A phrase is a group of words that make a unit of syntax with a single grammatical function.

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36 views

Phrase usage: As a result

As far as what I've learned, this is how you use the phrase "as a result". e.g. He was late, as a result, he didn't catch the bus. = He was late***,*** he didn't catch the bus as a result. I would ...
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0answers
35 views

Could you please do X vs. Could you do X please

I'm an English teacher, and I heard a student say "could you please open the window" the other day. To my ears, "could you please open the window" as a construction sounds exasperated, even ...
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3answers
67 views

What word would you use to describe a situation where words are not necessary?

Example: "Their love was so strong that it was unspoken. Words were (replace) 'not necessary' for them to display their affection towards one another.
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1answer
28 views

“to take on a momentum of its own”

Can anyone help me with the meaning of the phrase "to take on a momentum of its own"? Does it mean "to start to continue its progress on its own without external assistance" or something like this? ...
0
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2answers
33 views

What would this sentence be considered?

"I wonder why X's don't have (insert subject) and you do" Is it a question? Statement? A question imbedded in a statement? Or would it depend on the tone that was used? Thank you in advance.
2
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9answers
119 views

Is there a word for this act?

Let me give you an example where I want this "mystery" word to fit. There are two person "A" and person "B". A had installed an air conditioner in his house long ago and has called in the customer ...
0
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3answers
75 views

Is there one word for people who always keep others above themselves?

For people who go an extra mile to make others comfortable, be it friends, family, etc. I need an adjective or a noun, most probably one word, that can describe people who always keep others above or ...
0
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1answer
36 views

is it correct to use 'often a times'?

Does the phrase "often a times" exist? If so, what is the correct way to use it? Would the following sentence be correct? I have seen him loafing about in the streets often a times.
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1answer
15 views

Use of 'such as themselves'?

Would it be correct to use the following sentence? The group make for a handsome lot. And that poise of talk can only be found in the most opulent of beings, such as themselves. I have been ...
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1answer
30 views

What is the meaning of “read of”? [on hold]

I saw this phrase in a sentence. Here it is: He read of the room that was prepared at the palace at Rheims for the use of Queen. What does it mean?
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1answer
21 views

care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors

Which of the phrases best describes the general responsibility for people who are under-age? care for minors / care of minors / guardianship of minors
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2answers
39 views

So far, so obvious

What is the meaning of "So far, so obvious"? Does it mean "Although out of expectation, it is actually true"?
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3answers
35 views

But I would say that, wouldn’t I?

What does it mean when after a personal statement someone says "But I would say that, wouldn’t I?"? Does it mean "any way, it is my idea"?
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2answers
34 views

Can we use “around about” like this? [on hold]

Can we use "around about" together as in the following sentence? The building was built around about 2 years ago.
1
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1answer
79 views

Is it grammatically correct to say “Year of built”?

Is it grammatically correct to say: Year of built 1922 when talking about house or some other building? I know i should probably use phrase: Built in 1922 or just Built 1922 but I ...
2
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1answer
33 views

How do you mean vs What do you mean?

What do people mean when they say How do you mean? Are they asking me to explain what I just said? Then how is it different from What do you mean?
2
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1answer
25 views

For those that like that sort of thing, that is the sort of thing they like

Can any one please explain the saying: "For those that like that sort of thing, that is the sort of thing they like" Does it mean: When someone likes some sort of thing, that sort of thing is ...
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0answers
24 views

Positive connotation Trojan horse?

There's a new app from Amazon called Amazon Underground. It supposedly provides 10,000 free non-IAP games. But what's the catch? Seems like the only thing it does it get the Amazon storefront to the ...
0
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3answers
47 views

What's the function of 'adding to' here [closed]

As the day drew to a close, Norwegians continued to pay their tribute to the dead, adding to the carpet of flowers outside the cathedral. I just read this and I wondered what adding to means ...
4
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5answers
83 views

Soft or more euphemistic way of saying “suffer”

One word I can think of is "bear". Any other words for it? I hate the idea of repeating the same word again and again. I want to use it for trivial things which make your life inconvenient but not ...
0
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1answer
52 views

Does “differ by” even exist? [on hold]

I have a question about the preposition for differ in the following context: A differs B merely from a chemical element. Or better to say: A differs B by a chemical element. I will ...
0
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0answers
39 views

Sentence doesn't “feel” right, but is it really incorrect?

A friend of mine wrote this sentence: 'The material consists of crumbly blocks, but they are still sturdy enough to not fall apart during bumpy transport.' To me this grates a bit. Even though the ...
1
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4answers
71 views

A word to describe “the presence of someone/something has little or no significance in a given situation”?

I am trying to use a single word/simple sentence to explain a situation where adding/not adding a part to a device won't make any difference to its functionality.
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2answers
52 views

Meaning of the phrase “without breaking down” [closed]

Computers are very reliable; they can work for a long time without breaking down. What does the phrase “without breaking down” mean in this sentence?
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3answers
102 views

The phrase “more sharp” vs “sharper”

So I was talking to my fiancee and she said "more sharp" to which I said "you mean sharper?". This is in context of talking about her current earrings being "more sharp" then her usual ones. She then ...
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0answers
26 views

Common phrases for “won't be classmates”

First, here's the context. There are these two kids who have been classmates ever since, but unfortunately they won't be classmates in the following year. What phrases can I use to describe this ...
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2answers
71 views

what does the phrase “a real word” mean?

