0
votes
2answers
69 views

Is it “Bride Weds Groom” or “Groom Weds Bride”? [closed]

I am designing a wedding invitation for my friend. I want to know which of the following is the correct form to print on the invitation: Bride's Name Weds Groom's Name or is it Groom's Name ...
14
votes
6answers
750 views

Why does left come before right?

For example in the idioms "left and right", "left, right and centre", and in many contexts where both left and right are mentioned, it seems that the left usually comes before the right. Why is this ...
3
votes
2answers
939 views

“to further assist [you]” — Split infinitive or fixed VP?

From a descriptive standpoint (and the problem that English has at least two words in an infinitive), I understand why the split infinitive is becoming more acceptable, but is there any other excuse ...
1
vote
3answers
198 views

The phrase 'give you me'

There was another sentence that I wasn't sure about: "Rather, O blessed one, give you me boldness to abide within the harmless laws of peace, avoiding strife and hatred and the violent fiends of ...
2
votes
4answers
255 views

What is the correct way to phrase this?

I asked this question on meta.stackoverflow.com, but I need some help. What would be the correct way to phrase "...diverse topics from software programming to cooking to photography and gaming." Or if ...
13
votes
9answers
1k views

“Assign a variable to a value” or the other way round?

I was wondering which of these phrases is/are correct: assign a variable to a value assign a value to a variable I'd say the second is correct, but I'm not a native speaker. A quick Google search ...
8
votes
4answers
591 views

“Back up data” or “back data up”?

Which is correct? To back up data. To back data up. The context is the following: He was careful enough to perform tests and [back up data | back data up] to avoid any problems.
2
votes
2answers
154 views

How to express a chronological dependency?

How do I express a chronological dependency between two events? Is it alright to say : "Event A must be chronologically after Event B"? Any suggestions are welcome.
7
votes
3answers
2k views

“You're not the boss of me” vs “You're not my boss”

For some years now I've heard You're not the boss of me increasingly more often relative to the more "correct, natural" (to me, at least) You're not my boss. Thanks to the magic of NGrams, I've ...
3
votes
5answers
307 views

“The place where we promised to meet”

This is talking about a promise to meet at a certain place. However, is it grammatically correct? Is it badly phrased? It seems that it can be misinterpreted to mean that at a certain place a promise ...
5
votes
2answers
214 views

Can “having an affair” work both ways?

The married person in an affair is clearly having one, but is the unmarried participant? To use a well-known real-life example, Bill Clinton had an affair with Monica Lewinsky. But did Monica ...
26
votes
8answers
35k views

Distinction: “What can I do you for?” vs. “What can I do for you?”

Usually, when being served the phrase "What can I do for you?" is used but sometimes I also hear "What can I do you for?" in quite the same context. So is there a difference or is it just a slip of ...
1
vote
4answers
239 views

“What score are we playing until?” or how to ask it?

Every day Jack and Ted have about 5–15 minutes to go outside and play table tennis in the afternoon. As their free time varies each time (sometimes it's 5 minutes, sometimes 10, sometimes 15), they ...
8
votes
5answers
729 views

Having or eating one's cake

Which is it? "You cannot eat your cake and have it, too," meaning you can have it or you can eat it, but once it's gone there's no cake left to eat. "You cannot have your cake and eat it, too", ...
5
votes
2answers
161 views

What's the difference in saying “the average family” vs. “the family average”?

Consider these two sentences: A Scranton family has an average of 2.1 children. The average Scranton family has 2.1 children. I've seen both used. The first one seems reasonable, but the ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

Not only… but also

Consider the following: Not only you should be able to speak but also able to write. You should be able to not only speak but also write. You should not only be able to speak but also be ...
3
votes
3answers
165 views

“The last movie I played” vs “the movie I played last”

On a chat channel today I was reading two people talk about some of the more popular movie formats and movie players available. One of the interlocutors said something that got me thinking. I will cut ...