A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

learn more… | top users | synonyms (1)

1
vote
2answers
38 views

meaning of “is by no means given”

What does "though the latter is by no means given" mean? Does the "latter" refer to "renewal"? Not only do many of these incursions into the cityscape possess a ‘temporary aspect’ in their ...
1
vote
2answers
49 views

Can starting with: “The bottom line is” be considered redundant if the reader can clearly see that's, in fact the bottom line

My questions is, can the expression "the bottom line is" be considered redundant in an example like so: "[A long, detailed text or answer.] The bottom line is, it doesn't really matter." ...
2
votes
3answers
45 views

Is there one words or a better phrase to specify daily need goods [closed]

like something to describe the commodities we use on a regular basis like stationery , coffee mugs bags, etc.
0
votes
1answer
36 views

“You are presented a” / “You are being presented a”

I need to employ a similar phrase in an essay but I am not too sure whether this even exists. I think I read it a couple of times in tech blogs but I am not sure if these articles have been written by ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

Using adjectives with 'All the more' [duplicate]

I'm trying to complete this dialogue but I've encountered a bit of trouble with the usage of 'all the more'. The dialogue is below. Our bond is based on trust. We have no contract. Trust? Then ...
0
votes
2answers
23 views

To condition the entry on

I'm looking for the most natural way of saying that someone will agree to something if their demands are met and I'm not sure if each of these phrasings would sound grammatical and natural for the ...
0
votes
4answers
63 views

What can be a single word for a “valuable learning experience”.?

I am looking for a word or two that elegantly expresses the idea that the projects I did were a valuable learning experience. Here's the sentence: While I was doing my bachelor's I was a part of some ...
1
vote
0answers
21 views

“effective and efficient estimation” or “accurate and efficient estimation”?

In math, we always need to derive some methods and strategies to estimate an unknown thing. For a good method, first it should get an estimation that is as accurate as possible, and second it should ...
-1
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the definition of “another few years” [closed]

As in the phrase "I don't plan to retire for another few years"
-1
votes
0answers
30 views

How to say that while performing your job duties you interact with other people in English only?

Odd question, but I just can't google anything on that matter. A friend of mine is writing a CV (she is not a native English speaker). In a CV she wants to say, that while she performs her job duties ...
11
votes
11answers
2k views

How do I say that I am interested in a lot of things without coming off either as superficial or arrogant

For example: I like Math but also love History and am pretty good at sports. This is for my Statement of Purpose.
1
vote
2answers
56 views

What's the meaning of phrase “for fun and profit”?

What's the meaning of phrase “for fun and profit”? Previous question only ask about origin, not meaning, and I cannot find it in dictionary: http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/fun+and+profit
0
votes
1answer
37 views

sticked to vs stuck at vs glued to [closed]

I'm not a native English speaker, so to me these three phrases sound ok: This system consists of NFC codes sticked to the tables. This system consists of NFC codes stuck at the tables. This system ...
2
votes
1answer
107 views

What is another phrase for one stop shop?

I am writing a small description and need a phrase to highlight a range of services. Is there another phrase for "one stop shop" which is both catchy and apt?
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Use of a participial phrase in titles

I was making an essay about cystic fibrosis and I stumbled upon a problem regarding the title. I was wondering whether the title I made was grammatical. It was "Cytosis Fibrosis: A Hereditary ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Is 'I don't know' an adjective? [closed]

Other than being an interjection, does 'I don't know' serve as an adjective?
0
votes
0answers
16 views

meaning of “a game of tease”

what does it mean when someone compares something or some act to "a game of tease"? I think it means like indulging in a game of seek and hide or something like that. Am I right? it is like a game ...
0
votes
2answers
37 views

What does the sentence, “You could do worse than review some of Lenny Bruce's material.” mean

I understand that it's an indirect form of compliment, also known as litotes. Here's a question already on that, "You could do worse than [x]" I couldn't get my head around, if it's a ...
5
votes
3answers
77 views

Looking for a single word or phrase

is there a single word or phrase in English that describes a simple grip children and adults use – to help someone climb up a tree or over a high fence. I mean when you clasp your hands and interlock ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

The usage of “Per se”

Is the usage of the phrase "Per se" correct in this sentence? Sometimes, religion, though not be enaugh per se, may lead to violence.
6
votes
1answer
93 views

What is the act of breaking a pen nib after signing a death sentence called?

I have noticed that every time a judge sentences someone to death sentence, he breaks his pen’s nib after signing his order. So what is this act called? I mean any specific term or single word for ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

“Are you a man or a mouse” phrase origin

Robert Burns associated the fates of mice and men in his poem "To a Mouse" (1785): The best-laid schemes o' mice an' men Gang aft a-gley, But this seems to suggest that mice and men have a ...
3
votes
4answers
80 views

Word describing the one flaw in an otherwise perfect crime, plot or plan

I am wondering if there is a noun or phrase that articulates how a crime, plot or plan was foiled. I am interested in a noun or phrase that relates to crime in particular. For example, They two ...
-1
votes
1answer
52 views

The phrase “supposed to” [closed]

Why does "supposed to" have a different pronunciation in the middle of a sentence and at the end of a sentence? I've been learning about phrases, but I'm still confused about this one. Examples: ...
1
vote
2answers
62 views

Does “the military” refer to any military?

When someone uses the term "the military" is it implied they are talking about the military of the current country they are in, or any military? For example I sometimes see on application forms "Have ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Any difference between pleasure to us to… vs. pleasure of ours to…?

