A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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Who uses the term Hail the King?

Looking for information on who or what time in history the phrase "Hail the King" was used, not hail to the king. When this phrase was said it was followed by what sounds like a foot stomping on the ...
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1answer
26 views

Which is correct: “I feel tempted to” or “I have the temptation to”

While asking a question earlier, this issue sprung into my mind. I immediately decided to use the phrase "having the temptation to", but later decided to correct it to "feeling the temptation to". So ...
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33 views

Please help with this qustion! [on hold]

I am Christina Nunez and i am trying to figure out if the answer 9+10 is 21 or 19? Comment to give me your answer/ opinion. Please, thank you!
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1answer
37 views

“What are our numbers?”

How can I correctly ask a question like "What are our numbers?" meaning what are the number of people in the audience in comparison with number of people in some other audience.
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3answers
61 views

How to say a person is a star of something or some activity? [on hold]

How can we call a person who has excelled in some event, a sort of a star in it?
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2answers
69 views

Phrases like “Fifth Beatle” or “Fourth estate”

Is there a term for phrases like Fifth Beatle when there's four main Beatles, fourth estate when there were originally only three estates, or Mongolia's Third neighbor policy when it only has two ...
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7answers
44 views

synonym for someone who is a “fraud” or “liar”

He portrayed himself to be a really straightforward, hardworking person that always keeps their word, always shows up and is on time when they make plans, but turned out to be completely the opposite ...
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2answers
92 views
+50

Is “Next to that” really an alternative to “Additionally” or “Moreover”?

I see many of my compatriots use the phrase "Next to that" at the start of a sentence to mean "Additionally", "Moreover", "Furthermore" or "In addition". The reason for this, I feel, may be that the ...
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2answers
28 views

What is the difference between the two phrases to meet you and meeting you? [closed]

Why the below one is correct? I look forward to meeting you. And why this one is wrong? I look forward to meet you. I generally do these mistakes in letter writing.
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1answer
41 views

What are the adverb for shabby and hardy? [closed]

What are the adverbs for shabby and hardy are, and what are their corresponding noun and adjective?
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1answer
22 views

Do phrases “Yes, it did not.” and “No, it did not.” have different meanings? [duplicate]

Let say the question is: So this ended up not working? What is the proper way to say, this indeed not work? These two seem fine to me: Yes, it did not. or No, it did not. Are they ...
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2answers
51 views

What is the origin of the phrase “got the hump”? [on hold]

depressed, in a bad mood but I am wondering did it come from camels?
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4answers
336 views

The Road Warrior

In modern business speak one increasingly sees the phrase "Road Warrior" used to refer to people who spend a lot of their time travelling for work. Looking at it independentaly this seems a bit of an ...
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3answers
433 views

Should I use “and anyway” or “and by the way” in the following case?

It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And anyway, why is he so sure about it? He's not an astronomer." It's very unlikely for a planet to hit the Earth. And by the way, why is ...
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0answers
25 views

Ending a letter [closed]

In ending a letter, which is more appropriate? "The Foundation is indeed appreciate your support over the previous years" "The Foundation appreciated you support ..." "The Foundation is indeed ...
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0answers
33 views

Can “as matter of fact” be used to express a contradictory opinion?

I'm aware you can do that with actually: actually ...used when expressing a contradictory or unexpected opinion or correcting someone. "‘Tom's happy anyway.’ ‘He isn't, actually, not any ...
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1answer
41 views

“One from another” or “from one another”?

Suppose I have a collection of objects (more than two). I wanted to write "They are at a certain distance one from another". Someone pointed out I should write "They are at a certain distance from ...
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12answers
5k views

Is there a word or an idiom for people who only spend their families' money and fool around?

Is there a word or an idiom for rich people who spend only their families' money and do not bother to work, just fool around?
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1answer
35 views

To make it clear + question (or to be sure, to make sure)

"To make it clear", "To be sure", "To make sure" + Question I'm wondering if I can use some of them like this?: To make clear, what is the most important requirement for the project? To be sure, ...
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2answers
61 views

alternate phrase for 'satisfying the thirst'? [closed]

I am trying to compose a poetry. There is a line which goes like this - 'you are like a river that'll satisfy the the thirst of the sea/ocean ' . I want to know if there are alternative phrases for ...
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2answers
51 views

antonym of “to register with”

What is the antonym of the phrase to register with? I'm not looking for the antonym of to register itself (that's to deregister) but for the correct dependent preposition. For example: to register ...
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2answers
62 views

Is “I wish I had one of those …” correctly used in the following sentence?

Sex Education Club? I wish I had one of those when I was a student. The bolded part actually means, I wish my university had had one of those so I could have joined . . . But I picked I wish I ...
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1answer
44 views

How do I reword this sentence as an effective description for a resume? [closed]

I took over the bookkeeping for a small company after they had been methodically robbed (over the course of a year) by their previous bookkeeper. How do I word this in a manner appropriate for use on ...
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2answers
42 views

“Thought of” vs. “thought about”. What's the difference? [duplicate]

What's the difference between "thought of" and "thought about"? One difference I'm aware of is that you use "thought of" when something comes to mind but you don't analyze it, and "thought about" if ...
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3answers
131 views

What's the meaning of “that's saying a lot.”?

I heard somebody say a couple of things and they concluded by saying "and that's saying a lot". What does it mean? Does it mean it's a bit of a big deal? or an achievement of sorts? Some example ...
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1answer
37 views

“answered in” or “answered”?

