1
vote
3answers
53 views

“Her water broke” or “Her waters broke”

Which is more correct: "Her water broke." or "Her waters broke." I've been searching online and I've found uses of both "water" and "waters" in various places, but none of them very authoritative. I ...
-1
votes
3answers
151 views

Difference between 'I would like to be' & 'I want to be'

I would like to be and I want to be What is the difference between them? I think 'want to be' sounds stronger than 'like to be,' but I'm not sure if this is true.
-5
votes
2answers
80 views

What's the difference between “known as” and “known for”? [closed]

Above the title. What's the difference between "known as" and "known for"?
1
vote
1answer
237 views

Is there a difference between “at the example of” and “using the example of”?

"This is illustrated at the example of Foobar." versus "This is illustrated using the example of Foobar." Are they interchangeable? If not, what is the difference?
0
votes
4answers
256 views

Can 'I would say' always replace 'I think'?

There is a question about 'I guess' and one answer is comparing 'I guess', and 'I would say'. I would say characterizes what follows as a personal opinion or judgment: From what I know of him I ...
1
vote
1answer
114 views

Are “go on”; “go for it”; “Carry on” and “go ahead” synonymous?

I saw “Carry on” vs. “go ahead” A friend of mine said this to me, and it sounded kind weird for me... If you know a better way "go on" I would say If you know a better way "go for it" Are ...
1
vote
2answers
572 views

“At someone's place” vs. “at someone's house” vs. “at someone's”

Do the three phrases convey the same meaning when we're referring to the place where one lives?
0
votes
1answer
300 views

“Carry on” vs. “go ahead”

I am confused about whether it is okay to say, "Ok, carry on/go ahead with your job then." Any help on this simple issue is highly appreciated.
0
votes
1answer
720 views

when should I use the following sentence. I am little bit confused

when should I use the following sentence. I am little bit confused: "May I help you?" "What can I do for you?" What is the difference between above two sentence and when I can use them? Please ...
1
vote
4answers
484 views

What is the difference between “splitting something” and “dividing something”?

What is the difference between "splitting something" and "dividing something"? When do people say split and when do they say divide?
-1
votes
2answers
879 views

What does it mean to say “The greater of _ or _” [closed]

I am reading a document, and it is confusing me and want to be certain of the meaning of this sentence: OUR COMPANY'S TOTAL LIABILITY TO YOU FOR ACTUAL DAMAGES FOR ANY CAUSE WHATSOEVER WILL BE ...
1
vote
1answer
759 views

A number off or a number of?

I am reading some technical documents and there is a list of items that make up the product. Throughout the document where there are multiple items, they are listed as 2 off, 3 off and so on. For ...
-2
votes
1answer
94 views

Meaning of “in a look of a frame of reference” [closed]

Does "in a look of a frame of reference" mean "regarding to sth."? Sorry, unfortunately I couldn't find a simple example.
1
vote
1answer
8k views

“Would have” and “would have no”

Could you describe about "would have ~ed" & "would have not ~ed". I know would has the several meanings. But when I was talking with one of my friend who is a native speaker and in this following ...
-1
votes
1answer
136 views

“I may know where it is” vs. “I know where it may be”

I am wondering if the following two sentences have different meanings. I may know where it is. I know where it may be.
1
vote
2answers
127 views

Difference between “Knock it off!” and “Drop it!”

What is the difference between "Knock it off!" and "Drop it!". I do translate both as "Stop it". Is there any context-based usage difference? Thank you.
0
votes
1answer
342 views

Under which cases should an article (a/an/the) not be used? [duplicate]

The current machine has been repaired. Current machine has been repaired. Which is more natural? What are the subtle differences between them? Under which cases should an article ...
5
votes
2answers
3k views

“integer multiple” vs. “integral multiple”

Nine is an integer multiple of three. Nine is an integral multiple of three. Which is more common? If both are accepted, what's the subtle difference between them?
1
vote
1answer
157 views

Differences in the Semantics of Three Tri-Part Phrasal Verbs

What are the subtle semantic differences in the following three tri-part phrasal verbs: (1) be up against (2) come up against (3) run up against
1
vote
1answer
633 views

Idioms and Phrasal Verbs

By definition an idiom is an expression or phrase that cannot be understood by the sum of its parts. There are, of course, many idioms that we can understand by virtue of their transparency like "shed ...
0
votes
3answers
312 views

“in a word” vs “in a sentence”

In a word, you are wrong! In a sentence, you are wrong! Which is more natural? I feel "in a word" is more common than "in a sentence", but "you are wrong!" consists of three words rather ...
-1
votes
3answers
636 views

Semantic difference between “if I did not want” and “if I wanted”

I was reading My Antonia and came across this line: [She] asked me if I did not want to go to the garden with her (12) And was wondering why Cather chose if I did not want over if I wanted. Are ...
4
votes
2answers
4k views

Why do we say “right-hand side”?

This question is in reference to the use of the word "hand" in "right-hand side" (and applies equally to the left). My question is what does "right-hand side" say/imply that "right side" doesn't?
0
votes
1answer
381 views

Can “an act of protest” and “a sign of protest” be used interchangeably? Are they idioms that are synonymous to each other? [closed]

Can "an act of protest" and "a sign of protest" be used interchangeably? Are there contexts where one of these phrases should be used, and not the other? Also, are "act of protest" and "sign of ...
2
votes
1answer
599 views

Proper use of “context” in a phrase

Which of the following phrases is correct? Everything is in some context. or Everything has some context.
7
votes
1answer
1k views

What's the difference between “Yours sincerely” and “Sincerely yours”?