I am writing a super-formal letter (it is a semi-legal text) and I am unsure if there is any sensible difference between writing "It is a great pleasure to us to..." (26,200,000 hits on Google) ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Adjective phrase/clause to describe the object of the sentence

Am I using the adjective phrase correctly in the following sentence? "I want to be someone like you, smart and beautiful." I know that using the adjective phrase to describe the subject of the ...
9
votes
7answers
1k views

Term to describe when one event cannot occur without the other

So my wife and I were just having a conversation concerning a situation at her work, and I was trying to think of a term to describe the GM's approach but it's eluding me. Here's the context: ...
-1
votes
3answers
83 views

How to say “there is plenty of room for improvement.” in a more academic manner? [closed]

My last sentence in an academic assignment reads "Even in ........, there is plenty of room for improvement.", Is there anyway to say the same in a more academic manner? or is it acceptable as it is? ...
-1
votes
3answers
142 views

I think I spider / My English is not the yellow from the egg [closed]

I'm trying to improve my English skills. Can I use the phrase "My English is not the yellow from the egg" or "I think I spider" in an English spoken country?
1
vote
4answers
69 views

Name of ideology where 'thinking of something wrong is actually wrong'

I am thinking of the name of some kind of ideology where in a world where by the mere fact of thinking of doing something that is wrong causes you to actually be in the wrong. e.g. In a ...
1
vote
0answers
51 views

What does “workday innovation” mean? [closed]

Should I understand this as an innovative action undertaken on a working day? Is this phrase grammatically correct?
1
vote
1answer
24 views

Some clause structure about “SOURCE said that CLAUSE”?

Suppose we have the following sentences: John believes that people are good. Steve knows that France is in Europe. Now, in these sentences we have some clause (e.g. People are good, France ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

“Dumped them Ceremoniously”- Is this an oxymoron? In a physical sense, like, dumping a bunch of leaves. Or Flowers? Along those lines

Is the phrase Dumped them Ceremoniously an oxymoron? Is it over the "oxymoron" word limit? I hit upon this phrase when I was trying to write in a humorous vein about someone throwing something, ...
0
votes
0answers
37 views

Different way to say a common phrase

So, I wanted to know, is there some other way to say, "Courtesy of", as in, say I have a dress, which was given me by someone else, say X, then I would say "Courtesy of X". I hope I am able to clarify ...
0
votes
5answers
80 views

“People of different kind” or “People of different kinds”

Which of these clauses are correct? "People of different kind" or "People of different kinds" A sample sentence: This brings up the issue of how well our sample represents people of different ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

Are “rent per day” and “rent per month” correct expressions?

Do determine the type of a suggestion in a real estate catalogue, besides "for sale", we must also denote real estate suggested to be rented on daily basis and on monthly basis. Is "per day" correct? ...
0
votes
2answers
60 views

What is the idiom or proverb or phrase for this “hard packing but loose knot”? [closed]

What is the idiom or proverb or phrase for this "hard packing but loose knot"? For example, you took hard preparation for the exam, but, didn't attend it.
2
votes
1answer
94 views

What is the correct usage: In the morning vs. On the morning? [closed]

In the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team. Or On the morning of 19 April 2016, Taliban militants attacked a security team .
-1
votes
2answers
20 views

to change sentence to not be dismissive [closed]

how to phrase "if there is nothing else" without being dismissive. we want a positive statement that will make the other person respond Tried is there anything else is can assist you with
6
votes
1answer
262 views

What does “My tongue doubles back” mean?

I was reading a novel when I came across this phrase. "My tongue doubles back in my throat as the senses comes back to mind and I choke on the words, "I love you too." What does the "my tongue ...
0
votes
1answer
37 views

Is it correct if I write: the year will be 2033? [closed]

Is the phrase above correct? I am not sure about it. Thank you. It starts with: picture yourself xx years from now: the year will be 2033.
13
votes
8answers
4k views

“It calls itself”

I recently stumbled upon this article and the first paragraph surprised me a bit. It says: Nerima (練馬区 Nerima-ku) is a special ward in Tokyo, Japan. In English, it calls itself Nerima City. ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Best wishes/Good luck …? - [to encourage to proceed trying]

Suppose, someone is working on a long and tedious task (learning English seems not quite fitting, I think, it's too...continuous; I just stumbled upon this question in the context of learning physics ...
4
votes
3answers
142 views

Is there a term for the inability to find a word which is then substituted with a “funnier” word?

Take this sentence: "If people are lost when they start out, they usually just keep getting...loster." — from "Don't Make Me Think" Obviously "loster" isn't a word, but I see this turn ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Cast to vs Cast as

What is the difference between 'cast to' and 'cast as'. For eg. It can be cast to/as an optimization problem as follows. I think that 'cast as' is the correct form, but it sounds odd because of ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Correct Phrase Between “The Art of Fighting” and “The Arts of Fighting”

Are "The Art of Fighting" and "The Arts of Fighting" both correct? If not, which one is accurate?
3
votes
2answers
83 views

Does “taking the heart out of something” mean to defeat it?

Does the idiom "taking the heart out of something" mean to defeat it? Context: rituals of science have taken the heart out of the rituals of religion
0
votes
3answers
130 views

What does “couldn't happen to a better person” mean?

It seems like it should mean "if they were any better of a person, this wouldn't have happened to them" (which is quite negative), but it's always used in a way that implies a meaning of "no person is ...
0
votes
2answers
49 views

Does the phrase “waste breath” always indicate talking in vain? [closed]

everyone, I am wondering if the phrase "waste breath" always indicates wasting time and talking in vain. Let's say a teacher said to his class: Since you do not understand this grammar rule, I'll ...