to phrase "Hope this helps"
5
votes
3answers
7k views

Original Meaning of Blood is thicker than water, is it real?

I recently read that the phrase "Blood is thicker than water" originally derived from the phrase "the blood of the covenant is thicker than the water of the womb", implying that the ordinary meaning ...
0
votes
1answer
80 views

“I've been looking to do [this or that].” Is “looking to do” idiomatic?

Pretty much that's the question. I wanna think that I have heard it used many times ("I've been looking to do that for the longest time"), but now I'm not sure. Thanks!
1
vote
3answers
340 views

“Died in an accident” or “killed in an accident”?

When speaking of someone who lost their life as a result of accidental circumstances are the two phrases below interchangeable? He was killed in an accident.   She died in an accident. ...
3
votes
3answers
64 views

guests young and old vs. young and old guests

I came across the following sentence in an American newspaper. "Guests young and old ended up loving the fun socks they were given at the party." Does it make any difference if they say "young and ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Correct expression for “time of the day” greetings?

What is the correct description of good morning/good evening/good afternoon, etc? Are they called greetings of the day, or time of the day greetings? If not, what are they called?
10
votes
8answers
22k views

What does “a man among men” mean?

The phrase: "A man among men." We have been having a debate about whether this means: unexceptional, common, like all others, ordinary a superior example of one in a class We have found examples ...
2
votes
3answers
61 views

Usage of “there follows”

I wonder if it is correct to say: From A there follows B if you want to say that A entails B (or B is a consequence of A).
0
votes
3answers
56 views

Do “getting into…” and “getting interested in…” mean the same?

How did you get into it? How did you get interested in it? Do the examples above mean the same?
18
votes
4answers
3k views

What does it mean to be “mortally wounded”?

The only source I could find for a definition of this phrase was Wikipedia, which states a mortal wound "leads directly to the death of the victim. Death need not be instantaneous, but follows soon ...
9
votes
8answers
13k views

What does “I know, right?” mean?

Not only is my seventh grader using this phrase, but her teachers are as well. I suppose it means I totally agree with you and you totally agree with me but it sounds like there is a subtle Is that ...
2
votes
5answers
97 views

A word that represents a group of people working to achieve a common goal or dream

I am working on a project that involves bringing people together who share common goals or dreams. Is there a word or phrase to describe groups of people who are working together to accomplish these ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How to compare between two incomparable things, yet similar in some aspects?

I want to compare between results seen in healthy cells and in tumor cells. The same finding was seen in both types of cells. I know that this is not like apples-to-apples comparison, but still both ...
0
votes
1answer
33 views

“a change in …” vs “a change to …”, any difference? [closed]

Is there any difference between "a change in something" and "a change to something"? Is that like the former one is a more objective description while the latter one emphasizes the result of a ...
12
votes
8answers
12k views

What is the origin of the phrase “cut the mustard”?

What is the origin of the phrase "cut the mustard"?
2
votes
3answers
153 views

When someone says, “I do not feel that good”, what does that mean?

I have heard it many times in movies and shows. I think it means "I do not feel very good" or "I do not feel as good as you think", but why do we use "that" here, and is it correct?
1
vote
4answers
118 views

Any other way of saying “I share your opinion”?

"I divide your position" is the first that came to my mind, but I think it's definitely incorrect. Is there any phrase like this with "position", not "opinion"?
10
votes
8answers
1k views

Is there an idiom that corresponds to the Hungarian expression “fall off the other side of the horse”?

There's a Hungarian phrase that can be literally translated as something like "fall off the other side of the horse". (The literal implication is either that instead of falling off this side of the ...
-1
votes
1answer
43 views

What does “With a team” mean? [closed]

Does the phrase "with a team" imply that the speaker is on the team, or rather that the speaker is explicitly not on the team (of course it may also be ambiguous)?
-1
votes
1answer
62 views

What does 'Lets himself be swept along like a log of wood by a current.' mean?

I read the following quote by Gandhi when he was describing the actions of a moral man: Source How can a man understand morality who does not use his own intelligence and power of thought, but ...
13
votes
3answers
5k views

Origin and exact meaning of “taken to the cleaners”

I know the meaning of this phrase by context, but the German analogs are no literal translations of this phrase and very dissimilar metaphors, meaning roughly: being tricked into something being ...
0
votes
2answers
52 views

Is this sentence proper grammar? [closed]

Is this sentence using proper grammar? - "The money was and is not a loan."
3
votes
3answers
99 views

A phrase that captures the concept of making oneself falsely appear to be guilty for purpose of discrediting another party

Perhaps this is more of a trope, but I'm looking for a phrase or word in English that describes the situation where: (a) "Party A" consciously performs actions that establish a false expectation of ...
0
votes
2answers
61 views

How to express the trend in this graph using the appropriate phrases?

I have this graph and I want to describe the difference in the take off trajectory of two patterns in the figure below. The first pattern is seen in the first two parameters over the years from the ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Rules for hyphens in words and phrases

What are general rules for when hyphens are used in words such as "bad-ass" or "well-deserved". Could someone explain what kinds of words/phrases those are?
-1
votes
1answer
51 views

What is the difference about two sentences below?

