A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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4
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2answers
689 views

Awkwardness around 'go live' phrase [closed]

Context: software company training documents. We commonly use the phrase "go live" when talking about making a system operational. I'm fine with using it as two separate words, but it becomes awkward ...
2
votes
2answers
6k views

“as and when” Usage

Why would one say " you can do that as and when needed" instead of " you can do that when needed" Is there any difference between them?
-1
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2answers
3k views

Is it correct to use “Please find in the following”?

I'm writing an article. At the beginning of the article, I want to write this quick introduction: We are pleased to share with you our knowledge in the network device managements. Please find in ...
-2
votes
1answer
127 views

Meaning of “in a look of a frame of reference” [closed]

Does "in a look of a frame of reference" mean "regarding to sth."? Sorry, unfortunately I couldn't find a simple example.
1
vote
2answers
203 views

Usage of “as such”

I read that the following is ungrammatical: Because of the accident, he arrived at the dock an hour late. As such, he missed the boat and forfeited his deposit. Why? What is the correct usage ...
2
votes
8answers
21k views

What do you call a person who motivates or inspires?

My choices so far: motivational source inspirational source source of motivation source of inspiration Being a non-native speaker, I don't know which one to use. What I want to say is that ...
-2
votes
1answer
44 views

comes with and side item

I am confused with following phrases, how these two phrases work,please help me. Thank you! Match them with their meanings comes with side item ...
22
votes
9answers
4k views

Is the phrase “I just sucked it out of my thumb” used in American English?

I was born and raised in South Africa. We frequently used the term "to suck out of one's thumb", implying that an answer was just a wild guess or the notion had no evidence but was rather just ...
0
votes
2answers
378 views

Catchy phrase to express or mean “always in stock/no back orders etc” [closed]

I'm looking for a neat phrase to coin the message of 'we're never out of stock of a product' or 'We always ship all of your order, no back orders' etc. Best I can come up with so far myself, is, ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

what does “off-the-shelf” mean? [closed]

I am applying for a job and in my proposal my mentor commented the following. Please explain me what it means. ME: Finally I found something promising. Please have a look Mentor: That's a good find ...
6
votes
1answer
113 views

Etymology of “typeface Weight”

My boss stated that he noticed the word "weight" is used to refer to the boldness of a character, and stated that he felt this was a new occurrence. My gut feeling is that this is an old term, ...
0
votes
2answers
20k views

Which one is correct? “I have work experience in ” or “I had work experience in”? [closed]

Which one is correct? I have previous work experience in IBM in PHP domain during the period 2009-2010. OR I had previous work experience in IBM in PHP domain during the period 2009-2010.
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Etymology of “blackguard rating” in the context of the British Army during the Crimean War

From Wikipedia: I never had such a blackguard rating in all my life – I who have had more than any woman – than from this Barry sitting on his horse, while I was crossing the Hospital Square with ...
1
vote
1answer
244 views

Would you say “wanna” when you want something? [closed]

Would you say "wanna" when you want something? For example, "I wanna a new PC", instead of "I want a new PC"?
0
votes
1answer
5k views

What's the meaning of “what am I to do” [closed]

Is "what am I to do" be commonly used in daily lives? Also what do following sentences imply? What should I do the next? What am I to do the next? Please.
2
votes
1answer
39k views

Is it correct to say “I would like to inquire about something?”

When I make a call to get some information regarding a matter, I generally start the conversation with "Hello, I would like to inquire about something." Is this a correct usage? If not, what would be ...
3
votes
2answers
204 views

Is the phrase “congenital birth defect” redundant?

con-gen-i-tal: (m-w.com) existing at or dating from birth [congenital deafness] acquired during development in the uterus and not through heredity [congenital syphilis] I ran across the phrase ...
0
votes
1answer
864 views

What does 'What kind of mischief are you up to?' mean?

One of my US users asked the following questions when she got information about my resignation from my manager. What is this rumor I hear? What kind of mischief are you up to? I am not sure ...
3
votes
1answer
409 views

“Got Notifications” vs. “Received Notifications”

For some reason the phrase "Got Notifications" seems rough. "Received Notifications" sounds a bit more natural. Is there something wrong with the phrase "Got Notifications"? Is there a principle ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

What “pining and repining” meant in 17th century?

...like in : may be dying or even pining and repining" or "dragging the pining ang repining victim to the grave"?
8
votes
2answers
462 views

Drink 7 to 10 days after opening?

Is this label telling the consumer that it is best to consume the drink 7 to 10 days after opening it? I know what they are getting at, but I feel like it should say "Best if consumed within 7 to ...
1
vote
1answer
906 views

Phrase for “suddenly wake up from a dream”

What is a natural thing to say when you suddenly wake up from a dream? The impression I have in mind is of something like burst/tear apart or escape from the dream scene by waking up.
0
votes
1answer
21k views

“For example” vs. “just to name a few”

How would you explain the differences between using "for example" and "just to name a few" in the following multiple choice: Your smartphone might give you a wake up call, send you emails, help ...
-2
votes
2answers
154 views

How would you concisely express 'the range of dates in which something is expected to happen'?

I need a conside expression for "the range of dates in which someone expects something might happen". For instance, I called John to ask him for a more precise period in which he estimated he ...
0
votes
1answer
149 views

How do you express a natural habit of a species?