I have read online that "Yours sincerely" is British English and "Sincerely yours" is American English. Is this true? Or is the difference in formality? I think the first one is more formal and the ...
1
vote
2answers
273 views

Differences between “stupid to the last drop” and “stupid”

My colleague was screaming You are stupid to the last drop at another colleague who accidentally formatted her hard disk. Is there such an expression as stupid to the last drop? Are there ...
-5
votes
3answers
397 views

Meaning of “run down your debts/assets” and “dissave” [closed]

What does this sentence mean? The private sector is seeking to run down its debts. A similar construction is the following one: The Janets must be prepared to dissave, to run down their ...
2
votes
3answers
373 views

How different is “Be rid of somebody” from “Get rid of somebody”? Are they interchangeable?

In the movie review article of Clint Eastwood’s “J. Edgar” in the New Yorker magazine (November 14) titled “the Man in Charge,” there was the following sentence: “A single scene with Robert F. ...
0
votes
2answers
2k views

“What's the problem with you?” vs. “What's the matter with you?”

Is there a difference between saying What's the problem with you? and What's the matter with you?
8
votes
4answers
634 views

“Back up data” or “back data up”?

Which is correct? To back up data. To back data up. The context is the following: He was careful enough to perform tests and [back up data | back data up] to avoid any problems.
1
vote
2answers
474 views

“I'm just like anyone else” or “I am not like other people”?

I am translating a Russian phrase, original meaning of which was: I am the same as all other people. A suggested translation is: I'm just like anyone else. I think it should be: I ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

“tailored towards” or “tailored to”?

Which one would you prefer, in particular in combination with "the needs"? Google finds a lot more for "tailored to" (30 millions) than for "tailored towards" (only 600 thousands).
0
votes
2answers
213 views

“shaving cream” vs. “shave cream”

I read this term shave cream in NY Times today. According to the results in COCA (Corpus of Contemporary American English), shaving cream (I also found this word in the dictionary) is far more common ...
0
votes
2answers
712 views

What does “life plays tricks on him” mean?

What does this statement mean? Life plays tricks on him. Is it similar to He has a twisted fate.
11
votes
3answers
20k views

Difference between phrase, idiom and expression [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What is the difference between an expression and a phrase? Difference between “phrase” and “idiom” What is the difference between a phrase, an ...
6
votes
4answers
13k views

Difference between “On your mark, get set, go” and “Ready, steady, go”

Watching Kipper with my son tonight, I was struck by the phrase "Ready, steady, go!" I don't often hear this sequence. In my upbringing, it has been mostly "On your mark, get set, go!" I had ...
17
votes
8answers
5k views

Ripe with Opportunity? Or Rife?

The Grammarist says I should use rife with rather than ripe with. So far so good and I agree. But is there an exception for ripe with opportunity? Googlefight overwhelmingly prefers ripe, and I like ...
3
votes
6answers
3k views

“Headed in the right direction” or “heading in the right direction”?

I've heard people using both expressions. Which one is correct, or are they basically the same?
1
vote
2answers
1k views

What is the difference between “what do you think” and “how about”?

These two sentences seem to be the same to me. Is there any difference between them, and are there circumstances in which I can only use one of them instead of the other?
3
votes
3answers
1k views

“just married” or “just wed”?

I saw this for the first time in something recent: "just wed". I wonder how and when it is used (BrE only, under certain conditions). Does it mean exactly the same as "married"?
26
votes
8answers
41k views

Distinction: “What can I do you for?” vs. “What can I do for you?”

Usually, when being served the phrase "What can I do for you?" is used but sometimes I also hear "What can I do you for?" in quite the same context. So is there a difference or is it just a slip of ...
0
votes
2answers
956 views

Difference between “keep something on”, “hang something on”, and “leave something on”

I came across three verb + on phrases in today’s New York Times article written by Maureen Dowd and titled “Stripped off Dignity”; it dealt with unpleasant airport pat-down practices. In the ...
12
votes
11answers
22k views

“Environmentally-friendly” vs. “Environment-friendly”

"Environmentally-friendly" sounds completely normal to me. So does "Environment-friendly". But I'm pretty sure I favour the former (despite the fact that I normally prefer the shorter of any two ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Meaning of “all left reserved” and “all right reserved”?

Could somebody please clarify the meaning of these two expressions and the differences between them: "All Right Reserved" and "All Left Reserved"?
7
votes
1answer
6k views

“Even though” vs. “even if”

Are these two totally synonymous? Can one be used in place of the other anywhere? Are there any differences in nuance, or anything at all?
2
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the difference between using “in the way” and “on the way”?

I'm a Spanish native speaker. I'm learning English and I want to know the difference between using "in the way" and "on the way". I want to know the real meaning of both phrases. PS: Sorry for my ...
6
votes
2answers
22k views

Difference between “cross with you” and “angry with you”

Can anyone tell me what the difference is between 'I'm cross with you' and 'I'm angry with you'? I have the feeling that being cross with someone (by the way, can you be cross 'at'? or is one always ...
10
votes
3answers
151 views

Mike brought cake VS mike brought cake with him

What's the difference between these two expressions: Mike brought his guitar. Mike brought his guitar with him. How does "with him" change the meaning of the sentence?
1
vote
2answers
10k views

“Interested in knowing” versus “interested to know”

I am interested to know if, for some, there is a subtle difference between the two phrases in the title. I am equally interested in knowing if there is a subtle difference.