-2
votes
0answers
40 views

Is it correct: “there's no more a beautiful face” [on hold]

Is it right to write this: "there's no more a beautiful face than..." I am asking about "no more a". Is there a classier way to say this?
1
vote
1answer
46 views

usage of terms “as well as ” and “as well” [closed]

Can anyone describe the usage of the terms "as well as" and "as well" in sentences? Are they interchangeable?
10
votes
6answers
1k views

Perception of the phrase “kindly let us know…”

Recently, I talked to a native speaker about the proper usage of the word “kindly”. I frequently use phrases like “kindly let us know whether you agree with the suggested approach” in business ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

conceived of as vs. conceived as

When I want to write that some something has been "taken to mean" or "understood" or "interpreted as" XYZ, I sometimes use the phrase "to conceive of something as XYZ, where XYZ usually is a longer ...
4
votes
5answers
296 views

Etymology of “Feeding the dragon”

I have heard the phrase "feeding the dragon" used to describe pouring time, resources, and energy into a situation that is self-perpetuating, caught in a positive feedback loop with negative ...
2
votes
2answers
102 views

What is opposite of “Love”? [closed]

In a argument with my friend who lost her love, I came across her experience of life and what she said is : Opposite of love is NOT Hate. why, Because in love people have feeling and think about ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Is there such a thing as a reverse dictionary? [duplicate]

Is there any tool online that generally permits me to enter a phrase or idea and get back a word that means something similar? For example, if I were looking for a better word or phrase for arguing ...
1
vote
2answers
59 views

“Healthy” vs “healthful”— Do fruits and veggies work out?

The OED doesn't say much other than the two words have long been synonyms since the 1500s. healthful - promoting good health healthy - being in good health/condition Why do we say that ...
0
votes
2answers
30 views

Meaning of “appreciate the calm”

From a web development book: Instead of taking a moment to appreciate the calm, developers have taken advantage of the stabilizing front-end platform to pile on a whole new wave of front-end ...
0
votes
2answers
113 views

“Martyr To” vs “Martyr For”

This book specifies the difference as: martyr for something: smb. who is made to suffer severely for a cause martyr to something: smb. who is acutely inflicted by something Oxford ...
29
votes
10answers
6k views

Is there a word/term for a question where the asker knows he'll criticise any answer?

What do you call it when a person asks somebody a question when they know they'll criticise any answer regardless? For instance, a man asks you something like "If you were recruiting staff would you ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Usage of “walking out clean”

Is the following sentence grammatically correct? "I just hope he walks out clean from the probe" If not, what is the correct form? EDIT: The context of the above sentence is a situation where you ...
2
votes
2answers
276 views

Which is more grammatically correct - “performance in” or “performance on”?

Which of the following is more grammatically correct? a. John's performance on the test shocked the teacher. (or) b. John's performance in the test shocked the teacher.
4
votes
2answers
275 views

What is the context in which 'ice breaking' is a good thing?

If you are on a frozen lake and the ice breaks you basically plunge into cold water. That could end badly. What is the explanation for 'getting to know everyone', or 'getting the conversation ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

A word that refers to a previously mentioned action [closed]

I am trying to refer back to the action "act swiftly" mentioned previously, but I am not sure if I am in the right direction. I thought of a few possible solutions as follows. An entire rephrasing of ...
1
vote
1answer
70 views

Using “life partners” to refer to items [closed]

What would you say if you saw the phrase containing "life partners" referring not to people but goods (or any items)? I do realize that this is tricky, but in fact this is the goal. Like yellow press ...
2
votes
4answers
106 views

How does one convey in a single phrase, the act of failing several times and succeeding finally?

How does one convey in a single phrase, the act of failing several times and succeeding finally? I wrote something like "Several trials and errors later, I had found the solution" Is this valid ...
1
vote
2answers
115 views

What are the right adjectives to refer to changes in gravity?

How should one refer to the changes in gravity? Should one say: "gravity became higher/lower" or "gravity became lighter/heavier?"
2
votes
3answers
137 views

“all the way down to” phrase with geographical locations

Is the following usage correct: I drove from Los Angeles all the way down to San Diego. given that San Diego is at the south of Los Angeles? Can it be used for geographical directions?
3
votes
3answers
70 views

Is “cast the balance to some/someone's side” a standard usage or a figure of speech?

...this biass, though, perhaps, it may not appear in a few throws, will certainly prevail in a great number, and will cast the balance entirely to that side. (David Hume, Of the Rise and Progress ...
-1
votes
2answers
257 views

What is a “Thank you” (categorisation of)

Could someone advise me please what kind of word/phrase is "thank you" or a "thank you" if you prefer. For example in this sample letter what sort of phrase is "thank you"? Dear Sir, What ...
2
votes
0answers
53 views

Is there a name for this kind of phrases? [duplicate]

I often times heard phrases like itty-bitty, nitty-gritty etc, the latter word followed part of the previous word's syllable(mostly ends with -y), I want to know the names for this kinds of phrases.
-5
votes
1answer
85 views

Shred off heat? [closed]

I heard a phrase which I'm not sure it's this but I liked it. It was a classical radio station in Southern California. It was a hot day and radio was playing a song about ice and snow, and the ...
5
votes
1answer
166 views

Does the phrase 'human race' allude to the idea of a relay?

Describing the history of humanity as a 'race' might seem odd to a listener who hadn't heard it before. Is the image behind this phrase alluding to the idea that human beings reproduce and pass on ...
1
vote
3answers
422 views

How to use “learn you” [closed]

While I was reading "The Adventures of Tom sawyer",I came across this phrase. Huck said ,"I will learn you." Is it right to say like that?Or we should say "I will learn from you"?
4
votes
2answers
228 views

Has the term ‘weapons of mass distraction’ gotten currency as a metonym for web sites and lowbrow mass media contents?