I'm confused whether the verb answer should come with the preposition in or without it in a sentence "the timing a question will be answered in is important" or "the timing a question will be answered ...
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5answers
68 views

What is the word that describes a demanding look?

Is there an idiom or a single verb for a patronizing stare or a demanding look? As if someone can speak with his looks and says something like "No!", "Stop!", "Do it now!" and makes people obey no ...
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3answers
2k views

What is the action called when a grumpy old man shows that he is annoyed, by making a 'throat-clearing' sound?

Sometimes when a grumpy old man gets annoyed, he makes noises like clearing his throat. Does grumbling or grunting define that action? Is there a more appropriate word or an idiom for that?
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8answers
104 views

Is there a word or an idiom for respecting someone because you are afraid of him?

I am looking for a word or an idiom about showing respect to someone superior in work because you are afraid of him. I'm not talking about real respect or showing respect to him or his works, just ...
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2answers
45 views

Should I use 'follow lemma (1)' or 'follow from lemma (1)'?

In mathematical papers, some theorems are proved based on some existing lemmas. Then, should I use Following lemma (1), we prove... or Following from lemma (1), we prove...
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1answer
33 views

Is the phrase “horizon road” grammatically correct? [closed]

Is the phrase "horizon road" grammatically correct, and if so, is it equal to "road to horizon"?
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2answers
50 views

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct? [duplicate]

Is 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' correct?. In some published papers, I either see 'e.g.,' or 'e.g.' used in some sentences or phrases. Can someone justify and comment?
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1answer
48 views

What does You play to pay mean? Thanks.

Actually it's from comedy, Weird loners. What does You play to pay mean? Thanks. Text from phone : Where's my money ? I know where you live. You play to pay ! 1K tomorrow. In case you can't ...
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3answers
114 views

What does you are getting reamed mean? [closed]

Ms C is accusing Ms Z of eating the cheese that Ms C bought. Ms C and Ms Z are room mates. Ms C sees a therapist about it. Ms Z: I don't eat that kind of cheese. Ms C: You do eat that kind ...
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2answers
41 views

“States Party to” or “State Parties to” or “States parties to”?

When discussing a treaty or international agreement, which is correct? "There are 100 states party to the treaty." (for example, as used here) Or: "There are 100 state parties to the treaty." (for ...
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1answer
72 views

Isn't it redundant to use “then” after “if”?

Since "if P, Q" is grammatical, is it not the case that the "then" in "if P, then Q" is redundant? Where P and Q are clauses. For example, "if it rains today, the road shall be wet tomorrow" is ...
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6answers
695 views

Another way to say “it never hurts”

It wouldn't hurt you to be a bit more serious. Wouldn't/won't/never hurts make perfect sense in this example. I'm wondering if there's any alternative way to preserve the meaning of this phrase in a ...
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2answers
42 views

american english phrase request grammar [duplicate]

Is it proper to say: Please join me, my family and crew in celebrating my Bat Mitzvah? Or should there be a'my' before crew? Thank you!
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1answer
63 views

“Take/Consider … as an example” vs “Take/Consider … for example”

For more than a decade, I have always seen/used the phrase "Take/Consider ... as an example" followed by a comma. Then, my recent visit on this page got me confused and raised more questions in me. ...
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1answer
38 views

From/Since time immemorial

Which is correct? 'From' or 'Since' when applied to 'time immemorial'? I have seen both around, and have a feeling it might be 'from', but would like to check.
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1answer
44 views

Meaning of the phrase “empty your pipe against the heel of your boot” [closed]

Not being a native English speaker, I'm reading What to Talk About to improve my communication skills. While reading, I came across this phrase: empty your pipe against the heel of your boot. I ...
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1answer
53 views

Is “be my guests” correctly used in the following case?

Speaker A: We want to ask you some questions. If you don't mind, of course. Speaker B: [He opens the door of his house] Sure, be my guests. Is the idiom being used correctly? If not, what ...
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6answers
1k views

A Pyrrhic defeat?

Is there a word, phrase or allusion which represents the opposite of a Pyrrhic Victory: a tactical defeat which led to a strategic victory, either accidental or intended? After all, there must be one ...
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2answers
57 views

Is the phrase “…could only know by then” correct?

He told me he would give me the answer after the trip. Was there something he could only know by then? I don't know why but it sounds a little weird to me. Anyway, to make sure I searched on ...
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2answers
951 views

Why does “footing the bill” mean “to pay”?

I hear people using the term footing the bill used to describe paying for something. Why is the verb foot used to describe the meaning of paying?
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2answers
37 views

What's the proper phrase for “ way behind~”

I am trying to write a sentence like Country X is way behind in terms of animal rights compared to other countries. I think the phrase way behind is colloquial but I cannot think of a “proper” ...
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0answers
16 views

Question on using the phrase “draw on” in context. [on hold]

Is this a proper use? "He is an icon in that he acts as a symbol to draw on."
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1answer
44 views

“Correct” way to describe “looking at someone with new eyes” or similar?

I'm not a native English-speaker, so I'm not sure how to "correctly" phrase the following... When you learn something new about a person, than makes you look at him "with new eyes" - and perhaps ...
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1answer
2k views

What does “The deck is stacked” in Hillary Clinton’s presidencial candidacy announcement mssage mean?

Washington Post’s (April 15) carries an article under the title, “Hillary Clinton sounded a little like Elizabeth Warren in 2008, too” accompanied with the following lead copy. “Hillary Clinton's ...
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20 views

Shorthand for the phrase

Looking for shorthand for phrase - "Not mapped in target document", or "Not present in target document". I have it to be distinguishable with "Not mapped in actual document".