0
votes
3answers
55 views

What's it called when someone forms a general conclusion from something which is aberrant?

I'm trying to think of a phrase that describes someone who is in a certain situation and when an outcome out of the norm comes up then he takes the aberrant outcome and generalizes it, believing it to ...
1
vote
2answers
92 views

Professional term for “Apples to apples” comparison

Is there a term which would sound more fitting in an academic or professional setting for describing a comparison between two things highlighting the similarity of the measurement/comparison process?
18
votes
10answers
3k views

Is there a word or phrase meaning to plant my idea in someone else’s mind?

Is there a word or phrase that means to plant my idea in someone else’s mind so they think it is their own idea? Just like what happened in the movie Inception.
1
vote
5answers
89 views

English idiom equivalent to “Like a deaf man at a wedding procession”

I have been trying laboriously to find an equivalent idiom or a catchy phrase to the one we have in Arabic مثل الأطرش بالزقة which simply means, “He is like a deaf man at a wedding procession”. It is ...
2
votes
3answers
58 views

Words or phrases for 'credit takers'

Let say, A and B work in the same office. Every time A talks to B about his idea or working style, B always takes that idea to his boss and acts as if it was his own idea. What are words, phrases or ...
0
votes
2answers
58 views

Single word for attributing inappropriate motives to others' actions?

Is there a single word to describe someone who often attributes inappropriately trivial/cheap motives to another person's actions? I'm thinking along the lines of someone who puts himself briefly in ...
2
votes
2answers
106 views

Appropriate word for very fast [closed]

Can some one tell me the appropriate word instead of 'very fast' in sentence: Don't loose hope very fast.
-1
votes
3answers
65 views

Is it OK to say “There is no problem if you do it next week.”?

I need to reply to a commercial email where my "colleague" says that he we will do the job next week. Is it good English to say "There is no problem if you do it next week." ? Is there another way to ...
2
votes
4answers
95 views

How you do you say “What is this word?” in a friendly, indirect and elaborate way?

In French, when you don't know what the hell a word means that's just been mentioned, instead of flat-out asking “What is that?” we have an informal expression “Hmmm, ça se mange?” (Litterally, “can ...
2
votes
1answer
32 views

Another (perhaps humorous) term for “The Gold Standard”

Gold Standard as in: an example against which others of the same type are compared - http://www.merriam-webster.com/thesaurus/gold%20standard Any other humorous ways to refer to this? ...
1
vote
1answer
67 views

What is the most pejorative phrase we can come up with for soccer foul fakers? [closed]

You know the ones: association football player flailing on the ground in world-class screaming agony; yet the TV replay shows he was not even touched – and it's an Oscar performance bid. 60 seconds ...
1
vote
8answers
354 views

What do you call the noise(s) that block you from hearing?

I am looking for a particular word to describe absurd noises which block your hearing. Not so long ago, I was talking to a friend of mine in a public place and we were unable to hear each other well, ...
7
votes
17answers
752 views

What do you call someone who is so inappropriate that they are appropriate?

So we have a guy in my office. He can say almost anything. Race jokes, gender jokes, he is just really inappropriate about everything but funny. He is not a racist or sexist and gets along with ...
2
votes
4answers
160 views

Word for foreigner or person of another race mistaking you for someone?

When I am traveling Europe I often get mistaken for someone (maybe famous). I believe it has to do with the foreigner maybe not knowing the person's looks that well but I think it is more of not ...
3
votes
4answers
347 views

What's a noun for the group of people who you're very close to, such as family, friends, relatives, and significant others?

If I wanted to describe all of the people close to someone such as their close friends, family, relatives, and spouse/significant other, how would I do so with one noun? The simplest 'noun' that ...
4
votes
8answers
177 views

Adjective to best describe sense of helplessness

I am writing a small piece on the current financial and economic crisis, and I am looking for adjectives or short expressions that describe the sense of helplessness that seems to hang over many ...
3
votes
6answers
162 views

Word for lack of comprehension of something easy to comprehend

So, I was watching this Vsauce youtube video, which discusses Déjà vu, Presque vu, and Jamais vu. Now, all three concepts are something I'm aware of and have experienced, but it made me think of ...
1
vote
2answers
109 views

What's it called when one is so familiar with a language that phrases just “sound” right or wrong?

Native speakers, especially those who have read a lot of writing or literature for a given language, acquire the ability to "know" whether something is grammatically correct (or not) just from their ...
3
votes
2answers
118 views

Is there more than a 'double' whammy?

I have three (could grow to be more) bad reasons for a situation and I wondered if there is such a thing as a triple whammy that is an extension of the double whammy. From my research online, a triple ...
11
votes
8answers
4k views

How to describe a guy who is popular with girls?

Perhaps I should make it clear: - He naturally attracts girls. - He doesn't chase girls and have no intention for any relationship. - You just see him often together with girls.
1
vote
2answers
18 views

term for the review of available technologies

I'm looking for a phrase analogous to "literature review", but referring to the review of technologies available to solve a particular problem. That is, what would I call the process of comparing the ...
19
votes
8answers
4k views

Alternative to “We'll just have to agree to disagree”

Is there a polite alternative to "We'll just have to agree to disagree" that can be used as an exit strategy from a relatively friendly debate when a person feels they've said all they have to say and ...
-1
votes
2answers
229 views

High level saying of the sentence “I don't just work for timepass”

Basically, I want to tell my superiors that whatever work I perform, I do it to the fullest and I do it efficiently. So I want to express the sentence: I dont work forcibly and for time pass. I ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

What is a non-secular and possibly offensive version of “for heaven's sake”? [closed]

In Is there a secular, non vulgar alternative to "for heaven's sake"? Terdon asks for something that is polite, secular, and non-offensive. I am asking for what is a non-secular phrase ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

How to use a catch-phrase for a validated result when presented before an examining committee?

