4
votes
3answers
237 views

Phrase for pooling funds with others for a purchase

I got an email today from a parent in my son's K class for a party the kids will be hosting for their teacher. Part of the content was this: I'm asking for volunteers for the following: ...
17
votes
5answers
1k views

Two kinds of “borrow”

In Hebrew there is a difference, although often overlooked in spoken Hebrew, between the word "to borrow" for something that is intended to be returned "as is" such as a tool or a vehicle, and the ...
1
vote
6answers
90 views

What's a good word for a category of non-technical blog posts?

I have a website mostly devoted to technical blog posts. In the main navigation there are links for JavaScript and CSS, which take you to a list of posts about those topics. My question is, what ...
3
votes
1answer
89 views

Are/were these strings of decorative colourful triangles known as “dags”?

There is an English word "dag" with various senses divided up into various etymologies. This question is about just one particular sense having this definition on Wiktionary: A hanging end or ...
0
votes
3answers
4k views

“thank you for the kind words”

I have seen and/or heard the sentence "thank you for the kind words" more than once. The context is usually that the speaker is responding to an appreciative comment in a discussion whose overall ...
2
votes
2answers
164 views

What is the meaning of 'the food chain'?

The OED confirms my long-held suspicion that the original use of the term 'food chain' is becoming supplanted by an altogether different meaning. The term 'food chain' was used extensively in the ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Conjunction when one element contains another

I write a paper that defines a certain algorithm on geometric shapes. I have a sentence similar to the following: If the input to the algorithm is connected, convex or rectangular, then its output ...
2
votes
3answers
136 views

Alternative to the idiomatic phrase “highway robbery”

I was wondering whether there were any other alternatives to the phrase "highway robbery". I am trying to say the same thing in a light-hearted, but not too casual way.
1
vote
2answers
109 views

Is “knocking on” an idea an idiom for dismissing the idea? [closed]

For years, I thought I'd heard others say, "I don't mean to knock on your idea, but..."—and it was definitely on, not down, although I've heard knock down as well—but now that I'm looking ...
4
votes
1answer
94 views

coffee flights in a six-seat bar

What do coffee flights and six-seat bar mean in the following post? The Orange County Register is now reporting that 39-year-old Duggan plans to open a slow bar adjacent to Portola, offering ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

To exact revenge or vengeance?

We are in the midst of a family disagreement about whether the correct phrase is to exact revenge or to exact vengeance. We could use a definitive answer (if one exists) or, at ...
-1
votes
1answer
102 views

Is “I need to deposit my checks” correct? [closed]

I haves a few checks and I want put them into my bank account. What's the approriate and natural sentence to describe my intention at a counter? Is "I need to deposit my checks" correct? What is ...
2
votes
1answer
257 views

Does a truism need to be true to be a truism?

I frequently hear people quoting widely-used idioms or proverbs as if they are fact, simply because they are used frequently by many people. For example, "An apple a day keeps the doctor away." Can ...
2
votes
5answers
616 views

Ruining something for someone else (spoils of war?)

Lately I've been thinking of a saying that describes the following: Ruining something for someone else, for the sole purpose of it not being useful any more to the other party, even though you do ...
15
votes
3answers
524 views

Can I use “US-American” to disambiguate “American”? If not, what can I use?

Based on this question, I wonder: as an alternative to USAian (which is very nonstandard) is it OK to use US-American to more clearly indicate "inhabitant of the USA"? According to Google Ngram, this ...
2
votes
2answers
779 views

Expression that means “as soon as something is finished”

I am looking for an expression that means "right after finishing something, start something". For some reason, the words "fresh off the heels" keep springing up but I googled them and it's not an ...
3
votes
5answers
782 views

What's the right way of expressing a desire to meet with someone in the future on the multiple basis?

What's the right way of expressing a desire to meet with someone in the future on the multiple basis (unspecified number of times, but definitely more than once)? We should surely meet again ...
6
votes
8answers
1k views

What would you call a person who is not a student, but takes interest in exploring academic topics?

A person who is not formally enrolled as a student, researcher or faculty in some university or college but who takes interest in exploring academic topics/stuff. For e.g. Such a person could be ...
4
votes
3answers
538 views

What term is most appropriate when describing the infinite space of possibilities created through inductive reasoning?

In arguments contrasting the differences between deductive reasoning and inductive reasoning, it is often pointed out that deductive reasoning is, by definition, bounded by the terms described in the ...
1
vote
7answers
5k views

A phrase like “Good effort!”

Does the phrase "good effort" imply failure? Like, even though you failed, it's good that you gave it your best shot? I'm looking for a phrase like "good effort" that does not imply failure. It would ...
4
votes
3answers
405 views

What does “it tastes like horspy” mean?

I heard an expression today but I did not know how it is written or what it is. And I could not find it with Google. It's something like: it tastes like horspy Any pointers?
3
votes
5answers
1k views

“What were you thinking…”

I want to ask about what emotion motivated someone to do something. Can the phrase "what were you thinking when you..." be used for this? It seems kind of unnatural to ask, "what were you feeling when ...
14
votes
12answers
15k views

Is there a term to describe speech that has a hidden meaning but is not sarcastic?

I want to describe how someone is saying something but hidden behind their words they are blaming the person they are talking to. It's kind of like sarcasm but not quite as strong. With sarcasm the ...