What is the difference about two sentences below? 1.Despite a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called "new age" treatment. 2.Despite being a very old medical therapy, acupuncture is called ...
5
votes
3answers
5k views

Origin of “Well, well, well. What do we have here?”

Google will not tell me where this phrase originates. Does Stack Exchange have the answer?
0
votes
3answers
80 views

What is the opposite of 'a false dawn'

What is the opposite of a false dawn, a false dawn being "a promising situation which comes to nothing". The sentence I'm thinking of would be something like: They started off well and it was not a ...
0
votes
0answers
42 views

What does “getting out of love” mean?

I don't really grasp it. Is that a correct and common term? From the song Shangri-la: Sitting here, waiting for, Someone calling at my door, Too bad, I'm getting out of love. ...
-1
votes
2answers
78 views

High level saying of the sentence “I don't just work for timepass”

Basically, I want to tell my superiors that whatever work I perform, I do it to the fullest and I do it efficiently. So I want to express the sentence: I dont work forcibly and for time pass. I ...
0
votes
3answers
65 views

Usage of Phrase 'Hit the Bricks'

Can we use the phrase 'Hit the bricks' at the context of asking people to work hard?
23
votes
32answers
6k views

Alternative ways to say “I cannot answer that question”? [closed]

I'm getting bored of repeating the same "I can't answer that" phrase over and over. I'm trying other phrases, like "I'll leave that to your imagination," but that one sounds too weird. Specifically, ...
4
votes
4answers
629 views

What does “thanks for sharing” mean?

Many people say "thanks for sharing" and seem to mean something positive and meaningful by it. However, it seems to also have a cold and even sarcastic connotation to it, e.g.: "I got married ...
-4
votes
2answers
68 views

Is this quote derogatory toward women? What does it mean? [closed]

What does it mean that " all soldiers stand at attention" when referring to a woman entering a room? Someone told a woman this.
8
votes
4answers
5k views

What is the correct name for posts made on twitter?

Well, I honestly tried to search for this but I drowned in twit* and tweet* results. Should I write: "my tweet" or "my twit"? "I am tweetting" or "I am twitting" ("to twit" vs. "to tweet")? ...
2
votes
5answers
122 views

Someone sociable who prefers quiet environment when outside

Someone I know who is fairly sociable, prefers unbusy (ie no crowd) environments when they're outside. They prefer to go, say shopping in late hours, in order to avoid other shoppers. Or they prefer ...
1
vote
3answers
61 views

What's the best way to say: “Brands who trust our work”

What's the best way to say: "Brands who trust our work" or "Brands that trust in our work"?
4
votes
4answers
2k views

Where and when did “Bucket List” come to mean what it does today?

I'm not sure I had even heard the term "bucket list" until the movie came out. I get the feeling though that the term long predates the movie. Can anyone identify how "bucket list" came to mean what ...
5
votes
5answers
851 views

Is there another way of saying “less is more”?

Is there another way of saying “less is more" in the following context? They changed their packaging and left only the essential branding on it. It epitomizes "less is more".
1
vote
2answers
72 views

On your six and watch your six

I recently learned following phrases. On your six It means directly behind you. This is a military designation of location where 12:00 is directly in front of you. Watch your six It means to watch ...
2
votes
5answers
79 views

Single word for “at one's wits' end”

While there often appears to be a word that could replace an idiom or a phrase in meaning, this one seems to be an exception (for me that is). I've tried: Confused : Less powerful, isn't it? ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

When will you be in through? What is the meaning of this question? [closed]

I could not figure out the meaning of this question. Could someone explain me briefly? This statement was in "answering audience questions" which is a presentation guide line.
3
votes
4answers
3k views

“Adverbial phrase” vs “Adverbial clause”

Please tell me what the difference is between an adverbial phrase and an adverbial clause.
0
votes
2answers
20 views

Put in the shoes of [closed]

Please guide me on whether the used phrase is right. I put myself in the shoes of the customer before preparing the requirement. Thanks & Regards, Murali.
6
votes
3answers
1k views

Why does “go spare” mean “get angry”?

I don't know whether the phrase "go spare" is used in the US, but it is very common in the UK. e.g. You're an hour late. Mum's going spare upstairs! I would like to know where the phrase comes ...
2
votes
5answers
218 views

What is the best word to describe an “object of importance” without inquiring about its past? (i.e. not memento)

I'm looking for a word to describe a gift. The way I am using this word is to describe the item in way that a person who receives this gift would almost worship it because it means so much. The words ...
1
vote
1answer
72 views

Are “go on”; “go for it”; “Carry on” and “go ahead” synonymous?

I saw “Carry on” vs. “go ahead” A friend of mine said this to me, and it sounded kind weird for me... If you know a better way "go on" I would say If you know a better way "go for it" Are ...
0
votes
1answer
197 views

“Carry on” vs. “go ahead”

I am confused about whether it is okay to say, "Ok, carry on/go ahead with your job then." Any help on this simple issue is highly appreciated.
1
vote
2answers
76 views

“Brought Forward” and “Pushed back”

During a conversation with a colleague about the time I had received an automated email, I noted that it had arrived 20 minutes late. I then checked the email schedule software and said: The ...