Imagine, that someone is preparing for a PhD defense. The thesis that he is going to defend is by far against the norm. That is, it uncovers deep-seated beliefs that led to 30 years of malpractice. So ...
44
votes
25answers
11k views

Is there a secular, non vulgar alternative to “for heaven's sake”?

I know for heaven's sake, for Pete's sake, for God's sake and for Christ's sake. All of those, however are religious references. The only non-religious equivalent phrases I know are for fuck's sake ...
0
votes
3answers
126 views

Need native expressions for “something happened but no one wants to undertake the responsibility”

Are there native expressions in oral and formal writing English about something happened - mostly negative incidents or events, but those, who should be responsible for it , don't want to undertake ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

“Call off” somebody from his post?

I am looking for a term that I could use to say that the new Minister of Health removed the present holder of the given post from his position. My first idea was call off, but then I looked up the ...
1
vote
5answers
685 views

How can I politely express that “I have understood”?

When my professor instructs me during his/her office hour, I may simply show my understanding by "Got it" or "I see". But I wonder how to say that politely and professionally in written English, ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

local knowledge of the territory

In business language, how could you say: local knowledge of the territory? As in: The company has a deep knowledge of the territory, i.e., logistics, suppliers, clients and people knowledge, etc. ...
181
votes
36answers
74k views

Is there a non-sexual phrase for sleeping with someone?

The phrase "sleeping with someone" often means "having sex." What is the origin of this sexual connotation? Is there a non-sexual equivalent of this phrase to express sleeping with someone without ...
33
votes
18answers
7k views

Is there a word for being so polite as to appear insincere?

I'm looking for a term in English to describe being so polite that one appears to be insincere.
1
vote
3answers
13k views

“thank you for the kind words”

I have seen and/or heard the sentence "thank you for the kind words" more than once. The context is usually that the speaker is responding to an appreciative comment in a discussion whose overall ...
1
vote
5answers
116 views

A phrase for 'a free, informal space for learning'

What could be a short phrase for 'a free and informal space for learning?'
3
votes
1answer
84 views

What expression are these titles alluding to?

There are two episode titles from two separate shows that are written similarly: From Castle: The mistress always spanks twice From Doc Martin: The GP always rings twice Episode titles are usually ...
0
votes
2answers
175 views

What's an expression that means bringing something to where it can be seen or used?

I'm specifically thinking of in a public service context. Say there is a resource that exists but no one knows about it or makes use of it, so instead of waiting for the people to come to the ...
1
vote
1answer
107 views

Is the expression “moderator's set” used in English? What would you call it?

We are talking about a small suitcase which contains different presentation materials like markers, felt pens, post-its, paper in different shapes, laser pointers etc. for convention organization. ...
1
vote
4answers
483 views

a better expression for 'percentage divided by 100'

The function f(a,x) returns the value in the array a specified by x, where x is a percentage of the length of the array, divided by 100. (i.e. x can be any number between 0 and 1, corresponding ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

How to correctly express an intention to work on a certain day instead of working on another day?

How to say "I will work on Saturday instead of working on Tuesday" in a more natural fashion? I guess the verb will be constructed like "work or make" + "out or off or ?", but what is the exact ...
0
votes
2answers
98 views

Who is watching the watchdog?

I am looking for an expression that conveys the meaning Who is watching the watchdog?
1
vote
3answers
88 views

Expression for “things we are responsible to share and work out together”?

Is there a word or phrase for "things we are responsible to share and work out together"? For example, we are in a team, so we have to work together and responsibility for every member is the same. ...
4
votes
3answers
267 views

A phrase whose meaning is different from a combination of its constituents?

The are phrases whose meaning is not what you would get from combining its constituent words (i.e., they violate the Principle of compositionality). Some are entity names, e.g., "weird science" ...
10
votes
7answers
796 views

Word or phrase for “seeing meaning where none exists”

Is there a word or a phrase to describe an instance where meaning is ascribed to something where there is no such meaning or where the interpretation is particularly fanciful? For example, when ...
0
votes
2answers
200 views

How to phrase 'people have become acutely/increasingly aware of X' [closed]

I'm trying to convey the idea that people's behavior on the Internet is a reflection of our increasing social self-awareness, almost like a communal entity. For context, here is the paragraph I'm ...
-2
votes
1answer
543 views

replacement for expression “there are.” [duplicate]

So my writing teacher hates the expression "there are" in essays. Does anybody know some good substitutes for this overused expression? Thanx ya'll, much appreciated!
1
vote
3answers
329 views

Replacements for that

I've recently become aware that I use the word "that" way too much, especially in more academic writing. I've noted in particular that I use "that" almost exclusively after words like "implies" (I've ...
1
vote
6answers
563 views

word/phrase for “treating the problem rather than the symptom”?

Is there a word that mean's the equivalent (or close to) the expression "treat the problem rather than the symptom" ? If not, is there a concise way to say this? For example, in discussing ...
4
votes
4answers
199 views

Is there a concise term for being over-aware of bad news happening?

That was probably a terrible title, but I'm looking for a word or phrase to describe this concept. We all probably have a relative like this, they feel that the world is "going to hell" around them - ...
41
votes
9answers
3k views

What is the opposite of the Devil's Advocate?

If I am arguing against a proposal that I may actually agree with, then I am playing Devil's Advocate. However, what if I do not necessarily agree with the proposal but am arguing for it, with the ...
45
votes
24answers
4k views

Are there counterpart English expressions to Japanese proverb, "the nail that pops up is always hammered down?

I was once reminded by Robusto-san of a Japanese popular saying, ‘出る釘は打たれる - the nail that pops up is always hammered down,’ when I complained about sequential down-votes that I received. I wondered ...