A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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78 views

What is a “Gutenberg mind”? [closed]

I came across this phrase in yet another novel-is-dead kind of article, where the author refers to literary critics as the "possessors of Gutenberg minds". I was wondering if anyone else has heard ...
2
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2answers
180 views

Optional 'of' in various phrases, especially with 'much/much of'

Yes, I know there is a related question here. But that doesn't answer my question. For each of the following phrases, are they correct? If not, why not? What is the OF doing? What part of speech ...
2
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3answers
162 views

Pretty Please and Similar Phrases

I was wondering who uses 'pretty please?' Is it used mainly by girls? Under what circumstances? Thank you for replying.
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1answer
61 views

Two-part phrases: official term? [duplicate]

In English we have some phrases like: Make like a banana — and split Make like a tree — and leave With these kinds of phrases sometimes the second part is left unsaid; if you say, "make like a ...
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2answers
48 views

What does “as poll nears” mean? [closed]

I just read The Jakarta Post I've got this: "Prabowo changes style in campaign as poll nears" what is the meaning of 'as poll nears', I've got some guesswork and I am not really sure about it, ...
2
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1answer
32 views

Is the usage of among in “Some philosophers are addressed, among who Deleuze, Derrida,…” right?

I would like to know whether my usage of among in the following sentence is correct or not: Thus, a dialogue is developed with some philosophers who discuss and unfold the concept of ‘being’, ...
3
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1answer
66 views

Are both “from the offset” and “from the outset” correct?

I had always seen that phrase as "from the outset", but recently I saw somebody writing "from the offset" (meaning "from the beginning"). Dictionary.com claims that "offset" can be a synonym for ...
3
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2answers
51 views

Resident advisor: an advisor who resides or someone who advises residents?

Google assures me that there's a position at various postsecondary institutions called "resident assistant", "resident advisor", or "resident adviser". This is a student who lives in a dormitory and ...
2
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4answers
66 views

What does “make the last word on word” mean?

I found the article of New Yorker magazine dealing with U.S. Supreme Court Justice, Antonin Scalia’s scrupulousness of the usage of words under the title’ “Salia’s word game” very interesting as an ...
6
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6answers
165 views

Word/phrase similar to bluster

I am looking for a phrase similar to bluster. Something like “he saw her ???? fade away”. I'm looking for a phrase that describes fake arrogance or sizing somone up and trying to show them that they ...
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1answer
83 views

No longer valid vs. Invalid [closed]

There is a subtle or perhaps more than subtle difference between the phrases "no longer valid" and "invalid". Can English experts elaborate with examples where one should be used and not the other.
0
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1answer
38 views

What's the difference between 'part of' and 'a part of '? [duplicate]

I usually see these sentences containing 'part of' or 'a part of' ,like 1.An apartment or compartment is part of a larger whole. 2.He spends at least a part of his time in reading. What's the ...
0
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1answer
88 views

how to say “etc” in a subject

I am translating some legal certificate and I need to indicate that a construction method and related factors are in accordance with a law. I am not sure what is the appropriate way to describe ...
0
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3answers
52 views

What does the phrase “for want of means” mean? [closed]

I came across this phrase in the following passage: Two instances of such forays have been particularly noted by scholars. In his essay “Of the Affection of Fathers to Their Children,” Montaigne, ...
6
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2answers
110 views

Where did the phrase “washing one's hands of” originate?

I know that the phrase "to wash one's hands of" comes from Pilate in the Bible, Matthew 27:24: When Pilate saw that he was getting nowhere, but that instead an uproar was starting, he took water ...
3
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1answer
218 views

What does “Emergency blame game” on Iraq mean?

New Yorker magazine (June 14) reports as follows under the headline, “Senator, John McCain calls for emergency blame game on Iraq.”: “Citing the deteriorating situation in the war-torn nation, ...
5
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4answers
386 views

“Battled-hardened,” Is this one of New Yorker's renowned idiosyncrasies?

There was a really entertaining short story describing customary exchanges of fierce words between a restaurant patron and waitress in New Yorker magazine (June 14.) under the title, “Lunch at ...
3
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1answer
88 views

Where does the phase “buy it” (to die) come from?

In English, the verb "buy" can be used to refer to somebody's having been killed, usually in the past tense; for example: Harry bought it in World War 2. Where does this phrase come from?
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2answers
85 views

Opt for, to be up for (and to be down for)

What's the difference between I opt for the party and I'm up for the party? And, to make it more complex, I'm down for the party. But I'm especially interested in the first two.
2
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1answer
61 views

What kind of phrase is this? [manically across the stage]

In the sentence: At the beginning of the play, the entire cast dances maniacally across the stage. What kind of phrase is [manically across the stage]? Is it an adverb phrase, prepositional phrase or ...
0
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1answer
96 views

Is “per E-Mail” an English phrase

Is it correct to say: "I'll send you this file per E-Mail"? Or "Please send me this file per E-Mail"? I know most people say "I'll send you this file by E-Mail" or "Please send me this ...
0
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7answers
160 views

Word meaning “without my asking”

There is a specific word meaning 'without my asking' and I cannot seem to recall it whatsoever. Used in a sentence: "she told me all about her personal life 'without my asking."
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1answer
73 views

Is the phrase ''a little bit'' superfluous? [closed]

What's the point of saying both words if one of them already implies a small amount of something? Doesn't it seem a bit redundant?
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0answers
41 views

Which phrase shall I choose, “take part in the project of or process of”?

Although it was compelled to enter the modern world by the Western countries, now China is taking part in the project of modernization more actively and has completed many great achievements in the ...
2
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1answer
47 views

Does this “come with” make sense in this sentence?