I am curious to know about the plural/singular form of addressing a species. For example, which expression is correct or more appropriate: Lion does not eat wolf Lions do not eat wolves Or ...
3
votes
1answer
233 views

“puzzled why” vs “puzzled as to why”

Is "puzzled why" correct as well? Is it just a choice of style? Or is there a difference in meaning? And if so, I'm curious (as to) what that difference is.
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votes
1answer
3k views

What does the phrase “for the heck of it” mean? [closed]

What does the phrase "for the heck of it" mean? For example, I just found this in a book: — I just dusted the dining room for the heck of it! — How thoughtful of you!
3
votes
1answer
179 views

What does “typed-out paralysis” mean exactly?

I found the article titled “A writing coach becomes a listener” in April 28 New York Times ...
1
vote
2answers
390 views

What does ‘Go for a three’ mean in the basketball?

In New Yorker magazine (April 25) titled “A marriage counselor tries to heckle at a Knicks game” ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

To Whom It May Concern, what's the best way to address a group?

I write emails to groups of individuals from time to time, and when I don't/can't address anyone in particular, I will begin the letter with To Whom It May Concern, Is this the best way to ...
0
votes
1answer
176 views

Does “price of delayed order” mean same as “delayed order price”?

Do these two phrases have the same meaning? price of delayed order delayed order price I think they are the same, but I'm not sure. Which is more common and less difficult to understand ...
-3
votes
1answer
107 views

How to Reply That PASSPORT NUMBER is not in my remembrance at the moment [closed]

If somebody called me over phone and asked to give your Passport number / Pan card / Roll number something. If it is not in my remembrance , how can I apologies in best way for this ? NOTE -Please do ...
1
vote
1answer
342 views

About the meaning of “light smattering of applause”

I expected "light smattering of applause" to mean "few applause" because "light" has the meaning of "small, not heavy". However, the phrase seems to mean "a lot of applause" in the context. For ...
1
vote
1answer
17k views

“Would have” and “would have no”

Could you describe about "would have ~ed" & "would have not ~ed". I know would has the several meanings. But when I was talking with one of my friend who is a native speaker and in this following ...
-3
votes
1answer
1k views

“Go ahead and head on over to …”

Although I don't really have evidence for this, it seems to me that the phrase "go ahead and head on over to [...]" prevails more and more over simply "go to [...]". This phenomenon is particularly ...
2
votes
1answer
418 views

Should I say “I make a living by teaching” or “I make a living teaching”? Which one is correct? Is the preposition 'by' necessary?

I am confused about the correct usage of the phrasal verb, 'make a living'. I don't know whether I should add the preposition 'by' at the end of it. I looked up several dictionaries, most of which ...
3
votes
9answers
5k views

Does “Chinese laundry” have any non-literal meaning?

A recent ad by Bing Lee had during its ad something like You could create a Chinese laundry with that much [washing powder]. Mum, you can't say that! Yes I can, I'm Chinese Does ...
0
votes
2answers
426 views

How would you say 'go round the houses' in a formal way?

I am writing a memo (quite formal) and I need to mention that the attitudes in the previous meeting were really offtopic, the team didn't focus on the important matters. Were it informal writing I ...
-1
votes
1answer
126 views

Make a … of himself

A quote by Dr. Johnson goes "He who makes a beast of himself gets rid of the pain of being a man." The phrase "make a beast of himself" appears to have the definition of "to behave like a ...
-1
votes
1answer
188 views

“I may know where it is” vs. “I know where it may be”

I am wondering if the following two sentences have different meanings. I may know where it is. I know where it may be.
7
votes
3answers
76k views

How to use “no pun intended”?

The phrase "no pun intended" is often added after someone made a pun or something that could be considered a pun. If this should be taken literally (i.e. it really was unintentional), then I'm not ...
3
votes
1answer
7k views

“Off on a tangent” vs. “off tangent.”

Tonight I heard someone say, "We're going off tangent here." I take this to be a mistaken conflation of "off on a tangent" with "off track." However, is a shift occurring? Is "off tangent" ...
3
votes
2answers
313 views

Is “to fight with” ambiguous?

I've read about a Dutch volunteer, who died in Syria "fighting with the rebels". Obviously from the context you could understand, that he was fighting for the rebels, against the government troops. ...
2
votes
2answers
518 views

why “and then some” means considerably more?

I've googled the phrase "and then some" and am told that it means "considerably more". But just how to comprehend this? The phrase literally means "some more" -- how does it come to mean "much more"? ...
2
votes
2answers
337 views

What's “Cantor's Sign”?

In David Foster Wallace's The Pale King, in the context of a list of medical ailments reference is made to "Cantor's sign (dextral)" and "Cantor's sign (sinistral)". Does anyone have any idea what ...
0
votes
1answer
206 views

Meaning of “a rage of vision”?

What is the meaning of “had sent him a rage of vision” in this excerpt: The old man was in a position to know what his ideas were. He had lived for three months in the nephew's house on what he ...
0
votes
3answers
197 views

“at all the vertices”, what does this mean?

My professor has written a statement like this: function is non-negative at all the vertices of the structure S and positive at some vertex for a publication. It is a peer-reviewed publication ...
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Is there another way to say 'working on'?

Is there another way to say "We are working on to update our resort."? I do not want to use working on.
3
votes
2answers
590 views

Why do people say “that-a-way” instead of “that way”?

I've often the following: Bob: Have you seen Ian ? Geoff: Yes, he went that-a-way. What is the reason people sometimes jokily add the extra "-a-" into the phrase? Where did this come from? ...
2
votes
0answers
983 views

Use of “any more than” to relate two different situations [closed]

In the following quote by Billy Sunday “Going to church doesn’t make you a Christian any more than going to a garage makes you an automobile.” can anyone pls explain/elaborate the usage and meaning of ...