I found the term ‘weapons of mass distraction’ in the article titled “Social Networking in the 1600s” in the Sunday Review section of June 22 New York Times, which begins with; “Social networks ...
1
vote
1answer
195 views

Would you say “wanna” when you want something? [closed]

Would you say "wanna" when you want something? For example, "I wanna a new PC", instead of "I want a new PC"?
2
votes
1answer
14k views

Is it correct to say “I would like to inquire about something?”

When I make a call to get some information regarding a matter, I generally start the conversation with "Hello, I would like to inquire about something." Is this a correct usage? If not, what would be ...
1
vote
1answer
467 views

Phrase for “suddenly wake up from a dream”

What is a natural thing to say when you suddenly wake up from a dream? The impression I have in mind is of something like burst/tear apart or escape from the dream scene by waking up.
3
votes
1answer
136 views

“puzzled why” vs “puzzled as to why”

Is "puzzled why" correct as well? Is it just a choice of style? Or is there a difference in meaning? And if so, I'm curious (as to) what that difference is.
5
votes
1answer
23k views

How to use “no pun intended”?

The phrase "no pun intended" is often added after someone made a pun or something that could be considered a pun. If this should be taken literally (i.e. it really was unintentional), then I'm not ...
2
votes
4answers
523 views

Can “famous last words” be used in positive way as a response in conversation?

I came across the phrase, ““famous last words.” I took it literally as the last word delivered by famous people. But Wikipedia defines““famous last words” other than this sense as: used in a ...
3
votes
2answers
171 views

Is it correct to say “don't let it trouble you”?

I am wondering if it is correct to use the sentence "Don't let it trouble you." Would native speakers find it natural?
1
vote
1answer
7k views

What does 'back-stopping' mean?

We have a tender document, and it lists how the offer should be proposed. Basically this is split into 3 sections: Rationale Strategy Details of Proposal Under section 2., there is the below ...
4
votes
4answers
534 views

“Most” vs. “most of”

During most of history, humans were too busy to think about thought. Why is "most of history" correct in the above sentence? I could understand the difference between "Most of the people" and ...
3
votes
4answers
215 views

Can we use “off-chance” in a scientific paper?

In an article that I'm writing, I would like to say that some special ideas are at a disadvantage concerning their consistency in producing results. In other words, we use those approaches in the hope ...
21
votes
5answers
4k views

Is “what on earth” still commonly used in real life? Is there any alternative that is not cursing or obscene?

I'm a non-native speaker. When I was at school, we were taught that "on earth" is used for emphasis in questions such as: What on earth are you talking about? However, from my experience ...
2
votes
2answers
968 views

Can I use “way how to” to express a method of doing something?

I always thought that this phrase is wrong. That I can use either "the way to do something" or "how to do something". However, I find the phrase way how to very often in various places and that puts ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Is “Give (get) space” a common usage for “give (get) flexibility / freedom”?

NSNBC (March 26) reported that President Obama was overheard telling Russian President Dmitry Medvedev to “give him space" until after November during his meetings in South Korea on missile defense, ...
2
votes
3answers
4k views

What is correct: “bind to” or “bind with”?

What is a correct phrase: “bind to” or “bind with”? If both are correct, when should I use the first form, and when the second?
5
votes
1answer
714 views

Where does the phrase “It's a good job that …” come from?

In a recent link the phrase "It's a good job that..." is used. I take it to mean the same as It's a good thing that ... but I've never in my almost 50 years of English heard job used like that ...
1
vote
3answers
372 views

Is it correct to say 'two/three parter movie'?

I have been wondering about this for sometime now. I often hear people say two-parter. Is it correct/formal? I want to describe a documentary movies consisting of three parts. Three-parter movie? ...
5
votes
4answers
8k views

“You aren't in” vs. “You're not in” [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: “They are not”: “they're not” versus “they aren't” I noticed that you aren't in and you're not in are two ways to shorten you ...
4
votes
4answers
750 views

Is “since I'm” now an acceptable alternative to “since I was”?

In a recent episode of the television show Entourage, Ari Gold (a 40 year old man) says: I've known her since I'm 19. In an episode of Sex and the City, a character, who is 15, tells Carrie: ...
9
votes
3answers
2k views

Is ‘Take something cum grano salis’ a popular phrase? Can I use it in casual conversation?

I came across the phrase, ‘cum grano salis’ in the article written by Chris Cillizza, a political pundit in the August 8th Washington Post’s article under the title ‘GOP smells blood in Presidential ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

'Depend upon' or 'depend on' [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Which phrase is correct: “dependent on” or “dependent upon” Is there a difference between the usage of 'depend upon' and 'depend on' or is one ...
2
votes
2answers
914 views

“Sleep in” versus “Sleep out”

Over the years, I have often debated whether the phrase is "In the morning, I'm going to sleep in." or "In the morning, I'm going to sleep out." My best guess is that it is a regional difference of ...
15
votes
3answers
4k views

Is it a “driver license” or a “driver's license” or a “drivers license” or…what?

I've often wondered why my Ohio license is called a "driver license". It is awkward to say it like that. Wouldn't something like driver's license be more appropriate? Or driving license (like ...
13
votes
7answers
2k views

How long does it take to mull something over?

I used the phrase "we'll mull it over" in an e-mail. My intent was to let the readers know that we (the team) needed to give it due consideration and come up with a considered response to their ...