Food makes the human body survive, whereas Clothes decorate it. With decoration there comes propriety. (my translation for an ancient Chinese text) By "with decoration there comes propriety" I mean ...
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2answers
68 views

Does “you don't want X” mean “I don't recommend X to you”?

Quite often I read exchanges like this: — I want [something], I tried this and that but still no luck, how can I do that? — You don't want [it]. An example: example. I'm Russian, and this ...
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1answer
51 views

usage of terms “as well as ” and “as well” [closed]

Can anyone describe the usage of the terms "as well as" and "as well" in sentences? Are they interchangeable?
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6answers
2k views

Perception of the phrase “kindly let us know…”

Recently, I talked to a native speaker about the proper usage of the word “kindly”. I frequently use phrases like “kindly let us know whether you agree with the suggested approach” in business ...
3
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1answer
74 views

Usage of “What does who want?”

I have stumbled upon the phrase "What does who want?" which puzzles me. Its unusualness makes me doubt. I have been told it is used just as "What does he want?", with [who] replacing [he] when we ...
7
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7answers
2k views

How to say “You have this much work to do because you decided to do that much” more elegantly?

I want to try word this a bit more elegantly, fancy, etc. Basically that is a reply to a co-worker who said to me in an email saying "Too much work to do!" and I want to reply to that in an ...
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3answers
89 views

phrase request-'Luckily, it could have been worse'

It's like you just don't have money, but suddenly you realised you did put a note somewhere deep in your bag and you grab that out and just feel the mixture of being lucky and relief and pessimistic ...
0
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3answers
61 views

Period of time, a bit or a while

If I want to place my luggage at the hotel for a few hours, how is it best to ask if I can do this? Should I ask the receptionist: "Can I place my luggage here a bit?" or "Can I place my luggage ...
0
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1answer
25 views

regarding the meaning of a phrase

what is the meaning of the following phrase? once too often like he did it once too often Thanks in anticipation.
3
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1answer
158 views

What is the origin of “breaking bad”?

Wiktionary gives the meaning of "break bad" but does not mention about the origin: 1. (colloquial, of an event or of one's fortunes) To go wrong; to go downhill. 2. (colloquial, chiefly ...
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2answers
81 views

When something sounds too good to be true, it is or isn't?

I'm having a hard time understanding why the phrase is when something sounds too good to be true, it is and not when something sounds too good to be true, it isn't Because "when something ...
0
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1answer
62 views

Anything and everything

Is it correct to say, "Please feel free to change anything and everything in the draft"? I want to mean the reviewer can change as much as he wants (but want to say that more emphatically). What ...
2
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1answer
95 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
4
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5answers
314 views

Etymology of “Feeding the dragon”

I have heard the phrase "feeding the dragon" used to describe pouring time, resources, and energy into a situation that is self-perpetuating, caught in a positive feedback loop with negative ...
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1answer
93 views

What is meant by “cock a snook” . How to use it in sentence [closed]

When I was reading an article I came across a phrase "cock a snook". After browsing I did not find any convincing or clear meaning of this sentence. I also what to use this word in a sentence.
1
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1answer
91 views

What do you call this (these) writing “fallacies”

I just read this answer on Chinses.Stackexchange, and I see some obvious logical "leaps of faith" that I would like to know their most accurate and concise labels. Many thought it is difficult to ...
2
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2answers
56 views

Deal in vs deal with

I wrote this sentence: "The scientists dealing in complex systems have proposed...." But then I thought 'dealing with' would be correct. Are they interchangeable?
1
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4answers
99 views

A phrase for something that is beyond our reach or unattainable [closed]

“Sir Francis Chichester was knighted by the queen. But for his other circumnavigating counterparts, a knighthood is beyond reach...” What is an alternative term for beyond reach?
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2answers
125 views

“I can tell you but I'll have to kill you” - What to reply now? [closed]

I found myself dumbstruck when this punch line was spoken to me in soft sweet words by my friend. When I asked her about the guy she was flipping close her pic in cell. I am still thinking what is the ...
0
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1answer
99 views

Hurt someone and say “sorry” - Is there a word to describe this type of behaviour and/or people? [closed]

People unintentionally hurt others whilst in the middle of an argument, it could happen anywhere: in public or even in the privacy of one's bedroom. When they finally realize their mistake, they end ...
2
votes
2answers
102 views

What is opposite of “Love”? [closed]

In a argument with my friend who lost her love, I came across her experience of life and what she said is : Opposite of love is NOT Hate. why, Because in love people have feeling and think about ...
13
votes
12answers
2k views

What word or phrase means “a loss of what was on your mind”?

Sometimes, in the middle of a conversation, a "loss of mind" can affect the speaker. What is the word for that situation and that person ? Are there more specific terms or phrases than: the loss ...
0
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4answers
136 views

Late Night vs Early Morning [duplicate]

Can anyone explain me Difference between late night & early morning ? "I slept early morning".Is this sentence correct ? What time is called morning ? After 12:00 AM ?
0
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2answers
82 views

Omission of a verb?

This is from George Orwell's Down and Out in Paris and London: "Thereupon a whole variegated chorus of yells, as windows were flung open on every side and half the street joined in the quarrel." ...
6
votes
7answers
586 views

Is “Upload from XML” valid in English?

Imagine an example.xml file that contains some data. Then there's a website where you can type or upload this data, so there are a few links such as "Manual Input" or "Upload from XML". Which one of ...
0
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1answer
67 views

Origin of “Seek first to understand, then to be understood”

One of the Seven Habits of Highly Effective People (according to Stephen Covey) is: Seek First to Understand, Then to be Understood What is the origin of this phrase? My guess is that it was ...