I'm interested in how a word becomes "a real word" in English, and what constitutes that "real word" when it exists. Twentyfive questions appear in the list of questions already asked on this forum ...
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1answer
41 views

Which of the given phrases is correct?

Is the price negotiable for the job? OR Is the job price negotiable? Which is the correct phrase formation to be asked formally and please tell me the reason for its correctness. Thank you.
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1answer
56 views

Sentence Structures [closed]

Who told Thuzar about the accident? Microscopic insects can only be seen through a microscope. The bees stung the workman to death. The Tun Foundation presented our school with a generous donation. ...
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5answers
100 views

Alternative for “found something accidentally even when it was lying really close the whole time”

Let me give you an example of the situation where I would like to use this "word/phrase/idiom/expression". A friend of mine who had a laptop for 3 months now accidentally discovers that it is ...
2
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3answers
119 views

Let me all know what you think

I'm wondering about a certain phrase which I use without thinking about. One of my developers whose first language isn't English pointed it out, and it left me thinking if I've been saying it wrong. ...
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5answers
86 views

What would I call this computer science dilemma?

In computer science, programming languages like Java, C++, and Python are considered to be very popular. C++ is considered low-level, Java is considered mid-level, and Python is considered high-level. ...
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1answer
25 views

What is the origin of “sewn up”?

As in a guaranteed thing. For example, "Bill has twice the sales of anyone else on the floor so the sales competition is pretty well sewn up." I've tried to think of various metaphors it could be ...
0
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1answer
119 views

How to ask politely for the caller's name on a phone call

In case I've received a call and I don't know the caller I want to politely ask the name of the caller. What should I say in this situation?
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1answer
55 views

catch eye but not eyes

We say “something caught my eye" but not "eyes", why only one eye is caught and the other is free? I am not a native English speaker and this seems pretty strange to me as not being an one-eyed ...
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2answers
101 views

“two children were born out of this wedlock” is the usage correct?

Stella and David married in 1995. two children were born out of this wedlock. Is the usage "out of" correct?
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4answers
80 views

What does 'Apply yourself' really mean? [on hold]

For a long long time, I thought that applying oneself meant that whatever I know, I should be able to apply that to a problem that is presented to me. For example, if I was asked something, and I ...
4
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5answers
332 views

What is the origin of “on the way”?

Consider "on the way." (As in "are you coming home?" "we're on the way.") Is the origin from something relating to "way" meaning a lane or roadway, or, is the origin something relating to the ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Meaning of the phrase “difference is transparent”

Does "difference is transparent" mean something like invisible, not apparent? For example: "Like a char device, each block device is accessed through a filesystem node, and the difference between ...
1
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1answer
50 views

What does a “run on a bank” mean? [closed]

I've heard it in several finance movies and the sentiment is kind of clear but what does it actually mean, "a run on a bank"?
0
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2answers
53 views

How to explain that we stopped giving out cards for the day? [closed]

My restaurant uses a queue card (or ticket, I'm not sure what they're called) system. Question is, how should I say when I want to let my customers know that our restaurant stopped giving queue ...
4
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2answers
162 views

Adverbial phrase

What is an adverbial phrase ? I recently learnt 'to boot' , meaning in addition, as well. And someone was saying it is an adverbial phrase. I think I know what is an adverb, but never learnt of ...
1
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2answers
55 views

Idioms and common English phrases related to music? [closed]

I am writing a dissertation on musical education in developing countries. I would like to find titles for my section that are catchy. Does anyone have any recommendations for resources of ...
0
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1answer
76 views

“One thing to note” or “One thing to be noted”? [closed]

Just stumbled which to use when I was writing something. "One thing to note" seems to be used much more often, but clarifications from experts would be helpful.
0
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4answers
96 views

Similar phrases/words meaning “it is worth mentioning”

What could be the other phrases/words with similar meaning of "it is worth mentioning"? e.g. I would like to start a sentence with exactly same meaning of It is worth mentioning that [......]
0
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1answer
51 views

What are the sentence/ idioms and phrases often used in day to day life? Is there any good articles available listing these items?

English speaking peoples are most often using simple phrase in their day to day life. It would be help to speaking easily if those sentence or phrases known and share any link to learn those words.
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0answers
49 views

What does “being had” mean in “due regard being had to”?

What exactly is meant by due regard being had to? I can’t understand the use of being had in such sentences. I mean only that due regard to can be used instead of it.
0
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3answers
67 views

“Happy for you are improving”—grammatically correct?

Is it correct to say I am happy for you are improving! or does it necessarily have to be with that, as in here: I am happy that you are improving! ?
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1answer
86 views

Meaning of “using 10-dollar words to describe 10-cent ideas” [closed]

I came across the phrase "If you enjoy using 10-dollar words to describe 10-cent ideas,... " , but I am not sure what it means, specifically when related to Hindi. Do we have a similar expression in ...
0
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1answer
20 views

Still to be learnt [closed]

If something is still unknown and we want to say that it will happen only in the future that we learn about it, is it correct to say like this: We already know some details, but the rest is still ...